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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. Mutley

    Mutley Active Member

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    Loving these skull discoveries and the rethinking that will have to happen.

    Here's a fossilized tree story, more rethinking about the origins of trees
    The world's first trees grew by splitting their guts | Science | AAAS
    www.sciencemag.org › news › 2017/10

    Gordon, I meant to say the article on the find of a new chamber in the great pyramid was exciting. Cant wait til they find out what's in it. Hope its not the boring construction chamber theory.

    I did apply for my aunts record but Glasgow couldn't find it Gordon. I think I may ask them to look again, but at different years of birth. For some reason she couldn't be found on the '39 Register either, when I applied to the National Records in Edinburgh. Gran was in Dumbarton and she'd shaved 4 years off her age!
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    China really wants to be their own branch of humanity.
     
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  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Good chance of you finding her real DoB here, Maria-
    ScotlandsPeople


    Was watching a programme along those lines recently.
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Mutley

    Mutley Active Member

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    Brilliant picture OP.

    Thanks Gordon, I had both her birth & death certificates before applying. Unfortunately she came from a long line of liars about their ages. Building the family tree was a nightmare. My great grandfather medal card in 1920 for his WW1 Merchant Navy service had him declaring he was born in 1864, when was born in 1857!
     
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  6. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Larry, have you read Macauley's "Motel of the Mysteries"? Looking at your cartoon brought it to mind.
     
  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Not heard of it.
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Human evolution was uneven and punctuated
    A new study in Heliyon suggests that Neanderthals survived at least 3,000 years longer in Spain than we thought
    Date: November 16, 2017
    Source: Elsevier
    Summary: Neanderthals survived at least 3,000 years longer than we thought in Southern Iberia -- what is now Spain -- long after they had died out everywhere else, according to new research.

    Neanderthals survived at least 3,000 years longer than we thought in Southern Iberia -- what is now Spain -- long after they had died out everywhere else, according to new research published in Heliyon.

    The authors of the study, an international team from Portuguese, Spanish, Catalonian, German, Austrian and Italian research institutions, say their findings suggest that the process of modern human populations absorbing Neanderthal populations through interbreeding was not a regular, gradual wave-of-advance but a "stop-and-go, punctuated, geographically uneven history."

    Over more than ten years of fieldwork, the researchers excavated three new sites in southern Spain, where they discovered evidence of distinctly Neanderthal materials dating until 37,000 years ago.

    "Technology from the Middle Paleolithic in Europe is exclusively associated with the Neanderthals," said Dr. João Zilhão, from the University of Barcelona and lead author of the study. "In three new excavation sites, we found Neanderthal artefacts dated to thousands of years later than anywhere else in Western Europe. Even in the adjacent regions of northern Spain and southern France the latest Neanderthal sites are all significantly older."

    Continues...
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    You should read it. It's hilarious. I used to use it to show some of the shortcomings of archeological interpretation. The drawings are excellent.
     
  10. Highway70

    Highway70 Member

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    There is a theory, by some non Archaeologist, that some Neanderthal communities survived into the Middle Ages. It is based on contemporary paintings of town Fairs in Europe. They claim that in earlier painting there are small numbers of people that look like Neanderthals. In later paintings they are depicted as people wearing costumes, but in earlier paintings they are depicted as real - not wearing costumes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2017
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Medieval art was quite fanciful.
     
  12. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Then there’s the Basque...
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ahem:

    [​IMG]

    "An der Stelle im Hein-Klink-Stadion habe früher ein großes Denkmal gestanden, sagte erste Vorsitzende des Sportvereins Billstedt-Horn, Joachim Schirmer. Es sei vor Jahrzehnten abgerissen worden."

    Gargle translate-ish: "At the place in the Hein Klink Stadium formerly stood a large monument, said first chairman of the sports club Billstedt Horn, Joachim Schirmer. It had been demolished decades ago."
     
  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The world’s first dog pictures, and looking at the planet from a quantum perspective

    [​IMG]
    (Podcast)
    "About 8000 years ago,
    people were drawing dogs with leashes, according to a series of newly described stone carvings from Saudi Arabia. Online News Editor David Grimm talks with Sarah Crespi about reporting on this story and what it says about the history of dog domestication.

    Sarah also interviews physicist Brad Marston of Brown University on surprising findings that bring together planetary science and quantum physics. It turns out that Earth’s rotation and the presence of oceans and atmosphere on its surface mean it can be described as a “topological insulator”— a term usually reserved for quantum phenomena. Insights from the study of these effects at the quantum level may help us understand weather and currents at the planetary level—including insights into climate change and exoplanets."
     
