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Certainly the Art of War!

Discussion in 'Art of War' started by gtblackwell, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    Full credit to go to Gordon Wilkie for his FB page on WW1 & WW2 Memories, a Russian photographer of considerable skill just posted a truly amazing collection of his work on German WW1 &2 Memorials. It cost me a couple of hours or more of work as I had to go over every photo and the descriptions. The range of styles and types of memorials is fascinating to me. I have a background in art history and it was most interesting to see how art in general affected the work shown. Political influences are equally of interest. I was particularly interested in the combination of classical Roman and Greek sculptural influence in war memorials in the inter-war years.

    Certainly one of the best exhibits of war memorials I have seen. I am saving this to a folder, Gordon, to continue my studies of it.

    Gaines

    The Woe of the Vanquished
     
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  2. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Wow...some are very Romanesque...other styles are new to me...some stunning sculptures.
     
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  3. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Just glad you enjoyed it as much as I did, Gaines.:cool:
     
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  4. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    CAC, some of the memorials certainly have that Romanesque grotesque quality, sort of clunky awkwardness that often shows mass and power. diametrically opposite to the Greco-Roman influences. Many years ago I came across a French Romanesque church in which the nave columns of huge proportions appeared to be sitting on the bodies of unfortunate "sinners" their arms and feet sticking out!

    Gordon, thank you for bringing this work to light, to say I enjoyed it is an understatement!

    Gaines
     
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