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Japanese Carriers

Discussion in 'The War at Sea' started by Mutant Poodle, Mar 27, 2004.

  1. Mutant Poodle

    Mutant Poodle New Member

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    The smallest to the biggest.
     
  2. Mutant Poodle

    Mutant Poodle New Member

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    Ooops!!

    Can someone start a new forum topic, "War in the Pacific"?!

    Please.
     
  3. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    We allready have a thread going on the Pacific War somewhere.

    But Japanese carriers is an interesting topic, so why not stick to that.

    Japanese aircraft carriers :

    - Akagi : completed in 1927, 42000 tons, 260.6m long, speed : 31 knots, crew : 1340. She could carry more than 60 aircraft, her airgroup in June 1942 consisted of 21 A6M fighters, 21 D3A dive-bombers and 21 B5N torpedo-bombers. She was lost in the Battle of Midway. Took part in the attack on Pearl Harbour.

    - Kaga : completed in 1928, 38200 tons, 247.6m long, speed : 28.5 knots, crew : 2016 men. She could carry as many as 90 aircraft in all. She also took part in the attack on Pearl Harbour, and was sunk during the Battle of Midway.

    - Hosho : Japan´s first carrier, completed in 1922. 10000 tons, 168.1m long, speed : 25 knots, crew : 550 men. She could carry 11 or 12 aircraft, usually B5N torpedo-bombers. She was withdrawn from service in 1942 and survived the war.

    - Shokaku : completed in 1941, 32000 tons, 257.5m long, speed : 34.2 knots, crew : 1660 men. She usually carried 72 aircraft ( 27 fighters, 27 dive-bombers and 18 torpedo-bombers ). She took part in the attack on Pearl Harbour, the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons. She was sunk by the U.S. submarine U.S.S. Cavalla during the Battle of the Philippine Sea on 19 June 1944.

    - Zuiho : completed in 1941, 14200 tons, 204.8m long, speed : 28.2 knots, crew : 785 men, 30 aircraft. She was part of the support force during the Battle of Midway ( and escaped destruction ), took part in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, the Battle of the Philppine Sea and in the fighting around Leyte Gulf where she was sunk in the Battle of Cape Engano.

    - Taiho : completed in 1944, 29300 tons, 260.5m long, speed : 33 knots, crew 2150 men, 75 aircraft ( 30 D4Y dive-bombers, 27 A6M fighters and 18 B6N torpedo-bombers ) Considered the most advanced Japanese carrier of the war. Took part in the Battle of the Philippine Sea where she was hit by one torpedo from the U.S. submarine U.S.S. Albacore. The torpedo did little damage, but ruptured Taiho´s fuel tanks which , probably by some kind of mishap, caused an explosion five hours later and sunk her.

    - Ryujo : completed in 1933, 14000 tons, 180m long, speed : 29 knots, crew : 924 men, 36 aircraft ( usually 24 A6M fighters and 12 bombers ). Took part in the Battle of the Eastern Solomons. Sunk by aircraft from U.S. carriers U.S.S. Enterprise and U.S.S. Saratoga on 24 august 1942.

    - Zuikaku : completed in 1941, 32000 tons, 257.5m long, speed : 34 knots, crew : 1660, 72 aircraft ( 27 fighters, 27 dive-bombers and 18 torpedo-bombers ). Took part in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of the Eastern Solomons. She was sunk in the Battle of the Cape Engano.

    - Shoho : completed in 1942, 14200 tons, 204.8m long, speed : 28 knots, crew : 785 men, 30 aircraft. Sunk by aircraft from U.S.S. Yorktown in the Battle of the Coral Sea.

    - Junyo class; Junyo and Hiyo : completed in 1942, 26950 tons, 219.2m long, speed : 25 knots, crew : 1220 men, 53 aircraft. Junyo took part in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, where she played a significant role in the sinking of U.S.S. Hornet, and in the Battle of the Philippine Sea. She survived the war. Hiyo was sunk in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

    - Unryu class; Amagi, Katsuragi and Unryu, completed in 1944, 22550 tons, 227.2m long, speed : 32-34 knots, crew : 1450 men, 64 aircraft. Amagi was sunk during an air raid in July 1945, Unryu wa sunk by the U.S. submarine U.S.S. Redfish in December 1944, Katsugari survived the war. Three more carriers in this class was laid down; Aso, Ikoma and Kasagi, but these were to my knowledge never completed.

    - Taiyo class escort carriers; Taiyo, Unyo and Chuyo : completed in 1941, 17850 tons, 180.1m long, crew : 800, 27 aircraft. All were lost to submarine attacks between December 1943 and September 1944. Taiyo was sunk by U.S.S. Rasher, Unyo was sunk by U.S.S. Barb and Chuyo by U.S.S. Sailfish.

    - Hiryu : 17300 tons, speed : 34 knots. 63 aircraft. Lost in the Battle of Midway.

