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Persia and Iraq Force (PAIForce)

Discussion in 'North Africa and the Mediterranean' started by BrianBE, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. BrianBE

    BrianBE New Member

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    Hello.

    I am trying to find out more about PAIForce, more specifically what the was the tasks of the men of the Royal Corps of Signals.

    BUT I am not interested in the books of the commanders but what did the men do.

    I did contact the Royal Signals Museum, but all they could refer me to the official books written by the commanders and they advised that the R. Signals was in a supportive role. I knew that.

    My father served with the Royal Corps of Signals in PAIForce and he mentioned about being in small units up in the mountains and his unit had a dog as a runner. Have photos of him with his comrades and their dog. Unfortunately my Dad has passed away so I cannot question him.

    Has anybody any information what these R. Sigs units did.

    Regards

    Brian
     
  2. 4jonboy

    4jonboy New Member

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  3. Drew5233

    Drew5233 Member

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    What Unit was he in? If you don't know I would apply for a copy of his service records as suggested by Lesley. Once you know the units he was with you can look at his units war diaries at the National Archives.

    I would recommend a visit to the museum - Whilst its a bit out of the way, its pretty good and they have a dam fine collection of Royal Signals medals - Mine will be going there when I leave this life ;)

    Good luck from a Ex Scalie
     
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  4. Tim Kestin

    Tim Kestin New Member

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    Hello Brian,
    My dad was also in PAIForce in about 1943 to 45. He was a captain and he had a group of
    Indians under him. It was their job to patrol the telegraph lines because the tribesmen
    used to nick the copper, which fetch a good price apparently. He had to learn basic Urdu
    to communicate with his soldiers. There was no suntan cream in those days (and precious little
    shade out in the desert) and in old age he developed melanomas on his face, which needed
    surgery initially, followed by laser treatment (on the NHS happily).
    Hope this is of interest.
    Tim Kestin
     
  5. Mericia

    Mericia New Member

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    This is interesting as I have begun belatedly to write about my father, long gone to God. An Indian, he served in the 17th Battalion of the 10th Baluch from 1943 until 1946. He was in signals, and in protection duties - first the oil supplies and telegraph lines, and much later protecting Viscount Lord Gort in Palestine-Transjordan. Service took him to Persia, Iraq, Syria, Palestine-Transjordan, Egypt-Libya, and finally Rhodes. I never asked him in what order, or for dates, and only recall the sights he described, the stories he told. Now It is very difficult to be absolutely sure of dates or sequence, but I think I have the order I've mentioned correctly. In Alexandria, he was one of a select few being trained as commandos for the liberation of Rhodes, but the Germans in Rhodes surrendered before this training was complete. This message from Tim Kestin confirms what my father used to tell us. I wish I could find out more.... The whole sequence of the short time my father was in military service took in so many experiences, all so fascinating. Alas, a fire in December 1947 destroyed every possession of his at home save the clothing he wore and the squash racquet he held.
     

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  6. Susan Kovbasyuk

    Susan Kovbasyuk New Member

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    I found an article recently, old and typed entitled PAIForce, our unknown arym by Norman Collins. I don't know who he is or if it was every published but wanted to share it somehow with people interested in the subect. It details the every day life of soldiers in the PAIFORCE and it's an amazing read. as anyone got any ideas where best to share it?
     
  7. Janice Kettle

    Janice Kettle New Member

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    That’s sounds very interesting. I’d like to know if you manage to get that into the public arena.

    My Dad was one of the first army commandos, so far I’ve worked out he was with 3 and them posted to 4.
    Picking apart his record is not easy but it does state,embarked PAIForce 15/1/43 disembarked 1/4/43 then moved to ME & SOS of PAIForce
    It was never something that he would talk about and sadly he died many years ago,in the last few days before he left to did relay some notes of where he had been in the war,they included amongst others, Cape Town,Bombay,Basra,Iraq,Iran,Egypt,Lebanon,Western Dersert and Central Mediterranean Forces.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2018
  8. Sally ross

    Sally ross New Member

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    Hello Brian
    My Dad was also in the Royal signals PAIFORCE, MEF, BNAF, they had a dog called Cubby with them I am also trying to collect more info I have his war records but what medals and campaign stars were they due
    Sally
     
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