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For the other Astronuts out there

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Biak, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Okay, so I'm going to go all Nostradamus on ya but get ready for the age of the Universe to be re-explained !

    upload_2022-7-7_20-44-3.png

    Recently released test image from JWST. All those diminishing blurs are Galaxies ! Can't wait to hear the 'theories' on the Hubble Constant measurement excuses.
    As for predictions : Mankind will eventually learn there is such a thing as Infinity. No beginning and no end. Just our desire to be more than we are, mear specks among specks.
     
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  2. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Getting there. A few links in the article.
    It's only a few days until NASA and its partners on the James Webb Space Telescope project reveal the first full-color images and spectroscopic data captured by the observatory. The agency has shed a little more light on what to expect by revealing the JWST's initial list of cosmic targets.

    One of them is the Carina Nebula, which is around 7,600 light years away. NASA says it's one of the biggest and brightest nebulae in the sky and it includes stars that are several times larger than the Sun. Another nebula the telescope captured images from is the Southern Ring. That's roughly 2,000 light years from Earth and is a planetary nebula — it's an expanding cloud of gas that surrounds a dying star.

    Closer to home is the gas planet WASP-96 b, which is almost 1,150 light years away and has around half the mass of Jupiter. NASA will provide a look at the planet's light spectrum data. Much further from here is Stephan’s Quintet, which is around 290 million light years away in the Pegasus constellation. This is the first compact galaxy group that was discovered, all the way back in 1877. It comprises five galaxies, four of which "are locked in a cosmic dance of repeated close encounters," NASA said.

    Also on Tuesday, NASA, the European Space Agency and Canadian Space Agency will reveal imagery for SMACS 0723. "Massive foreground galaxy clusters magnify and distort the light of objects behind them, permitting a deep field view into both the extremely distant and intrinsically faint galaxy populations," NASA explained.

    A committee of experts from NASA, ESA, CSA and the Space Telescope Science Institute spent five years determining the first targets for Webb's instruments. The full-color images and spectroscopic data that JSWT captured will be revealed on July 12th at 10:30AM ET. You'll be able to view them on NASA's website.

    This marks an important step for JWST as it marks the official beginning of the observatory's general science operations. The aim is to provide us with more detailed images and information about the earliest stars and galaxies as well as potentially habitable exoplanets. After launch in December, it took several months for the JWST to reach its destination and prepare for full operation. We're very close to finding out just what the observatory is capable of.


    Engadget | Technology News & Reviews
     
  3. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    upload_2022-7-11_20-10-3.png

    NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has produced the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date. Known as Webb’s First Deep Field, this image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 is overflowing with detail.

    Thousands of galaxies – including the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared – have appeared in Webb’s view for the first time. This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground.

    This deep field, taken by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), is a composite made from images at different wavelengths, totaling 12.5 hours – achieving depths at infrared wavelengths beyond the Hubble Space Telescope’s deepest fields, which took weeks.

    The image shows the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 as it appeared 4.6 billion years ago. The combined mass of this galaxy cluster acts as a gravitational lens, magnifying much more distant galaxies behind it. Webb’s NIRCam has brought those distant galaxies into sharp focus – they have tiny, faint structures that have never been seen before, including star clusters and diffuse features. Researchers will soon begin to learn more about the galaxies’ masses, ages, histories, and compositions, as Webb seeks the earliest galaxies in the universe.

    This image is among the telescope’s first-full color images. The full suite will be released Tuesday, July 12, beginning at 10:30 a.m. EDT, during a live NASA TV broadcast. Learn more about how to watch.
     
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  4. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    This is cool…but I was hoping for some closer up pics…maybe of Andromeda’s stars for example…What does Pluto look like from the Webb etc etc…
     
  5. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Stay tuned. The next few months are going to be special.
     
  6. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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  7. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Reminds me of the M2-F2…That’s the one Steve Austin crashed in…

    upload_2022-7-13_0-12-40.jpeg
     
  8. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Basically it's a Mini-Me of the shuttle. Capable of carrying seven astronauts or in my estimation : a crew of 3 or 4 "Guardians" (I hate that name), in orbit and be prepared to deliver Hell & Damnation to those who threaten us.
     
