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Japanese Smith & Wesson

Discussion in 'Small Arms and Edged Weapons' started by papabyrd, Aug 2, 2008.

  1. papabyrd

    papabyrd Member

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    [​IMG][​IMG][/IMG]A few weeks ago my best friend`s dad died and being son #2 to him he left me some guns & sword
    that he got fighting in WW2.I had seen this gun before but did not know that he had taken it from A Japnese Officer. It is a Smith & Wesson
    Prefected 38 S&W revolver. He would not talk about the war so I did not know the history of this gun untill after he had died. He took the sword, flag and the Smith all off the same officer. He was in the Philippines when MacArthur Came back for round 2 and took the Philippines back. So the Jap may have taken it off a G.I. or philippine officer when they took the philippines in round 1. who knows how he got it but he did have it.The gun has a 3" barrel, Blue with hard rubber grips with the S&W logo.The blueing is pretty good on the left side but real thin on the right Ser # 47540. Smith only made 59500 so I would think it was made about 1919 or 1920.[​IMG]
    http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh65/papabyrd53/JapaneseSmith004.jpg
    http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh65/papabyrd53/JapaneseSmith001.jpg
    http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh65/papabyrd53/JapaneseSmith002.jpg
    http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh65/papabyrd53/JapaneseSmith003.jpg
    http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh65/papabyrd53/JapaneseSmith006.jpg
     
  2. JCFalkenbergIII

    JCFalkenbergIII Expert

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    Just a heads up. Some here consider the term "Jap" to be derogatory. Perhaps you might like to use the word "Japanese" :).
     
  3. papabyrd

    papabyrd Member

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    Thanks for the info
     
  4. JCFalkenbergIII

    JCFalkenbergIII Expert

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    NP.
     
  5. JCFalkenbergIII

    JCFalkenbergIII Expert

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    True. Unfortunately not all feel that way. Nowadays some consider it the same as using the terms "Kraut" or "Hun" or "Nip". I for one have no problem with it used in a historical context. But IIRC some have been chided for using such terms before. :)
     
  6. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    What about le Sale Boche?
     
  7. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Trying to get back to the original topic, it's an interesting-looking weapon, but one I'm totally unfamiliar with.

    I'm guessing that it would have originally been a privately-purchased, as opposed to an issued gun ? :confused:

    I've been looking through my copy of Ezell and notice that the revolver looks very similar in general outline to the Smith & Wesson Hammerless Safety .38, assessed by the US Army in 1889. The Hammerless was issued in very limited numbers, and interestingly was criticised for being too well-made and complex, which it was felt would cause difficulties in field maintenance. Unfortunately, Ezell's book doesn't contain any info about the 'Prefected' model.....:(
     
  8. Devilsadvocate

    Devilsadvocate Ace

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    My guess would be that this was a privately purchased firearm. Many Japanese officers bought their pistols privately rather than rely on the issue firearms, particularly in the early part of the last century.

    You might want to write to the Smith & Wesson historical research service at; Weapon History Request - Smith & Wesson

    There is a $30 fee, but they can tell you when the weapon was manufactured and where it was shipped, and provide a letter of authenticity. if the firearm was ordered direct from the factory, they may be able to provide the original purchaser's name.
     
    Lippert likes this.

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