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Need help: Post-war U.S. troop transport to occupied Germany

Discussion in 'Information Requests' started by LisavettaZee, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. LisavettaZee

    LisavettaZee New Member

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    I'm doing research on whether the U.S. continued to use Britain as a jumping off point for entry into Germany in the early months (June, July, Aug 1945) after the war was over. Did any of the new U.S. occupying forces stop in the U.K. before entry? Or were they shipped straight to Germany (perhaps via Bremen port)? Or perhaps they were flown directly to U.S. installations in Germany?

    Any help on continued cooperation between U.S. and Britain allied transport methods (ship or plane or other) in the summer of 1945 is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    There would have been little reason to stop anywhere along the way. The green troops were replacing men who had been in the fighting, men who really wanted to get home.

    The UK was sending the Commonwealth troops who were due to be discharged back home in their ships. They were also preparing to fight it out in Burma and Malaya, as well as providing troops for Olympic (and building up for Coronet.)

    If that didn't make sense feel free to ask.
     
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  3. LisavettaZee

    LisavettaZee New Member

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    This is very helpful. Thank you!
     
  4. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    I believe the main issue during that time was how to send troops home or Japan, rather than sending more troops to Europe.

    Having said that, you may want to check the following official tome, "The US Army in the Occupation of Germany, 1944-1946". You may find your answer there. You can download a PDF version from the link. Otherwise, you can probably find a copy if you like the real thing.
     
  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    They had to have occupation troops, the situation was far from settled. There was also the issue of sending combat tested troops to the Pacific for Overlord. Those had to be replaced until we could turn the place over to the civilian governments pro tem.
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I can think of one situation where ships bound for Germany with troops would stop in the UK. That's if the cargo was food. They were still importing food at the time and we had produced a surplus of stock for the troops, even with Olympic figured in . Whether it was a unfriendly act to give them K-rations is another matter. :p
     
  7. LisavettaZee

    LisavettaZee New Member

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    Again, this is all helpful, so thank you.

    I should clarify that I am looking for the routes to Germany taken by the more "administrative" of the occupying forces. There seems to be a lot of information about how the battle-tested were shipped home or to the Pacific, but the clean and pressed administrators setting up MG and war crimes courts are the ones I'm interested in.

    The food cargo stop is EXACTLY the kind of obscure info I'm seeking. Bless you for that.
     
  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Looks like by the end of the war, the U.K. was off the table.I came across this snippet.
    When the war ended in Europe on May 8, 1945, the ETOUSA headquarters was located in Versailles, France, just outside Paris. As Eisenhower and his staff began to prepare for the occupation of Germany, the ETOUSA headquarters staff moved to Frankfurt, Germany, and co-located with the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces and the Office of Military Government, United States. ETOUSA was re-designated as U.S. Forces, European Theater (USFET) on July 1, 1945, with its headquarters remaining at Frankfurt.
    History | U.S. Army in Europe
     
  9. LisavettaZee

    LisavettaZee New Member

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    Thanks, Lou.

    So now we are thinking any MGs and newbies would have been shipped or flown to Frankfurt directly? If shipped, perhaps via the U.S. held port at Bremen?
     
  10. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Look at Tusa's Nuremberg Trials. I seem to recall something about how the major US players traveled. Maybe you can check it out.
     
  11. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    If shipped before mid-1946, the destination was La Havre, France. After that point, it would be Bremerhaven, Germany.
     
  12. LisavettaZee

    LisavettaZee New Member

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    I will check out Nuremberg Trials, and investigate La Havre as the incoming port.

    You all are my heroes. Thank you.
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    This may be useful as well: Civil Affairs: Soldiers Become Governors - U.S. Army Center of Military History
     

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