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How to operate an artillery battery ?

Discussion in 'WW2|ORG - WWII Open Resource Group' started by PirO63, Jun 7, 2024.

  1. PirO63

    PirO63 New Member

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    Hello everyone, I am conducting research on an artillery battalion during a World War 2 and I would like to understand how this type of unit works.
    For example, how were the soldiers distributed because not all of them were at the cannons and what did he do in that case ?
    Could it act as infantry when necessary ?
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Oh, and "Every soldier is an infantryman first, their specialty comes second."
     
  4. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    What Opana said, but also:

    Which Battalion? There were many types of artillery battalions.
    Whose Battalion? There were many countries fighting.
    When? It was a long war.
    Where? It was a world-wide war.

    All matter to the answer.
     
  5. PirO63

    PirO63 New Member

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    This is Battery C of the 7th Field Artillery Battalion of the 1st Infantry Division during the Normandy campaign.
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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  7. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Okay then. The 7th FA was part of the 16th Infantry Regimental Combat Team. For D-Day it was part of Force O with 476 O & EM and 88 vehicles. Basically that was its firing sections, 12 of them, with four to each battery, and a small detachment from HQ & HQ Battery and Service Battery, the bare minimum to be able to fire in support of the 16th Infantry. One major complication was the landing plan restricted the number of standard wheeled vehicles landing under the assumption they would bog down in the sand. The solution, in part, was to land separate self-propelled battalions attached to the assault divisions, but they required more LCT. which complicated things. On UTAH, two of the 4th Infantry Division FA battalions were re-equipped with 105mm SP, but the 1st Division took a different route. They mounted their M2A1 105mm howitzers in the cargo hold of DUKW amphibious trucks. That unfortunately led to 7 of the 12 being lost in rough seas on the run in, so it was a few days before the battalion was fully effective.
     

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