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sinking of the S-220 by the Fregatte Seymour

Discussion in 'Submarines and ASW Technology' started by Erich, Apr 12, 2010.

  1. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    rough translation from the German to the English. First person account by one of the S-220's shipmen.

    enjoy all

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  2. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    here is the Adversary of the S-220. HMS Seymour

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  3. Spaniard

    Spaniard New Member

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    Rough Translation you got that right. I found this on the same link you posted but on page 65.

    In February 1945 eleven E-boats, mainly from the well-respected 4th Schnellboot Flotille left Ostend for their nightly scrap and, of course our lot were at sea ready to oblige (but never in those numbers). During the ensuring battle, about six of the enemy chased us - or were being lured (depends on which side tells it) towards our coast and ran slap into the arms of HMS Seymour, Waiting as planned and anxious to off-load some of its ammunition, which was a mite heavier than ours.
    In the melee one E-boat (No. S220) was sunk; others were damaged and driven back home. HMS Seymour and some of us then returned to pick up survivors.

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  4. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    correct Spainard. the 4th S-Flottille was quite active in the channel with several other S-Flottilles the end result was mining activities with two different types of sea mines, torpedoing any type of Allied ship was more of a chance or good luck than earlier in the war. Allied intel services and with excellent radar knew when the S-Boots would leave port and could set up the ambush approach to any of the KM vessels, besides allowing BC bomber aircraft to pound the still held KM ports to nothingness.
     

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