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Butterfly Bombs

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by Canberra Man, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. Canberra Man

    Canberra Man Member

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    Hi.
    I've browsed through the forums and found no mention of the Butterfly Bomb. The towns chosen by the Germansfor this new weapon were, my home town of Grimsby and neighbouring Cleethorpes, also in the equation was Newark in Nottinghamshire. The bombs were dropped packed in a cylinderical container and on opening, the bombs were spread far and wide. Us kids had a near escape, after the all clear sounded, all the families would congregate at street corners and passages and have a natter before a cup of tea and back to bed. The youngsters (me included) had a lucky escape. In the morning, four were found where we had been playing.
    The bombs were clever, on falling clear of the container, they would open. The ends would form a slight angle to each other acting as a propellor. The bomb casing would rotate unscrewing the fuse, the amount unscrewed on landing gave it its sensitivity. If it unscrewed completely, it was a contact bomb, hellisn things.

    Ken
     
  2. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    sniper1946 likes this.
  3. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    Ken

    do you remember the month and year........possibly 1945 ?

    am interesting and deadly weapon used heavily on the Ost front, think sniper and I posted links last year on different LW weapons systems
     
  4. Canberra Man

    Canberra Man Member

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    Hi Erich.
    The butterfly bombs dropped on one night only and that was June 1943.
    At eighty, the memory is not so good, I may be a month or two either side.

    Ken
     
  5. kerrd5

    kerrd5 Ace

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    Here is the first of three photos I found at the NARA, College Park,
    in January.

    If anyone would like a high-res copy of this photo, just let me know.


    Dave
     

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  6. kerrd5

    kerrd5 Ace

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    Here is the second photo.



    Dave
     

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  7. kerrd5

    kerrd5 Ace

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    And the last photo.

    All Credit NARA.


    Dave
     

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  8. Fred Wilson

    Fred Wilson "The" Rogue of Rogues

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    US:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPFkg1ozNbQ
     
  9. harolds

    harolds Member

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    What is interesting about these things is that the U.S airforce had an almost exact copy of this weapon that they used in WW2 (as shown in the above video) but also in Vietnam and afterward.
     
  10. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    An early predecessor of the current "cluster" bomb" , at least in idea.?
     
  11. harolds

    harolds Member

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    I'm sure. In the 70's we even had an artillery version-Improved Conventional Munitions!
     
  12. sonofacameron

    sonofacameron Member

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    The first anti-personnel or "Butterfly" Bombs to be dropped on Ipswich, Suffolk, occurred 27th October 1940. Taken from "Ipswich jn the 2nd world war" by David Jones page 83.
     

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