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How did the Dutch East Indies continue on after the fall of the Netherlands?

Discussion in 'War in the Pacific' started by A-58, Dec 18, 2019.

  1. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    I've always wondered about this. When the Germans overran the Netherlands in 1940 and forcing their surrender, how could their possessions continue operating? Supplies, replacements, soldiers pay, etc.,were not going to keep coming from the home country. So how did they manage their continued operations? And why didn't the Germans demand that their colonies surrender as well?

    I understand that there was a different status in the relationship of Vichy France, allowing the Japanese to occupy French Indo-China. But the status of the Netherlands East Indies until the collapse of the ABDA in early 1942 is something I am not familiar with. Any help gents?
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    At first the occupations were "regrettably necessary". Germany wanted to be the victim and being polite to occupied countries was meant to foster that. The question of colonial administration in S.E.A. was moot after Dec. 7th, of course.
     
  3. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    The DEI had considerable oil reserves and other valuable strategic and non strategic materials so I imagine cash initially was not so great a issue, reserve ammunition and spare parts are another subject.
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    They also told the Japanese that all the well heads had been rigged with explosives.
     
  5. Carronade

    Carronade Ace Patron  

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    Let's not forget that the Dutch government went into exile in Britain, continued the war against Germany to the best of its ability, and retained its legal authority over the East Indies. Notably, it was the government in London which agreed with the United States to participate in the oil embargo against Japan.

    I don't know much about it (hopefully some knowledgeable folks will chime in) but I expect the DEI were self-sufficient in basic commodities. They were also the third-largest producer of oil and had other resources such as rubber, quinine, and luxuries like sugar, coffee, and tea to generate cash income.

    As for military equipment, I know the British gave considerable help. Two of the new N class destroyers were transferred to the Royal Netherlands Navy, and several Dutch ships which had escaped to Britain in 1940 were completed/refitted as necessary and put into service. I expect the US helped also to the extent that we could; our neutrality had a pro-Allied bias, and as noted FDR sought to enlist the Dutch in our sanctions against Japan.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2019
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  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    " Notably, it was the government in London which agreed with the United States to participate in the oil embargo against Japan."

    Britain didn't have oil to spare and needed more. Not hard to agree with the US there.
     

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