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Japanese Airborne Troops, 1944-45

Discussion in 'Japanese WWII Uniforms and Equipment' started by Jim, Oct 20, 2007.

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  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    #1:
    Takasago guerrilla, Kaoru Airborne Raiding Detachment; Clark Field, Luzon, November 26,1944 ​


    Lightly equipped for his one-way mission, this raider wears a camouflage cover and net on his standard issue steel helmet, and standard field uniform, here with the rank patches of first class private. Enlisted ranks wore a white armband on the right arm for night identification, and NCOs and officers a white sash from shoulder to hip. They were armed with Type 99 short rifles and Type 99 LMGs; many carried extra LMG magazines in canvas and leather pouches slung on the hip. The Formosan tribesmen also carried their traditional giyuto sidearm. Demolition charges and grenades were carried in chest haversacks; pistols, ammunition and grenades in Type 1 bandoleers; rations and small kit items in a second haversack on the right hip, with a water canteen; and a rolled shelter cape was slung on the back.

    #2:
    Paratrooper, 2nd Raiding Brigade; Clark Field, Luzon,
    December 6, 1944 ​


    For the December 6 raid on the Burauen airfields, elements of 3rd & 4th Raiding Regts wore new equipment and, for the first time, jumped carrying their primary weapons. The cloth-covered helmet and the clothing were unchanged. Apart from Type 2 rifle, Type 99 LMG or Type 100 SMG ammunition, each man carried two hand grenades, two AT grenades, two smoke candles, two Type 99 magnetic charges, six demolition charges, a shovel and 100 feet of rope. Take-down weapons were divided between two leg bags, and additional haversacks were sewn to wide bands encircling the ankles. When the canopy opened the paratrooper pulled a quick-release knot in the tapes securing the leg bags, and lowered them on 3m ropes. This man is stowing three-clip cartons of rifle ammunition. His parachute is the new Type 4 (1944.)

    #3:
    Volunteer, Giretsu Airborne Unit; Kengun airfield, Kyushu, May 24,1945 ​


    The unit were photographed on the airfield before embarking. They wore field caps rather than helmets, and tropical field uniforms self-camouflaged with streaks of black and dark green paint. At least one man in each of the three-man teams that made up each section carried a pole charge. Each man carried a canteen, a haversack with rations, and a backpack for the Type 99 charges. The often pictured “Type 2 bandoleer” was in fact a leather service belt reversed and fitted with canvas pouches for Type 99 grenades, a canvas pistol holster and three-pocket pistol magazine pouch.

    #4: Unidentified patch
    This insignia was reported in 1944; it may be IJA, but its exact meaning and use are unconfirmed.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Kelly War44

    Kelly War44 New Member

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    That could well be just a unit insignia. But very intriguing:thumb:
     
  3. Buford

    Buford New Member

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    Never seen that design before Jim. Will become a personal quest now to uncover its secrets! :cheers::thumb:
     
  4. AzraelValley

    AzraelValley New Member

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    Great pictures

    Each picture is representing a different kind of soldier, I wonder where could you gotten them. In those days, a camera is not likely to be seen around!:blue:
     

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