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Laying Sea Mines

Discussion in 'Britain at Sea!' started by Jim, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Here a mine, complete with its sinking and anchoring apparatus is being dropped over the stern of a mine layer by the elaborate apparatus specially fitted. When it was dropped the vessel must have been moving at some speed, as the wake proves.

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    Britain Laid mines for the protection of her shipping and ports. The photographs in this page were taken on board a steamer which once carried holidaymakers on coastal trips, but was transformed into a mine layer in a surprisingly short time on the outbreak of war. A great splash follows the dropping of the mine into the sea, as can be seen in this photograph.

    The men of this minesweeper exercised their humour with a piece of chalk just as do the artillerymen on their shells; in the top photograph a quotation from a song ornaments the mine, while on that in the centre is a graphic expression of the hope that a U-boat will take the bait.

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  2. Jim

    Jim New Member

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    Minelaying Britain's coastal sea lanes.

    A mine being lowered on to a truck which will run it into the ship's hold. Later it will be ‘sown’ against enemy shipping.

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    A ‘horn’ being fixed to a mine. If one of these horns is touched by a vessel the mine will explode.

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    Duffle-coated sailors pushing mines to the stern of the minelayer ready for laying.

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    The mine hits the water after leaving the trap.

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