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  15. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Well, Yoolioos Kaiser's British invasion beach has been found at last. Or at least, one of them might have been. I actually do hope they're right though.
    "He was famed as the brutal Roman general who said is said to have 'came, saw and conquered' during his invasions.
    But exactly where Julius Caesar and his Roman legions landed in Britain has been a mystery until now.
    Archaeologists have pinpointed an obscure spot in Kent as the scene of the first encounter between Rome and ancient Britons.
    Pegwell Bay on the Isle of Thanet is believed to be where Caesar first attempted to land in 55 BC, and later more successfully in 54 BC.
    Now the site is more than half a mile inland – but at the time it was closer to the coast.
    The location matches Caesar's own account as it was visible from the sea with a large open bay and was overlooked by higher ground.
    His army immediately built a fort on the spot, and the researchers, from the University of Leicester, claim to have found the spot where it was built.
    Iron weapons, including a Roman javelin, and pottery dug up at the neighbouring hamlet of Ebbsfleet overlooking the bay suggests it was a Roman base dating to the first century BC.
    The base was around 50 acres in size and the main purpose would have been be to protect Caesar's fleet that had been drawn up on to the beach.
    Roadworkers who found signs of a large defensive ditch led to the realisation this was the likely spot where Caesar first set foot on British soil.
    The shape of the ditch was very similar to some of the Roman defences at Alesia in France, where the decisive battle in the Gallic War took place in 52 BC.
    Andrew Fitzpatrick, of the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology and Ancient History, said: 'The site at Ebbsfleet lies on a peninsular that projects from the south eastern tip of the Isle of Thanet.
    'Thanet has never been considered as a possible landing site before because it was separated from the mainland until the Middle Ages.
    'However, it is not known how big the Channel that separated it from the mainland, the Wantsum Channel, was."
    Landing site for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain found | Daily Mail Online
     
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  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Sea-level rise predicted to threaten more than 13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US
    Researchers analyzed heritage data integrated in the Digital Index of North American Archaeology
    Date: November 29, 2017
    Source: PLOS
    Summary: Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a new study.

    "Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a study published November 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Anderson from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA, and colleagues.

    To estimate the impact of sea-level rise on archaeological sites, the authors of the present study analyzed data from the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA). DINAA aggregates archaeological and historical data sets developed over the past century from numerous sources, providing the public and research communities with a uniquely comprehensive window into human settlement.

    Just in the remainder of this century, if projected trends in sea-level rise continue, the researchers predict that over 13,000 recorded archaeological sites in the southeast alone may be submerged with a 1 m rise in sea-level, including over 1,000 listed on the National Register of Historic Places as important cultural properties. Many more sites and structures that have not yet been recorded will also be lost.

    Large linked data sets, such as DINAA, that show what may be impacted and what could be lost across entire regions, are essential to developing procedures for sampling, triage, and mitigation efforts. Such research is essential to making accurate forecasts and public policy decisions about the consequences of rapid climate change, extreme weather events, and displaced populations. These are factors that could shape our civilization profoundly in the years to come."

    Continues....
     
  17. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Absolutely amazing-
    "The sunken city of the Caesars, lost for 1,700 years beneath waves off of Italy's west coast, has been revealed in stunning new photographs taken by divers who were allowed to explore the area.
    Baiae was the Las Vegas for the super-rich of the 1st Century's ancient Rome, covered in sprawling mansions and synonymous with luxury and wickedness, historians claim.
    But as time passed, much of it was lost to the sea as volcanic activity caused the coastline to retreat 400metres inland, forcing the entire city underwater into what is now the Gulf of Naples in modern-day Italy.
    The site has since been re-discovered, 1,700 years after disappearing beneath the waves on the west coast of Italy.
    Divers were allowed to explore the site recently and snapped photos of the treasures that can still be found at the underwater city.
    Antonio Busiello, who lives in Naples, photographed the site and found that roads, walls, mosaics and even statues had survived the ravages of time.
    The 45-year-old said: 'The beautiful mosaics, and the villas and temples that have reemerged or are still underwater show the opulence and wealth of this area.
    'It was considered one of the most important Roman cities for centuries. Pliny the Younger used to live here and from here, across the gulf, he witnessed and described the 79 AD eruption of Mount Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum.'
    In its heyday, Baiae was frequented by famous Romans including Julius Caesar, Nero, Pompey the Great, Marius, and Hadrian - who died there.
    Among the sights now visible are the Pisoni and Protiro villas, where intricate white mosaics as well as residential rooms can be seen.
    There's also the Nymphaeum of Punta Epitaffio, where divers swim among the statues of Ulysses and his helmsman Baius, for whom Baiae was named.
    A documentary released earlier this year, titled Rome's Sunken Secrets, followed a series of dives led by underwater archaeologist Dr Barbara Davidde and involving historians and scientists from across the world.
    They revealed vast villas, priceless statues and breathtaking mosaics, as well as heated spas, cobbled streets and even a nymphaeum – a grotto of pleasure – in the city that lies 150 miles south of Rome and 50 north of Pompeii."
    Sunken Roman city now lies beneath the waves off of Italy | Daily Mail Online
     
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  18. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    From what I can remember its rising again!
    The sunken part was the super sexy area - the rest of the city carried on...there were two parts or two cities divided by a bay that was eventually bridged...
     
  19. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Aye, the Romans did decadence good style.
    Lucky barstewards....
     
  20. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    The Poms were good students...they know debauchery and fun! And how to get drunk...Is Baiae latin for Essex? : )
     

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