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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I did see that, but was it because it's the brightest constellation, or was there another reason. He doesn't really explain it.
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Why doesn't anyone just ask?

    Oh, wait...
     
  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Found this-
    "In 2004, the site was officially named the Karahunj (Carahunge) Observatory, by Parliamentary decree (Government decision No. 1095-n, July 29, 2004)...
    ...Seventeen of the stones were associated with observations of sunrise or sunset at the solstices and equinoxes, and 14 with the lunar extremes.[6] However, this must remain conjectural as the holes are relatively unweathered and may not even be prehistoric in origin.[7]"
    Carahunge - Wikipedia

    Does all seem to be a bit New Age.
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ah.
     
  5. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Bet a frantic search has just started in every museum archive on the planet!
    "A new species of dinosaur has been discovered, after being misidentified and kept in a museum collection for several decades.
    The dinosaur's remains, which were found in South Africa in 1978 and were being kept in a collection at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, had been identified as a Massospondylus -- a dinosaur from the Early Jurassic period.
    However, after a team of researchers from London's Natural History Museum and the University of Witwatersrand reassessed the specimen, they realized the bones and skull belonged to an entirely new species.
    Dinosaur researcher Paul Barrett and PhD student Kimberley Chapelle at the Natural History Museum worked to identify the new dinosaur.
    "My colleagues over the years have looked at it, but they'd always thought it was an unusual example of this very common dinosaur, Massospondylus, which is very well known from South Africa," Barrett told CNN.
    The researchers confirmed that the dinosaur was in fact not what it seemed by comparing the specimen with other Massospondylus fossils."
    https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/new-dinosaur-intl-scli-gbr-scn/index.html
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Alas, the poor Brontosaurus...
     
  7. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Life in high-altitude mountains can be rough. Resources are scarce, the weather can be extreme and oxygen levels hover at dangerously low levels. Archaeologists have thus assumed that towering mountains and plateaus were among the last places to be populated by ancient humans. But a new study suggests that this assumption could be wrong.
    Published in the journal Science, the research details a remarkable discovery in Ethiopia’s Bale Mountains at a site located more than 11,000 feet above sea level. There, a team of experts unearthed a trove of artifacts—among them stone tools, clay fragments, burnt animal bones and a glass bead—indicating that people had lived there as early as 47,000 years ago. These finds, according to the study, represent “the earliest evidence of a prehistoric high-altitude [human] residential site.”
    For decades, paleoanthropologists working in east Africa have been concentrating their attention on lower-altitude locations. “We were simply the first to go higher,” Götz Ossendorf, an archaeologist at the University of Cologne and lead author of the new study, tells Carl Zimmer of the New York Times. But reaching Fincha Habera, as the site of the new discovery is known, was no mean feat. The research team had to trek more than 700 miles on foot and by pack horse to get to the site.
    The effort was worth it. At Fincha Havera—one of more than 300 elevated rock shelters that the researchers investigated—they quickly dug up signs of ancient human occupation. Crucial to their discovery were the remnants of hearths, which provided charcoal that could be dated to between 47,000 and 31,000 years ago, according to Zimmer."
    www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/found-earliest-evidence-high-altitude-home-humans-180972878/#DZOK31qKH1h0CPeS.99
     
  8. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Hmmm...living there is not the same as staying there for a period...There could be reasons for these places other than "living"...Could be batchelors hung out there to avoid being hunted...or a place to stash stuff without it getting pilfered...or a place to bring an "abducted" female...if you think about it there could be many reasons to have a "safe place" available. I doubt it was from "choice"...having to go all the way down and bring food all the way up...there must have been a good reason...
     
  9. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Could have been a "hunting lodge" of some kind.
     
  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    It does say it wasn't permanently settled, but still frequently used. There's plenty evidence for food availability locally..
    I reckon this is the key though-
    "They also seemed to have been using nearby obsidian outcrops to make their tools."
    So not settled all year round, but when?
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    When food wasn't hard to find there.
     
  12. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    But interesting that the arrival of a certain food source (a type of rodent) always seemed to overlap with a sudden need for obsidian tools.
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    OR they were trapping the rodents and making tools while they were waiting for the traps to be sprung.
     
  14. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Archaeologists excavating on Mount Zion in Jerusalem have uncovered evidence of the Babylonian conquest of the city, appearing to confirm a Biblical account of its destruction.
    Academics from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte made significant finds, including ash deposits, arrowheads and broken pieces of pots and lamps. The most surprising discovery, however, was an item of jewelry, which appears to be a tassel or earring with a bell-shaped upper portion, the researchers said.
    Shimon Gibson, co-director of the university's Mount Zion archaeological project, told CNN that the recovery of the rare piece of jewelry is the first time that archaeologists have uncovered signs of the "elites," appearing to confirm Biblical descriptions of Jerusalem's wealth prior to the conquest in 587-586 BC.
    Gibson said jewelry is a rare find at conflict sites as warriors would normally loot it and melt it down. It is a "clear indication of the wealth of the inhabitants of the city at the time of the siege," he said."
    https://edition.cnn.com/travel/arti...lonian-conquest-evidence-intl-scli/index.html
     
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    One swallow doesn't make it Spring.
     
