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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by The_Historian, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    I may have addressed this somewhere else, but my amateur metal detecting has turned up all these Johnny Ringo artifacts around the old adobe ruins on my property. I can not definitively attribute these rare and valuable artifacts to Mr. Ringo, but there's no reason they couldn't be his. You have here a couple of hinges, odd bits of metal, a rare piece of angle iron, part of the funnel that Johnny used to get whiskey into his mouth when his hand became unsteady, and the very plow that his Mom used to pull around the field after the mule died. Johnny felt bad about shooting that mule, but it was an old mule and bound to get shot sooner or later. According to local lore, Johnny was very fond of his Ma and used to sip whiskey on the shady porch, while shouting encouragement to her when she hit a rock or something dragging that plow out in the field.

    After plowing all day, Mrs. Ringo would generally shoot a passing javelina and cook Johnny and his gang heaping plates of pinto beans with peppers and javelina knuckles. On Sundays the whole family would put on their best clothes and ride all the way to Fort Bowie to get stinking drunk on green Mezcal and start fights with Mexicans. It was a simpler time and people enjoyed wholesome outdoor fun. And whiskey.

    Johnny Ringo.jpg
     
  2. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist

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    If that list of forts by county is anything to go by, it doesn't appear to be complete.
    "Locations and details of thousands of ancient hill forts found across the landscapes of the UK and Ireland have been mapped in an online database for the first time.
    Researchers have spent five years sifting through and recording information on all the hill forts across England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland, the Republic of Ireland and the Isle of Man.
    They have discovered there are 4,147 such ancient sites, ranging from well-preserved forts to places where only crop marks and remnants reveal where they once stood."
    Interactive graphic lets you explore 4,000 UK hill forts | Daily Mail Online
     
  3. rkline56

    rkline56 USS Oklahoma City CG5

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    Until he picked a fight with Doc Holliday and friends. Then it was all she wrote. Holliday, "Why Johnny Ringo you look like you just saw a ghost walk over your grave." Pop - thud. One of the best lines from Tombstone. Doc. could really make them up.

    I digress: Back on topic - Very interesting, Hogan. Archaeologists Discover 4,000-Year-Old Homestead…in Ohio

    French Creek near Sheffield OH was settled around 1830 by the European settlers. It is very near Lake Erie and would have supplied great fish for these unnamed natives. A few miles North is the lovely town of Bay Village on the shore of Erie.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2017
  4. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist

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    Love the way they contradict themselves,
    "Human bones discovered in Somerset reveal how cannibal cavemen feasted on each other.
    Now a beauty spot for tourists, Cheddar Gorge was populated by cannibals 14,700 years ago, who decapitated their dead, filleted the flesh from their bodies and made drinking cups from their skulls.
    Archaeologists have now found the first evidence that the cannibals engraved the bones after butchering them.
    It means new mystery over the hunter-gatherer remains in Britain’s most famous Palaeolithic site.
    The zigzag markings carved into the bones could be a savage tribal emblem left by early humans who killed their victims and ate them up.
    Or they may be a funeral rite in tribute to the dead, who died naturally but were eaten by their companions out of necessity when food was scarce.
    Evidence that our cavemen were cannibals was met with much excitement years after the discovery of the bones in Cheddar Gorge in 1987.
    The new findings shed fresh light on ancient dwellers of the West Country.
    They are believed to have lived in a climate rather like modern Scotland, surviving by trapping animals in the gorge and drinking from its stream."
    Bones found in Somerset reveal cavemen's cannibalism | Daily Mail Online
     

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