Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Saw Dust In Bread?

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Poppy, Dec 31, 2012.

  1. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,587
    Likes Received:
    759
    ..4th Wilts comment in pet foods tickled a memory regarding sawdust in bread...Can't remember, but it was recent...Is it still possible we are buying bread with saw dust incorporated?..Had heard of folk using saw dust back in WW2, but they were starving and trying to feed a lot of hungry people...Think some producers may use SD as a filler in order to reduce cost?..Create more diet fiber? jedcstuff: Adding sawdust as a source of food fiber The Old Foodie: Sawdust Bread.
     
  2. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    115
    Well I did put in a comment that I had read the listed ingredients on a loaf I once bought of whole wheat bread and found saw dust listed....however in time this has been changed so that now they present the listing with modern terminology calling the same as cellulose fibers which is a more accepted terminology. It is all in how you say it in our modern days isn't it? Saw dust reduces the cost of production so why buy such a large quantity of wheat when a little sawdust will appear the same giving that favored coarseness to the texture.....now we can break wood together so to speak.......
     
  3. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,587
    Likes Received:
    759
    Ha!..VG...HNY.
     
  4. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    12,312
    Likes Received:
    1,232
    Location:
    Michigan
    I remember buy some "high fiber" bread a couple of decades ago. Took a taste then read the label. High on the ingrediant list was "wood cellulose".
     
  5. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,683
    Likes Received:
    953
    No just in our sausages...MMMM.....lovely...don't ask me what me old mum used to put in Birds Eye fish fingers when she worked nightshift in the factory...She never ate a sausage in her life after working there. But never mind sawdust...Pumpernickle or whatever bread....eugh...surely there is mud involved there somewhere
     
  6. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2006
    Messages:
    24,985
    Likes Received:
    2,382
    Knock on wood there is none in my mill :D
     
  7. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    12,312
    Likes Received:
    1,232
    Location:
    Michigan
    I was watching a TV show a number of years ago and it mentioned that our FDA strictly limits the most nutricious ingrediant in flour ... insect parts.
     
  8. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,683
    Likes Received:
    953
    I'd be worried about what parts....blimey....stick to Mcdonalds yanks...
     
  9. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    12,312
    Likes Received:
    1,232
    Location:
    Michigan
    After they've been through the mill it's kind of hard to tell or even spot the difference between them and the grain. I forget how they test for this but in general you can probably count on the whole insect being in there somewhere.

    Of course this raises the question of what do other countries do in this regard?
     
  10. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,683
    Likes Received:
    953
    We used to put em in our Smartie sweet packets...Forget which colour they were...
     
  11. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    1,501
    Since the housing downturn here in the US, the cost of sawdust and wood pulp in general has sky-rocketed, a commodity that sawmills either burned or gave away in the past was at $50 a ton in 2009 and nearly doubled since then. And since so many new uses for “powdered cellulose” has been found it keeps going up. Here is a short ending to an article from May of 2011.

    It cannot hurt you, helps in bulk for better lower tract action, and should NOT be laughed at or scoffed as an additive to your food, like it or not. You want pure bread, bake it yourself with unbleached flour. It is in cheeses, ice cream, and other "goodies" where you wouldn't expect the stuff to be.

    "Powdered cellulose is made by cooking raw plant fiber—usually wood—in various chemicals to separate the cellulose, and then purified. Modified versions go through extra processing, such as exposing them to acid to further break down the fiber.

    "Although the notion of eating fine grains of wood pulp might make some consumers blanch, nutritionists say cellulose—which gives plants their structure—is a harmless fiber that can often cut calories in food. Insoluble dietary fibers like cellulose aren't digestible by humans so add bulk to food without making it more fattening.

    "In the U.S., cutting calories from food doesn't cause a problem because the country is in the grip of an obesity epidemic, says Joanne Slavin, professor of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota. She served as chairwoman the carbohydrate committee of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

    "Cellulose can serve as a good source of dietary fiber for people who don't eat enough fruits, vegetables or whole grains, Ms. Slavin says. The USDA's most recent dietary guidelines recommend young women get 28 grams a day of fiber and young men consume 38 grams.

    'Cellulose is cellulose,' regardless of if whether it comes from wood pulp or celery, says Michael Jacobson, executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a group that advocates healthier, more nutritious food. He says no research points to health problems related to consuming cellulose...."


    Goto:

    Yelling Stop: Sawdust and Ice Cream
     
  12. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,809
    Likes Received:
    2,293
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Leave it to Clint to find items of general interest. Who knew? Cellulose is in nearly everything.
     
  13. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    12,312
    Likes Received:
    1,232
    Location:
    Michigan
    That may be true to a point but the loaf I mentioned tasted like sawdust. I suspect it went through far less processing than is currently the case though. One also wonders what other chemicals were in the sawdust in question. Some trees (such as the yew) are toxic and many others may provoke allergic reactions. No research may point to health problems but how much research has been done? That said obesity is likely a greater danger to most of us myself included.
     
  14. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,683
    Likes Received:
    953
    Its in the wife....shhhh though....
     
  15. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,809
    Likes Received:
    2,293
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I'll try to keep that quiet...after I finish laughing.
     
  16. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    115
    Just commenting.......by your descriptions, cellulose must be "processed"..........making sawdust a more natural ingredient. It also looks like the particles from the covering of the wheat seed if you use cheap woods........however I could see things becoming a bit more complicated if we start using hardwoods for those higher echelon eaters. This then will lead to another division of stereotypical eaters....those of the tree huggers and muggers and those of the wheat bellys that Poppy has already began a thread about if I remember correctly. We are what we eat. I don't know what to think of you guys that eat the nutritious bugs....are you buggers? It is getting quite difficult to keep up the proper stereotyping based on foods and baked breads and other items found in the food source. It makes me remember back to my mom whom I once accused of serving me a bowl of cereal that I thought I had discovered a very short rodent hair in and then after a lot of checking..........my mother concluded I would have to shave my mustache before accepting a breakfast from her again. Was I a mustacher? She definitely thought so.
     
  17. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,587
    Likes Received:
    759
    Oh man....Brilliant:Its in the wife....shhhh though....
     
  18. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,292
    Likes Received:
    115
    From bread.......to bitter truths of cruel observations....thread was hi jinxed and jacked....I am too polite to notice the wooden dimples of others....
     
  19. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,683
    Likes Received:
    953
    We are what we eat as they say....Poppy eats his greens...I eat humble pie.
     

Share This Page