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Sidearms During WII

Discussion in 'Small Arms and Edged Weapons' started by arcadiaredneck, Jul 14, 2008.

  1. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    That is some good shooting.
     
  2. mikebatzel

    mikebatzel Dreadnaught

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    So which one of the Koreans took two?:D
     
  3. Devilsadvocate

    Devilsadvocate Ace

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    I handload both the .45 ACP and 9 MM. The flatter trajectory of the 9 MM is completely inconsequential at any conceivable pistol range. I know of no knowledgeable pistol shooters who consider a flat trajectory or bullet drop to be a factor in pistol accuracy. In fact, I find the best loads in either caliber to be those slightly under the maximum velocity.

    My favorite hand load for the 9 MM Parabellum cartridge is 6.8 grains of AA #5 behind a Speer 115 gr. JHP with a CCI 500 primer. I favor Remington or PMC brass. What's yours?
     
  4. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    The one with two heads :)
     
  5. german mauser k98k man

    german mauser k98k man Member

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    reminginton, but i favor military brass
     
  6. mac_bolan00

    mac_bolan00 Member

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    as i understand it, the m-1/2 carbine was issued to non-frontline troops like artillery men, motorized units, officers, some paratroops. it was basically a personal defense weapon.

    a pistol if most useless if you're not trained well with it. and that probably holds true for most regular soldiers (there's another statement that'll get my a$$ chewed.) specwar is something comepletely different. some SEAL units are still issued modified 1911s to this day. that's from a SEAL in another forum.
     
  7. Devilsadvocate

    Devilsadvocate Ace

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    Yes, it's cheaper, LOL!

    But I was also wondering what primer, bullet, and powder you used, and how much. Almost every handloader I know has a favorite load they've developed for a given caliber, and I was wondering what yours was?
     
  8. Devilsadvocate

    Devilsadvocate Ace

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    That may be true, but an awful lot of M-! Carbines ended up in front-line service. For example, in the fight for Okinawa, 9,267,923 rounds of .30 caliber Rifle (.30-'06) ammo, and 1,462,180 rounds of .45 ACP submachine gun ammo were expended. During the same period on Okinawa 2,009,597 rounds of carbine ammo were expended, indicating that a healthy number of M-1 carbines were in use in active combat zones on Okinawa.

    See;Appendix C


    Yes and no. it's true that many SEAL units choose a modified 1911A1 when they could have any pistol they want; other elite units which have the privilege of choosing their sidearms also select the 1911A1, either modified or mil-spec. It's also been reported that some non-special forces units have been receiving 1911A1's in lieu of the M92 Berretta. Some female members of Army and Air Force MP units were issued with rebuilt Colt 1911A1's when it was found that the grips of the M92 were too large for their hands.
     

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