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Dodge WC 50 series Spare Tire mounting

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by Dave55, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Dave55

    Dave55 Member

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    Curious why many of the 3/4 ton Dodge variants have the spare tire mounted on the left side so that it blocks the driver getting in and out. Why not mount it on the right? They never made any with right hand steering so that wasn't a design consideration.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodge_WC_series#WC3.2C_WC13.2C_WC21
     
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  2. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    I don't know, but it was a great little truck.
     
  3. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    I do not know either but their was a WW2 Dodge ambulances parked at a service station just south of Birmingham for many years. May still be that. I stopped to look at it, station was closed, and was amazed how "beefy" it was. I guess, theb "Power Chassis" I saw after the war on farms around my area..

    Wild guess, could the tire placement for a little extra protection for the driver, pretty far fetched but there has to be some reason. Good question, Dave .
     
  4. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I can't answer your question, but I wonder if the spare was mounted on the door so that when the door was opened the tire opened with it. Interesting question. I hope one of our vehicle experts chimes in.
     
  5. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    Argh. Another excellent detail query, Dave?

    Errrmmm.

    Gaines may have a point.
    I'm also wondering if it's structural - some heavy weapons variants also stash a bit of weight in that spot. Might be the only mounting point for the relatively chunky wheels fitted to the Beep's otherwise light bodies in those configurations? (Pretty sure they're fixed, Lou).
    If it is the only hard/strong mounting point available, I suppose it makes more sense to block the driver's side than the other 'doors' - drivers perhaps more likely to stay with the vehicle. (And I'm sure I've read that Beeps became pretty commonly rear echelon quite quickly? Something to do with air visibility as potential command vehicle. )
    Can be quite funny watching someone clamber/crawl out of one driver side, especially with the tilt up.

    To the books/manuals... you swine. I want to know now.


    Nice little site (well worth a shufti at the other pages) :
    http://www.command-car.com/commandcar/historyccPilot.html
     
  6. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    The more I look at the images on those pages, the more I think 'where else could it go'?
    Spindly-bodied 'open-topped' Beep variants: On command car bodies the General/Officer/passenger/guard is more likely to hop out than the driver. On Weapon carriers, possibly the same - can't go on the back (blocking access to important stuff, and often no tailgat anyway), underneath (Not enough clearance and perhaps unwise for a small MV anyway), or bonnet (Big tire... visibility).
    Compromise required - the fleshy thing behind the wheel gets a bit of a short straw?
     
  7. Dave55

    Dave55 Member

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    Yeah, I gave that some thought too. I was thinking there will always be a driver but not always a passenger, so why not mount it on the right? But then if the driver is incapacitated, the passenger might be trapped. But if there is a front seat passenger, and he gets hit the driver can't get out easily if the spare is on the left. Makes sense what you said about passengers getting out on the right. Curb side exiting used to be more stressed in the early days of motoring. Maybe it was a carry over.
     
  8. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    they can get out and in from left? correct?? the door opens?? no?
     
  9. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    'Official' explanation blank still drawn, Dave.
    But... I now just think 'look at the body'. Beeps are light & wide-bodied with big wheels in that arrangement.
    That spot near the bulkhead is about the only strongpoint I can see on carryall or WC style bodies that wouldn't lead to excessive width while still supporting the chunky wheel.
    "Driver... Yeah, he can get used to it" was, I suspect, the bottom line.
     
  10. Dave55

    Dave55 Member

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    I don't think the spare tire mount swings out of the way, so the driver's door or driver's entrance area would be blocked.
    Maybe they swung out of the way like the spare on the back of a 2016 Jeep. I don't think they did though.
     
  11. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    Not on weapon carriers, don't think so on carryalls.
     
  12. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    that would be almost unbelievable...I know engineers do some idiotic things though....I see the point in these pics...from great link..did someone mention maybe for some protection from shrapnel as a reason?? some protection?
    something else, you want the riders to be able to exit before the driver, no?? driver should get the vehicle away ASAP, if he can't, riders should be out faster to form protection ?? so if any place is usable, you don't want it near rear or passenger doors ?? tailgate needs to be used often for unloading and loading supplies, troops, wounded, etc, while driver could be idling, waiting to move on........ingress/egress more important in that area, no? ingress/egress more important for all areas than for driver....? as VonP states

    http://usautoindustryworldwartwo.com/Chrysler/dodge-trucks.htm
     

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  13. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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  14. Sarge

    Sarge Member

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    Well, I'm not sure how it works on some of the vehicles shown, but one of them - the last one - there is room for the driver to crawl over/behind the tire to get into the drivers seat.
    I have an M37B1 3/4 ton that has the spare mounted on the drivers door, but the mount swings out when the door is opened thus allowing easy access to the drivers seat.
    Sarge
     

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