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Is This General Gudin's Last Resting Place?

Discussion in 'Military History' started by GRW, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    I would wait 'til the DNA analysis has been done, personally.

    "A 200-year mystery that has endured since the Napoleonic wars in Russia may finally have been solved.
    The location of the remains of a French general who died during Napoleon's 1812 campaign in Russia had never been found but they may now finally have been unearthed.
    Charles Etienne Gudin was hit by a cannonball in the Battle of Valutino near Smolensk, a city west of Moscow close to the border with Belarus.
    His leg was amputated and he died three days later from gangrene, aged 44.
    The French army cut out his heart, now buried at the Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris, but the site of the rest of his remains was never known, until researchers found a likely one-legged skeleton this summer.
    DNA analysis is ongoing and is expected to confirm the match.
    'As soon as I saw the skeleton with just one leg, I knew that we had our man,' the head of the Franco-Russian team that discovered the remains in July, Marina Nesterova, told AFP.
    Genetic analysis is being carried out to confirm the identity, using DNA from one of the general's descendants, with the results to be announced today."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7402371/Mystery-remains-Napoleonic-Army-general-finally-solved.html
     
  2. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    *bumped for an update.
    "DNA tests in France have confirmed the one-legged skeleton discovered earlier this year is that of Charles Etienne Gudin, it is reported. The 44-year-old general died after being hit by a cannonball during the Battle of Valutino on 19 August 1812 near Smolensk in western Russia. French newspaper Le Point said that DNA from the body in Russia matches his brother, Pierre C├ęsar Gudin, also a general."
    www.express.co.uk/news/world/1200710/Napoleon-news-remains-found-Russia-general-Charles-Etienne-Gudin
     

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