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Nice camouflage

Discussion in 'The War at Sea' started by Che_Guevara, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. Che_Guevara

    Che_Guevara New Member

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    Let´s have a look, hehe :wink:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Regards,
    Che.
     
  2. Ebar

    Ebar New Member

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    Second pictutre a U Boat attempts to torpedo her and instead ends up with a killer headache :D
     
  3. David.W

    David.W Active Member

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    lol :grin: :D
     
  4. Quillin

    Quillin New Member

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    damm the torpedo's, give me an asperine :grin:


    euhm :-? , who did say "damm the torpedo's"
     
  5. JCalhoun

    JCalhoun New Member

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    "Damn the torpedoes" was spoken by Union Navy ADM David Farragut at the Battle of Mobile Bay in Aug, 1864. There is a floating marker on top of the USS Tecumseh which struck the torpedo (called mines today) and sank as the Union Fleet made its move passed Fort Morgan and into the bay.
     
  6. Quillin

    Quillin New Member

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    so, if i understand your post correctly, torpedo's in those days were called mines in these days
     
  7. JCalhoun

    JCalhoun New Member

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    Exactly. The torpedoes were made of watertight wood barrels and were submerged just under the low tide water level. They had anchors holding them in place.

    When a vessel came along and hit it, a striker would puncture a primer inside the barrel setting off the explosive.

    They looked similar to a beer barrel with spikes sticking out of it.
     
  8. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    Gloire :

    [​IMG]

    Makes one wonder what the intention was.
     
  9. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    It is dazzle camoflage - it makes it very hard to tell what course the ship is on. It worked very well, if U-boot captains are to be believed.
     
  10. David.W

    David.W Active Member

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    That might be even more migraine inducing than the Nebraska!!

    Also, on a serious note. When viewed from a distance the pattern helps very effectively to break up the ship's outline, making it difficult to spot at all.
     
  11. hahnficken

    hahnficken New Member

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    There's never a herd of zebras around when you need them! :wink:
     
  12. corpcasselbury

    corpcasselbury New Member

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    Indeed. It was felt that if such patterns could make shooting more difficult for the U-boat commanders, it was worth trying.
     

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