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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    One for our transplanted Texican, Toto.

    Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more
    Date: April 11, 2019
    Source: University of Texas at Austin
    Summary: During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. The workers retrieved tens of thousands of specimens that have been studied in small bits and pieces while stored in the state collections of The University of Texas at Austin for the past 80 years. Now, decades after they were first collected, a researcher has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from dig sites near Beeville, Texas, and found that the fauna make up a veritable 'Texas Serengeti.'

    Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
    Paleontologists say mammal was larger than a polar bear
    Date: April 18, 2019
    Source: Ohio University
    Summary: Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.

    Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore: Paleontologists say mammal was larger than a polar bear
     
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  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA

    Date: April 18, 2019
    Source: Cell Press
    Summary: History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered.
     
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  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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  6. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "The oldest surviving footprint of humans in the Americas has been found, scientists claim in a new study.
    A single footprint, discovered in Chile, was found which dates back 15,600 years.
    Originally excavated in 2010, researchers have now ruled out animals and have confirmed that it belongs to an male adult human.
    Scientists say the fossil could provide new insights into the human colonisation of Patagonia, the sparsely populated region shared by Chile and Argentina.
    The footprint was found at the Pilauco excavation site in the city of Osorno in south-central Chile where scientists have been digging since 2007.
    Scientists think it is a straight down imprint that belongs to a barefooted adult human who was of 'light body weight'.
    It was discovered alongside fossil bones and tools and its date was established by using radiocarbon dating of organic plant material also present.
    To establish whether its owner was human or animal, scientists performed foot printing test by stepping into similar soil - with moisture added back in - at different angles and pressures.
    The reconstruction used three different human barefoot print-makers with similar foot size but different height and weight."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6971283/Human-footprint-Chile-oldest-Americas.html
     
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  7. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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  8. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ta. Tried to post that link but me laptop's playing up.
     
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  9. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "The Roman conquest of Britain 2,000 years ago is one of the most important events recorded in history - but exactly where Julius Caesar landed, and the precise route he then took, has remained a mystery.
    All that could change after the discovery of four military camps in Kent and Essex - which form a straight line from his landing zone to the point of combat with a Celtic chieftain.
    Many historians believe the Roman army first set foot on British soil in 55BC at Walmer; and that the second invasion, in 54BC, began at nearby Deal - both on the south-east coast, halfway between Ramsgate and Dover. From there, it was assumed Caesar crossed the Thames at Brentford.
    But new evidence suggests that, for his first invasion, Caesar crossed the river at East Tilbury after landing at Dover - in a manoeuvre that followed a line through temporary 'marching camps' at Denge Wood, Kemsley, East Tilbury and Loughton.
    These camps would accommodate personnel, along with their equipment, animals, and a headquarters. They could be used defensively - as a secure base to which an army could retreat; and offensively - as a staging area for assaults."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6994203/Julius-Caesar-landed-Dover-crossed-Thames-East-Tilbury-Roman-invasion.html
     
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  11. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "A royal burial site found beneath a roadside verge in Essex has been named one of the most significant archaeological finds ever made in England.
    Discovered between a pub and an Aldi supermarket, it is thought to be the burial chamber of the brother of Anglo-Saxon King Saebert.
    Despite its unglamorous location, inside the chamber are 40 artefacts thought to have belonged to the ancient Essex prince Saexa.
    These include gold foil crosses placed on his eyes when he died, as well as coins and weapons.
    The Anglo-Saxons were Pagans, but the Christian items found in the chamber suggest the religion was still important in England 1,400 years ago.
    Experts are fascinated by this time in English history as Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were emerging, with separate royal families in different parts of the country.
    The name Essex comes from the East Saxon families which ruled over this part of England.
    Researchers behind the find have hailed it as the 'British equivalent of Tutankhamun's tomb' - despite little similarities in appearance.
    Just like Tutankhamun's famous tomb in Egypt, however, it is completely intact, with looters and 19th Century amateur archaeologists having been unable to find it as the mound on top of it collapsed."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7006809/Ancient-royal-burial-site-Anglo-Saxon-King-Saebert-discovered.html
     
  12. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Triple-decker: how the Mary Rose had room for 500 men
    A new book shows how, to house its massive crew, Henry VIII’s favourite warship had one more deck than was originally thought
    Triple-decker: how the Mary Rose had room for 500 men

    Sounds like a good read.
     
