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PFC John Jukas 117th Inf Reg 30 Inf Div Old Hickory

Discussion in 'Military Service Records & Genealogical Research' started by Cas, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. Cas

    Cas Member

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    Perhaps I can mail the library for additonal information on the 1929 mining accident, perhaps Jukas' mother pops up in this information.
     
  2. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    You've made quite a bit of progress. I was wondering why only John's (Edward's) mother was listed. The death of John, Sr. in a mining accident makes sense now. I hope the librarian can be of help. Be sure to let us know what you hear,
     
  3. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    I just noticed a slight discrepancy. The mining accident was 22 Jan 1929 and indicates 3 children. According to 1940 census (see post #9 by Lou), there would have been 4 children in 1929. It could be the mining report was not up to date and did not include Raymond Jukas who would have been a relatively recent addition to the family.
     
  4. ckoz

    ckoz New Member

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    Hi there!,

    I found this forum by accident when searching up some of my relatives. It turns out John Jukas was my late great uncle. I was really excited to see all the attention around him here. I have some information to add. My father is Ronald John and was named after his uncle in 1950, my father's mother, Bernadene Jukas Kozla was the oldest sister of John. Apparently, my father resembled his uncle and would always hear about him whilst growing up. Unfortunately for John Jukas, he did not have any children. He was one of the many children by Frances and John Jukas. Not too sure on the details, but I do know that my father's grandfather (John's dad), did pass away while the children were somewhat young. Some of the siblings are actually still around (Jean, Raymond, Lenny, and maybe I am missing someone). Unfortunately both of my father's parents passed before I was born so I greatly appreciate the information I found on this thread. Myself nor my father knew about where he passed (just that it was during the war) nor did we know about any medals or anything.

    Again, it was really interesting to see interest among one of my lost relatives. Thank you!

    Sincerely,
    Caitlin
     
  5. Cas

    Cas Member

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    Dear Caitlin,

    The grave of your great uncle is located at the Henri Chapelle Cemetary in Belgium, I have adopted the grave of your great uncle and reguarly visit it to keep the remembrace of his sacrifice alive. I've sent you a private message containing my email adress, in the hope we can exchange some information and photo's.

    Sincearly

    Cas
     
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  6. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    This is just great. The connections never cease to amaze me. I hope both of you will continue to keep us updated on the progress each of you makes.
     
  7. Cas

    Cas Member

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    40 weeks later I have received the IDPF, and John E Jukas was part of E-Company at least that is what is mentioned in the IDPF. I also received the death certificate for his father. Apparently his parents were immigrants out of Russia.

    The contact with Caitlin has prooved to be a death end, since I haven't received a reply to my e-mails.

    So let's see if anything else comes up, still have hope
     
  8. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Well, E Company would confirm KB's guess that he would be in 2nd Battalion. The death certificate would indicate that John had listed his father as his "next of kin". It seems to me that the next step would be to see if you can find any info on E Company, 117th Infantry.
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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  10. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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  11. Cas

    Cas Member

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    Ladies & Gentlemen,

    We established contact with the family ! With a daughter of Juaks' youngest sister.
     
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  12. Cas

    Cas Member

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    KodiakBeer, Jukas' place of death is listed as the village of Recht in hte IDPF, but I'm wondering about the following. The part of Maastrich I live in was liberated by 117th "E"Co., by a unit under the command of Captain Harold F. Hoppe. I mailed with someone on this forum about it but have lost the mail since my laptop crashed on me this summer. Perhaps Jukas' was part of this platoon ?
     
  13. Cas

    Cas Member

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  14. Natman

    Natman Member

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    Good to hear you've been able to contact a niece of PFC Jukas. Thanks for the update!
     
  15. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    That is good news, Cas. Please continue to keep us informed.
     
  16. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    That is truly good news. Let us know what she has to say. I'm glad you are persistent.
     
  17. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    Recht and Rodt are perhaps a kilometer from each other, so I would guess he died in the approach to Rodt. Recht - Rodt - St. Vith moving in a SE direction.
     
  18. Joel Jukus

    Joel Jukus New Member

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    John Jukas was actually John Jukus but spelt wrong by the military and the 1940 census. In the 1930 census, it is spelt Gukas. Census workers were temporary workers and everything was handwritten. If you look at the original images of the documents, it's sloppy cursive. Anyway, our last name gets spelt wrong all the time.

    John's parents were lithuanian but met in America. The bronze star, purple heart, and flag that was draped on the coffin are in the possession of his brother Leonard Jukus, who now lives in Florida. Everything is spelt as John Jukas. Sadly, one of his other brothers, Raymond, passed away this year. Norman, another one of his brothers still lives in Florida.

    John is my great uncle. I am the grandson of Leonard.

    Sincerely,

    Joel Jukus
     
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  19. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    Welcome to the forum, Joel!

    To give you some perspective on the weeks leading up to January 22nd, the 30th Division (including 117th IR) was in a (somewhat) static position north, dug in across the German border trading artillery, patrols and sporadic fire with German forces also dug in just east of them. When the Germans broke in to the south, in the Ardennes, the 30th (which was a highly regarded and experienced fighting division) was trucked south overnight on the night of 16/17th of December to try and plug the hole created by the German 6th Panzer Army, headed by the infamous 1st Waffen SS Panzer Division, and this they managed to do (along with assorted forces which joined them). There was an incredibly bloody battle along the Ambleve river which thwarted the German spearpoint which was trying to get to the flat country along the Meuse, then on to Antwerp which would have been a disaster for the allies.

    The bad terrain and weather in the Ardennes (deep snow, narrow valleys, narrow roads and river crossings) allowed the thin mix of American forces to put up a much better fight than the German plans had counted on, which delayed their advance by several days, and that flatter terrain to the north and west of the penetration allowed the allies to move countering forces much faster than the Germans slugging their way through the hills. At any rate, by the time the Germans had slugged their way through that thinly defended hill country, they now faced a new wall of fresh American divisions, still blocking their way to the Meuse.

    The 117th was in place in and around Stavelot, the main bridge across the Ambleve river, while 119th and 120th IRs were flanking that center as far east (or NE) as Malmedy, and west along the Ambleve. In the next day or so, collections of miscellaneous armor were thrown together as Task Forces which began hitting the Germans everywhere they had penetrated north of the Ambleve and in country they tried to bypass in the east toward Malmedy.

    That was the end of the battle for the 6th Panzer Army, though the other wing (the 5th Panzer Army) continued to try and break through to the south (Bastogne).

    When the German advance was completely broken, the American army was left with the task of pushing the Germans back to the lines they had held prior to the attack. For the 30th Division this was remembered as the most miserable period of the war. Their task was to advance as far as Saint Vith. For some reason, they had never been issued winter clothing and yet they had to advance through many miles of deep snow, and each good piece of defensive terrain, each little village of stone houses, each overlooking hill, was defended by a German rear guard with a few mortars, a 75, a 20mm gun, flanked with a platoon or company soldiers. It was miserable fighting. Men lost hands and feet to frostbite. Men died of hypothermia each night. Few dead comrades were carried back to the Battalion, their bodies bodies just marked in the snow with an upright rifle with a helmet on top. Recht and Rodt were just milestones in that push. Even the date maybe incorrect - January 22nd might just be the date he was recovered by the graves registration people.
     
  20. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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