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37th Infantry Division

Discussion in 'Information Requests' started by Fallschirmjaeger, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. firstflabn

    firstflabn recruit

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    T/O&E 6-10-1, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, Motorized, Division Artillery, Infantry Division.

    T/O&E 6-26 and -36 were the HHB for the 105mm and 155mm battalions, so, clearly, div arty had its own separate HHB.
     
  2. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    The Bangor Library collection of unit histories has been cited in several posts for various units. They are doing the public a great service by making those unit histories available online. Thanks for posting the link to the 37th Division's 1940-41 yearbook. That should have been done long ago. While many, like my great uncle, did not join the 37th until after 1941, there are many that were with the 37th when the USA entered the War. Again, thanks for posting the link here.
     
  3. dras52

    dras52 New Member

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    Very happy to have made even a small contribution. Still trying to catch up!
    I'm going to look at the yearbook again. I could swear that the cover looks vaguely familiar from when I was a little boy. Could have been at my grandmother's house, but I still did not see anything about Dad. I do remember that she had a fringed "Camp Shelby" pillow on her sofa for many years!

    I know Dad was with the 37th early on as I remember one of his rare stories. It's short so bear with me. During the time they were at Camp Shelby, he related that they were involved in "War Games" in Louisiana. Hot, swampy, bugs,snakes and mud. Must have been right in the bayou. Apparently the driver who was towing "The General's" command trailer managed to hit a stump and flipped both the truck and the trailer over and crashed into a tree. (Didn't say which General but I suppose could have been Beightler). The panicked call went out for a carpenter to make emergency repairs and as that was Dad's job while working his way through Hamline university, he managed to volunteer to the right people. The orders to the top Sergeant were to grab Dad, grab a truck, and rush to town (with escort)and get any and all tools and materials to make immediate repairs. Well, Pop went to work and within the day not only had the trailer repaired but improved with better amenities and use of space. He said that was what earned him his first stripe and the attention of the brass at Headquarters. Kind of cool,...you just never know how events can work out.
    By the way, in looking at the download of the 37th history book...I wonder if that is the ENTIRE book?! It seems to end with the
    62nd FA BRIGADE without going any further to the regimental level. On the last page (227) there is a picture of the Headquarters
    Battery of the 62nd. At the end of the first row is Marty Tiefert who I vividly remember Dad saying was a good friend of his. So, maybe getting closer. Could you Vets take a look and tell me what you think? Thanks!
     
  4. dras52

    dras52 New Member

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    Nevermind...I figured out the book download. Sheesh!


    Merry Christmas everyone!!
     
  5. dras52

    dras52 New Member

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    Thanks, I think I know what you mean...
     
  6. dras52

    dras52 New Member

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    Hope everyone had a great Christmas!

    T,...I'm pretty sure you would be aware of this site. It's a very good narrative of the battle, and I know Dad was there. One of the few times he gave me the description of the battlefield...thousands killed from their artillery. He walked the area the day after and this where he picked up the Arisaka he sent home telling me the gouges on the stock were made by the same thing that killed all those Japanese.
    Anyway...
    http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-bougainville-37th-infantry-divisions-battle-for-hill-700.htm

    Dave
     
  7. Airassault2010

    Airassault2010 New Member

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    Marla,

    Generally MPs did not engage in regular battles unless it was necessary. Have you tried searching for his specific battalion?

    Joel
     
  8. rkline56

    rkline56 USS Oklahoma City CG5

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    Nice share.
     
  9. Imaginarysonics

    Imaginarysonics New Member

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    My grandfather fought with the 37th Infantry Division in World War II - I believe he was with the 2nd Battalion, 145th Infantry to be precise. I believe he was a sergeant/technician... possibly a cook as well? His name was Benjamin "Pat" Brann, was possibly referred to by Pat and not Ben by those who knew him best. He was from Graves County Kentucky, but after the war he went on to become a Kansas City Police Officer until he retired. He passed away on April 11th, 1995. There is a headstone for him in Higgensville, MO, but his ashes are scattered at the flagstaff at Memorial Park in Omaha, Nebraska. If anyone knew Benjamin Brann, or knows where I could find more information about him, please let me know. RIP to all those who served.
     
  10. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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  11. Imaginarysonics

    Imaginarysonics New Member

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    Having trouble downloading the PDF, but I'll give it another try -- is there somewhere else I can find the file? And thanks. It looks like he was It looks like he might have been in Company B out of Cleveland, Ohio if that helps. His enlistment as a Private was February 4th, 1941... was living in Summit County. But his records indicate he was actually in Company K... I don't know if he switched somewhere, or if Company K was out of Cleveland or not. I know he was awarded two Bronze Stars for the Luzan Campaign, was in the Solomons, Bugainville, and the Phillipines (I'm guessing Milan, but I don't know for sure - he was awarded another Bronze Star here as well). His Commanding Officer was a man named Captain James W. Casey. I think he shipped out from San Francisco and came back by way of Long Beach, but that's also not entirely confirmed yet. Anyway, any helpful info anyone might have, or who might have served with my grandfather, or knew anyone who might have would be very helpful. Thank you!
     
  12. Imaginarysonics

    Imaginarysonics New Member

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    I got the file open - I found my grandfather's company and C.O. but I don't think he's in the book anywhere... I think he enlisted too late in 1941, so he might be in the next year.
     
  13. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    The 37th Infantry Division, which would include the 145th Infantry, did leave the US from San Francisco 26 May 1942. They arrived in the Fiji Islands 11 June 1942. In the Solomon Islands, the 145th first saw combat on New Georgia Island. They landed on Bougainville in November 1943. In March 1944 they fought on Hill 700 in the Second Battle of Bougainville. On 9 Jan 1945, they participated in the assault landing at Lingayan Gulf on Luzon Island in the Philippines. At the end of January, they fought in the 5 day battle to recapture Clark Field and Fort Stotsenburg. From there the 37th ID drove on to Manila where the 145th first experienced urban combat. After Manila was wrested from the Japanese in early March 1945, the 145th remained in Manila while the rest of the Division to northwestern Luzon to help clearing Northern Luzon. In early June 1945, the 145th rejoined the Division to help in mop up operations. After the War, the regiment returned to the US via Los Angeles and was inactivated at Camp Anza, California.

    You may want to check out the Facebook page 37th Infantry Division in WWII, which has been actively posting photos and documents on the 145th. They may be able to offer some assistance. If you shop on Ebay, the Division history The 37th Infantry Division in World War II written by Stanley Frankel comes up from time to time. You could also see if your local library has it or can get it on loan from another library. It's an excellent history. Unfortunately, I have not come across a Regimental history for the 145th.
     

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