    - Soryu : 18000 tons, speed : 34.5 knots, 63 aircraft. Lost in the Battle of midway.


    Other aircraft carriers include : Chitose, Ibuki, Kaiyo, Ryubo, Shinyo, Taibo and Zuibo.


    One last aircraft carrier which deserves mentioning despite that it was never completed is Shinano. She was sunk by a U.S. submarine in November 1944. She was created from the third of the Yamato class battleships. With her 72000 tons and lenght of 265.8m she would have been the largest aircraft carrier of WWII by far.
     
  4. liang

    liang New Member

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    Vow

    We are not worthy!!
    I tend to get bore quickly with aircraft carriers, but great job of summarizing for us less educated folks.
     
  5. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    I find the whole concept of the aircraft carrier intriguing, which is why I´m so fascinated by the Pacific War. The Battle of Midway is allmost like a thriller to me.
     
  6. Mutant Poodle

    Mutant Poodle New Member

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    Wow, we are not worthy is right!

    Thanxs for the fine research work.
     
  7. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    the Shinano was sunk by the tropedoes from the U.S.S. Archer-fish, and one of the resaosn it sunk was the lack of water tight doors and the inexperienced damage control crews.
    I think there are only 2 known photos from the Shinano, an american B 29 in recon took one in November 1 1944 in Yokosuka and a civilian took another in November 12 1944 during the carrier steering trials, it was taken from a tug.
     
  8. Mutant Poodle

    Mutant Poodle New Member

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    You are telling me that this warship did not have water tight doors?!!
    Good God, I hope the engineers wewre fired for this rather silly oversite.
     
  9. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    belive it or not, that is the true but sad true :oops:
     
  10. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    the japs had in mind to install them latter, sorry big mistake,what in the heck they were thinking off :angry: :angry: , brain dead :roll:
     
  11. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    Yeah, I read about that. They moved the Shinano from one port to another for her final fittings, which included the installment of her water tight doors. I can´t even begin to imagine the embarrassment of whoever made that decision. I believe the Shinano would have survived the sub-attack if her water tight doors had been installed. She had been hailed in the Japanese press as the super-carrier which would save Japan from defeat, and her demise was kept a close secret from the Japanese public.
     
  12. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    Really sweet summary, Skua. However you mentioned the Shokaku twice, once with detailed info and once without. I wonder why? Were there two Jap carriers called the same?

    However. There are a sweet lot of them in the Japanese navy, apparently. I never knew a country could support so many huge ships, noting that the US today have less than 20.
     
  13. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    Mentioning the Shokaku twice was an error. The less detailed entry, which I have removed, was actually from the "Taschenbuch der Kriegsflotten" 1943/44 edition and was probably the less accurate as well.
     
  14. corpcasselbury

    corpcasselbury New Member

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    There is a book, "Shinano!", written by the captain of USS ARCHERFISH about the carrier and his stalking and sinking her. They were moving the ship because they were afraid of the possibility of a B-29 raid damaging or destroying her. Read the book, it's good. The captain's name, BTW, is Joseph Enright.
     
  15. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

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    I have that book already :grin: :grin:
     
  16. corpcasselbury

    corpcasselbury New Member

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    The carrier TAIHO, in many ways, mirrored British carrier design. She had an armored flight deck and was very well protected. She was hit by one torpedo from the American submarine ALBACORE during the Battle of the Phillipine Sea. The hit didn't even slow her down, but a gasoline tank had been cracked and fumes were filling a neighboring department. A junior officer in charge of damage control decided to disperse the fumes by opening all of the ship's ventilators and running them full speed. Naturally, the fumes spread throughout the ship, a spark occured, and the ship blew up and sank with most of her crew.
     
  17. Mutant Poodle

    Mutant Poodle New Member

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    Ooops!
    Rewind!
     
  18. corpcasselbury

    corpcasselbury New Member

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    Interestingly enough, there was just enough time before the ship sank to transfer the Emperor's portrait to a destroyer, along with Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa, the carrier force commander.
     
  19. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    Sounds like a movie script. It wouldn't surprise me if this story is going to end up on celluloid soon.
     
  20. PMN1

    PMN1 recruit

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    Japanese carrier and fuel

    By this time the Japanese ships Taiho and Zuikakau included were also using very flammable unrefined fuel from Borneo which didn't help.

    The Taiho was similar to the RN's Illustrious clss in that it had an armoured flight deck but an opn hanger side as in US carriers and not a complte armoured hanger box, The armoured box was a good idea in theory (before radar) but if a bomb did get through via the lifts, the blast was contained inside the hanger. There was only one occasion where the bomb actually hit the armoured box, in every oher occasion it fell outside the box or onto the lift.

    http://warships1.com/index_tech/tech-030.htm

    Armoured flight decks are always a good way of starting an argument with the naval types!
     

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