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  16. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "A stone carved by Picts 1,200 years ago has been discovered in the Highlands.
    Archaeologists said the find is of national importance because it is one of only about 50 complete Pictish cross-slabs known to exist.
    Decorated with a number of symbols, the stone was uncovered at an early Christian church site near Dingwall.
    It was used as a grave marker in the 1790s and discovered hidden in vegetation by Anne MacInnes of North of Scotland Archaeological Society.
    The Picts created cross-slabs - intricately decorated standing stones - and also constructed impressive hill forts to defend themselves against rival tribes and invaders.
    They battled against the Romans, Angles and the Vikings.
    Archaeologists believe the newly-found stone would have originally measured more than two metres (6ft) tall. Just over a metre of it survives.
    It is decorated with a number of Pictish designs including several mythical beasts, oxen, an animal headed warrior with sword and shield, and symbols called a double disc and a z rod.
    Experts said the carvings appeared to have more in common with Pictish stones found in Perthshire than those previously found in Easter Ross."
    www.bbc.com/news/amp/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-49446609?__twitter_impression=true&fbclid=IwAR236ScwGzAHZsKWr1eVJSmZR8BhYcSwvcg3tiiltUM8AfR46btXI4wx58A
     
  17. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "A seventh-century sarcophagus containing the well-preserved remains of an elderly woman with arthritis has been found in Cahors, south-western France, while the area was being dug up to be redeveloped.
    The sarcophagus consisted of "a simple limestone tank covered with a roof with four-sided gable roof" and "sealed by a mortar joint".
    The skeleton of the woman, reportedly from the Merovingian era, was "an elderly female individual, testifying to osteoarthritis problems…buried without personal effect", according to an official statement from the Lot Department.
    The site was discovered in July near St Bartholomew’s church on the same grounds where historians believe there is a monastery founded by the Merovingian royal official Didier of Cahors in the seventh century.
    "The sarcophagus was located within the confines of this monastery and it seems that it was exposed in a place of passage," according to Lot officials.
    New excavations since the skeleton find have unearthed a number of Merovingian pottery remains and what is believed to be traces of an old kitchen.
    The latest finds will be examined by archaeologists from the French National Institute for Preventative Archaeological Research (INRAP) at the Henri-Martin museum in Cahors, where they will be housed."
    7th century Merovingian skeleton unearthed in Cahors
     
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  18. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    A 3.8-million-year-old hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia | Nature

    A 3.8-million-year-old hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia

    The cranial morphology of the earliest known hominins in the genus Australopithecus remains unclear. The oldest species
    in this genus (Australopithecus anamensis, specimens of which have been dated to 4.2–3.9 million years ago) is known
    primarily from jaws and teeth, whereas younger species (dated to 3.5–2.0 million years ago) are typically represented
    by multiple skulls. Here we describe a nearly complete hominin cranium from Woranso-Mille (Ethiopia) that we date
    to 3.8 million years ago. We assign this cranium to A. anamensis on the basis of the taxonomically and phylogenetically
    informative morphology of the canine, maxilla and temporal bone. This specimen thus provides the first glimpse of the
    entire craniofacial morphology of the earliest known members of the genus Australopithecus. We further demonstrate
    that A. anamensis and Australopithecus afarensis differ more than previously recognized and that these two species
    overlapped for at least 100,000 years—contradicting the widely accepted hypothesis of anagenesis.
     
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  19. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "Remnants from the final battle in the English Civil War have been uncovered for the first time.
    A host of items, including musket balls, horse harness fittings and belt buckles were found during a dig at the site in Powick, Worcestershire.
    It has long been known to be the site of the famous battle which saw Charles II defeated by Oliver Cromwell's Roundheads but this marks the first physical evidence.
    Analysis of the artefacts from the 1651 battle will now be conducted to see if the 350-year-old items reveal any more secrets.
    The battle was contested between the English monarchy, the cavaliers who believed in the divine right and rule of the king, and Oliver Cromwell's government.
    Roadworks at the Worcester Southern Link Road site made the dig possible near the Powick Church, still scarred by the battle's bullets.
    The find totalled 98 individual items which were buried deep at the bottom of a river valley.
    They had been covered by centuries of flood deposits and sediment but archaeologists sifted through the soil to find the precious pieces of English history. "
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7426099/Musket-balls-sword-hilts-belt-buckles-discovered-site-Battle-Worcester.html
     
  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Don't tell me who won, I'm still reading.
     

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