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  1. green slime

    green slime Member

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    Rich German family firm reveals Nazi slave past

    'The family will donate €10m (£8.6m) "to a suitable organisation", he said.'

    In other words, approximately 0.03% or 0.3 promille of their accumulated wealth.

    I would like to point out that on occasion I have paid proportionally more in speeding fines...
     
    George Patton likes this.
  2. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Sounds like a lot of money until you put it in perspective like that. On the other hand it sounds like this came to light because the family held the light. It would be interesting to know what percentage of their liquid assets that is.
     
  3. wm.

    wm. Well-Known Member

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    During the ww2 the USSR employed millions of slave workers too, including Poles, Ukrainians, and people from the Baltic States and the conditions were much worse there.
    Germany was a paradise in comparison - not always Ukrainians/Belarussians were initially treated like cattle, and many died as result, this later improved, the bombings weren't fun either.

    In Germany, slave workers were paid (less than the Germans) and had access to health care. Hundreds of thousands actually volunteered (in the first year, mostly because it was much worse in their home countries). The volunteers had more rights than the others, including the right to choose the place of work.

    Germany employed lots of guest workers since the beginning of the 20th century, from Italy, Czechia, Poland (about 250,000 every year), and others. The conditions were usually bad (especially in agriculture), physical violence was common, rapes too.
    But really it was like that in entire Eastern Europe, Germany wasn't any exception.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
    ColHessler likes this.

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