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La Cambe Cemetery

Discussion in 'La Cambe War Cemetery' started by Jim, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    In a clearing dotted with trees and Maltese crosses in groups of five, more than 21,222 men are buried here beneath small slabs. The fallen German soldiers from the Normandy campaign were scattered all over Normandy, many of them buried in isolated graves or small cemeteries. In the following years after the end of World War II, the Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge (German War Graves Commission), decided to establish six main German cemeteries in the Normandy area. More than 12,000 German soldiers were moved from 1,400 smaller locations to this cemetery in La Cambe. Since September 1961, the year when the cemetery was finished and inaugurated, more than 700 bodies of fallen soldeirs have been found on the battlefields of Normandy, and were moved to be burried here.
    In the centre of the cemetery stands an impressive tumulus, with on top a large cross flanked by statues. This marks the place where the remains of about 296 unidentified soldiers were burried.

    The impressive Tumulus is the first thing that you see when entering this Cemetery

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    The cemetery at La Cambe was set up by American troops who had a Field Hospital at La Cambe after taking the German Batteries and the Battle of Isigny. Since 1956 the work of the Volksbund has brought the number of graves to over 20.000 making La Cambe the largest war cemetery in the region.

    The Stones symbolize the the logo of the German "Volksbund"

    [​IMG]

    The cemetery is over seventeen and a half acres in size and is hemmed in by a 'Bocage' hedge-row with views over the marshes. Great trees, mainly Oak and Beech shade the lawns around a vast clearing. At the point where the two alleys cross is a tumulus six metres high, surmounted by a large cross of basalt between two statues. Groups of crosses and head-stones extend across the whole; paths on the turf are around these memorials. The rectangular building, the wall between the cemetery and the car-park and the alley of flag-stones leading to the Tumulus are the only elements in stone and they are in grey granite. The over-all effect is one of splendour it is impressive and meditative.

    The Tumulus marks the place where the remains of 296 German soldiers were interred.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. TxGirl

    TxGirl New Member

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  4. Cabel1960

    Cabel1960 recruit

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    Why are the German crosses black when all other Cemeteries dedicated to soldiers seem to be white?

    Great pictures Jim :thumb:
     
  5. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    The small groups of black stone crosses, are symbolic and do not mark graves. The graves are actually marked by flat stones engraved with the names below.....often with two, four or more burried together in the same grave. The Tumulus (1st & 3rd pictures) contains 296 dead. The grassed mound is ringed at the bottom by stones carrying the names of the dead, the huge black cross and two figures represents the parents of dead German Soldiers.

    The stones with the SS Soldiers names on do not show the ranks that these Soldiers were, i read at the site that this was for obvious reasons, of which i guess we know what these are.
     

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