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Russian WW2 interesting stats and facts

Discussion in 'Eastern Europe October 1939 to February 1943' started by Kai-Petri, Dec 16, 2002.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Although much has been made of the damage caused by Stuka attacks, it was in fact the German artillery that had the most devastating effect on the Polish infantry during the fighting. The effect was even greater at corps and army level, with the Wehrmacht having advantages in both the number and quality of heavy-calibre weapons.
    Poland 1939 by Steven J Zaloga
     
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  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Aksel Berg - Wikipedia

    Aksel Ivanovich Berg (Russian: Аксель Иванович Берг; 10 November [O.S. 29 October] 1893 – 9 July 1979) was a Soviet scientist in radio-frequency engineering and Soviet Navy Admiral, Hero of Socialist Labour. He was a key figure in the introduction of cybernetics to the Soviet Union.

    During Stalin's purges, Berg was imprisoned for three years, but was freed and rehabilitated in 1940, when Stalin became interested in developing radar. Berg was immediately appointed as minister of electronic technology of the USSR. He developed the Redut-K air-warning radar which was placed aboard the light cruiser Molotov in April 1941.[2] Molotov´s device enabled her to play a key role in the air defense of Sevastopol in the first stages of Operation Barbarossa.

    Rockets and People: Creating a rocket industry

    It should be noted that as early as August 1943, Berg, among other things, was entrusted with the duties of the head of the “radar institute” designated in the decree “On radar”. However, the institution existed only on paper - it had neither state nor its own premises. In September, the institution being organized was given the name “All-Union Scientific Research Institute No. 108” (today - Berg Center for Scientific and Technical Information). Thanks to Axel Ivanovich, who was actively involved in the selection of specialists, by the end of 1944, the composition of the institute’s engineering and scientific personnel exceeded 250 people. By this time, eleven laboratories were established at the Research Institute №108. Berg worked as a director of the institute until 1957 (with a break from the end of 1943 to 1947). Under his leadership, in the "one hundred and eighth" work began in the field of anti-radiation and electronic warfare. Subsequently, this not only brought fame to the institute, but also had significant technical and political results - in particular, the suppression of American AWACS radar reconnaissance systems was ensured, and Smalt interference stations had an impact on the results of the six-day war in the Middle East. Berg himself - as a specialist - was well versed in various areas of radio electronics (radio communications, radar, radio direction finding, radio electronic warfare), and only television devices did not pass directly through his hands, here he acted only as an organizer of work in the one hundred eighth laboratories of television systems.

    Outstanding Radio Engineer Axel Ivanovich Berg
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Erich Marcks (6 June 1891 – 12 June 1944) was a German general in the Wehrmacht during World War II. He authored the first draft of the operational plan, Operation Draft East, for Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union, advocating what was later known as A-A line as the goal for the Wehrmacht to achieve, within nine to seventeen weeks.

    Erich Marcks - Wikipedia

    As Chief of Staff VIII Corps, Marcks took part in the attack on Poland and was promoted to Chief of Staff 18th Army, serving with it during the Battle of France. In the summer of 1940, Franz Halder, chief of OKH General Staff, directed Marcks to draft an initial operational plan for the invasion of the Soviet Union. Marcks produced a report entitled "Operation Draft East". Citing the need to "protect Germany against enemy bombers", the report advocated the A-A line as the operational objective of the invasion of "Russia" (sic). This goal was a line from Arkhangelsk on the Arctic Sea through Gorky and Rostov to the port city of Astrakhan at the mouth of the Volga on the Caspian Sea. Marcks envisioned that the campaign, including the capture of Moscow and beyond, would require between nine and seventeen weeks to complete.

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Rudolf Brasche and Knight´s cross

    During September 1942 Brasche and his squad were positioned on Hill 489, located 20 km south of Mosdok. The Russians attacked this hill on the 13.09.1942. On the evening of the 14.09.1942 two Soviet battalions stormed against the 7 men of Brasche’s squad. The defending Obergefreiter and his men held their position all alone for 3 days and nights, repelling 14 attacks in the process and all while maintaining control of the 13. Panzer-Division’s cornerstone. Brasche would later be awarded the Knight’s Cross in recognition of his actions here.

    Brasche, Rudolf "Rudi" - TracesOfWar.com
     
  5. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Seven against two battalions? That's movie stuff. Amazing.
     
  6. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The quartermaster´s war diary for Panzer Group I categorized the supply situation on 20 August 1941 as critical. Notwithstanding the dramatic drop in transportation, the panzer group was nevertheless expected to supply nine motorized infantry and panzer divisions, the XXXXIV Army cotps, the newly arrived Italian Expeditionary Corps and the Hungrarian Mobile corps. The distance between the panzer group´s nearest railhead and the front line extended some 350 kilometers, forcing the understated conclusion: Under these circumstances the quartermaster can no longer guarantee a smooth supply.
    Kiev 1941
    David Stahel
     

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