  9. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    It's a "lifting body", they all look pretty much the same.
     
  10. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    GRW and Kai-Petri like this.
  11. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Those images are amazing!
     
  12. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  13. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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  14. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    FROM APOD

    A Moon Dressed Like Saturn
    Image Credit & Copyright: Francisco Sojuel

    Explanation: Why does Saturn appear so big? It doesn't -- what is pictured are foreground clouds on Earth crossing in front of the Moon. The Moon shows a slight crescent phase with most of its surface visible by reflected Earthlight known as ashen glow. The Sun directly illuminates the brightly lit lunar crescent from the bottom, which means that the Sun must be below the horizon and so the image was taken before sunrise. This double take-inducing picture was captured on 2019 December 24, two days before the Moon slid in front of the Sun to create a solar eclipse. In the foreground, lights from small Guatemalan towns are visible behind the huge volcano Pacaya.
     
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  16. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Reminds me of that old commercial :
    "Is it Live, or is it Memorex"?
     
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  17. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "A GROUP of scientists believe that they have "fundamentally challenged" one of Sir Isaac Newton's laws of physics - the conservation of momentum.
    In 1687, Sir Isaac laid down the laws of motion in Principia Mathematica- laws which have still held true over 300 years later. In the law of conservation of momentum, he noted that the momentum of a system would always remain constant, which means that when an object moves, it has to push against something else. However, in a new study, researchers have found that this so-called “fundamental” law, may not be universally true, and could differ at least in curved space.
    By conducting experiments, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology in the US discovered that the opposite is true- that when bodies exist in curved space, they can move without pushing against anything."
    www.express.co.uk/news/science/1653158/Isaac-newton-laws-of-physics-torn-apart-conservation-momentum-science-breakthrough
     
  18. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    I don't remember Newton's Law stating a moving object "has" to push against anything. Just momentum will continue until affected by an outside influence ? Gravity and air are both an outside influence?

    "The researchers discovered that as these robots moved, gravity and friction did exert force on them, but they seem to have combined with the curvature effects "to produce a strange dynamic with properties neither could induce on their own".

    Now my brain hurts !
     
  19. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    As I understood it "A body, whether at rest or in motion, will remain in that state unless -or until- acted on by some external force (or influence)".
    Worded a bit differently here though.
    Newton's Second Law of Motion

    You and me both.
     
  20. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Still remember sitting on the living room floor four feet from the black and white console TV watching Armstrong stepping off the LEM !

    CNN - Breaking News, Latest News and Videos

    The mission -- which will kick off the Artemis program, with the aim of eventually returning humans to the moon -- carries on a tradition that began in the 1960s of NASA spacecraft bearing mementos. The tradition includes the Voyager probe's gold record and the Perseverance rover's microchip of 10.9 million names. Artemis I will carry 120 pounds of mementos and other items in its official flight kit.



    Moonikins reporting for duty


    Sitting in the commander's seat of Orion will be Commander Moonikin Campos, a suited mannequin that can collect data on what future human crews might experience on a lunar trip. Its name, picked via a public contest, is a nod to Arturo Campos, a NASA electrical power subsystem manager who aided in Apollo 13's safe return to Earth.



    NASA will roll out its massive rocket for a flight around the moon earlier than planned.


    Space.com: NASA, Space Exploration and Astronomy News

    The agency had been targeting Thursday (Aug. 18) for the Artemis 1 Space Launch System (SLS) rocket to make the slow trek out to Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39B in advance of blasting off on Aug. 29. But on Monday (Aug. 15), NASA announced(opens in new tab) that the plan changed, with rollout moved up to Tuesday evening (Aug. 16). You can watch coverage of rollout beginning at 3 p.m. EDT (1900 GMT) courtesy of NASA.


    "@NASA is targeting as soon as 9 pm EDT of Tuesday, Aug. 16 for rollout of @NASA_SLS ahead of a targeted Aug. 29 #Artemis I launch," agency officials wrote .
     

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