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  13. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Ancient DNA has been recovered from rudimentary chewing gum spat out by a Stone Age human who lived in Sweden around 10,000 years ago.
    The gum — which still bears the mark of its chewers' teeth - was made from tar created from the bark of birch trees.
    The DNA the people left behind in their gum is the oldest known human DNA from Scandinavia, a region that has produced few human skeletal remains so far.
    Analysis suggests that, despite using tools of eastern hunter-gatherer origin, the gum chewers were related to more western populations.
    'This supports the theory that culture and genetic imports into Scandinavia came from two distinct routes — one from western Europe and the other from the east, in what is today Russia.
    The lumps of ancient chewing gum were unearthed from an archaeological site called Huseby-Klev, located on the west coast of Sweden, which has been dated back to around 10,000 years ago
    The early Mesolithic hunter-fisher peoples that lived at Huseby-Klev made the chewing gum from birch bar tar.
    Along with being chewed, this material was also used by Stone Age peoples as a glue for the production of tools and other technologies.
    Researchers from the University of Oslo and Stockholm University found that the DNA in the gum had been left behind by three individuals, specifically two women and a man.
    Imprints of the three chewers' teeth can still be seen in some of the gum pieces."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7035605/Oldest-Scandinavian-human-DNA-CHEWING-GUM-birch-tar-10-000-years-ago-Sweden.html
     
  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, research on teeth shows
    Date: May 15, 2019
    Source: University College London
    Summary: Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research.


    Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic.

    The research, published in Science Advances, analysed dental evolutionary rates across different hominin species, focusing on early Neanderthals. It shows that the teeth of hominins from Sima de los Huesos, Spain -- ancestors of the Neanderthals -- diverged from the modern human lineage earlier than previously assumed.

    Sima de los Huesos is a cave site in Atapuerca Mountains, Spain, where archaeologists have recovered fossils of almost 30 people. Previous studies date the site to around 430,000 years ago (Middle Pleistocene), making it one of the oldest and largest collections of human remains discovered to date.

    Dr Aida Gomez-Robles (UCL Anthropology), said: "Any divergence time between Neanderthals and modern humans younger than 800,000 years ago would have entailed an unexpectedly fast dental evolution in the early Neanderthals from Sima de los Huesos."

    "There are different factors that could potentially explain these results, including strong selection to change the teeth of these hominins or their isolation from other Neanderthals found in mainland Europe. However, the simplest explanation is that the divergence between Neanderthals and modern humans was older than 800,000 years. This would make the evolutionary rates of the early Neanderthals from Sima de los Huesos roughly comparable to those found in other species."​

    Continues.
     
  15. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Back when I was in school I remember (70's) I read about a skull form South Africa that looked like a Neanderthal. Current theory is that they weren't in Africa though. Not sure how they account for said skull.
     
  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ask Lee Berger, at the University of the Witwatersrand.
     
  17. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "A 2,300-year-old Iron Age shield has been revealed by archaeologists.
    Found during a dig near Leicester in 2015 and dated to between 395 and 255BC, the shield was made of painted bark, backed by wooden spars.
    Analysis showed it had been badly damaged, probably by spears and edged weapons, before being left in a pit.
    Experts said the shield gave an "unparalleled" insight into prehistoric technology.
    The shield, which measured 670 x 370mm ( 26" x15") , was found on the Everards Meadows site near the M1 by University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) archaeologists.
    The bark used was from either alder, willow, poplar, hazel or spindle and the stiffening spars were made of apple, pear, quince or hawthorn.
    The shield had a rim of split hazel rod and a boss, to protect the hand, woven from a willow core."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-england-leicestershire-48377927?__twitter_impression=true&fbclid=IwAR14PKrHTVqTIkdysxRFSEOcfL2TTLOf-ptfiZ47AxQOO8zq6ycxApz99sk
     
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  18. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Obviously carried by an Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.
     
  19. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "A Montana man’s DNA has been traced back 55 generations with 99 percent accuracy, according to the ancestry company, CRI Genetics, that tested him. This means that the man’s ancestors were in North America 17,000 years ago.
    Darrell “Dusty” Crawford, who is Native American, has said he was taught in school that his ancestors, the Blackfeet Native Americans, used the Bering Land Bridge during the Ice Age to reach the Americas. However, his DNA testing contained another surprise: It seems that Crawford’s ancestors are from the Pacific Islands. From there they presumably traveled along the coast of South America into what is now North America, data suggests.
    The length of Crawford’s lineage is so rare that the company told Crawford’s family that this kind of success was “like finding Big Foot.” The DNA test focused on mitachondrial DNA and Crawford’s line of female ancestors."
    www.thevintagenews.com/2019/05/23/oldest-dna-in-america/

    And more on the Romans in Scotland-
    "ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered fresh evidence of a Roman invasion of Scotland under an Ayrshire playing field.
    A marching camp used by the Legions as they made their way along the coast was found by a team carrying out work prior to the building of the new Ayr Academy.
    It is thought to date back to the first century AD, when an army under Agricola, the Roman Governor of Britain, fought its way up to Aberdeenshire and defeated an army of Caledonians at the battle of Mons Grampius.
    It was previously thought the only two known routes for the Roman invasion were further to the east; the present-day M74 and A68 roads follow these same courses.
    But the new marching camp at Ayr reveals another route down the west coast towards the south-west tip of Scotland, from where Ireland is readily visible.
    The discovery was made during archaeological excavations undertaken by GUARD Archaeology, but only became apparent upon post-excavation analyses and radiocarbon dating."
    www.heraldscotland.com/news/17663920.archaeologists-find-remains-of-the-roman-invasion-of-ayrshire/
     
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  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    55 x 20 = 17,000?
     
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