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Spearing the Zulu myths

Discussion in 'Military History' started by GRW, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Now this could be interesting!
    "IT was the battle in which the most ever Victoria Crosses in British military history were awarded to a regiment in a single conflict.
    The heroic defence of Rorke’s Drift by a Welsh regiment against an onslaught of thousands of Zulu warriors was hailed as a restoration of the British Army’s reputation during the Anglo-Zulu War.
    The romanticism of the battle story, which took place on January 22, 1879, captured the imagination of Hollywood star Stanley Baker, who produced and starred in the 1964 film Zulu, alongside Michael Caine and Jack Hawkins.
    Now considered a classic, the Army’s favourite film is to be the focus of a new exhibition at Cardiff Castle’s Firing Line: Museum of The Welsh Soldier, from February 26."
    Read More Exhibition spears the ‘Zulu’ myths about Rorke’s Drift - Wales News - News - WalesOnline
     
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  2. Hilts

    Hilts Member

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    'Zulu Dawn' isn't bad either..............
     
  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    :cool:It is indeed.
     
  4. Hilts

    Hilts Member

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    There was a documentary on The battlefield at Ishandawala, Battlefield Detectives maybe..............?? Very interesting, found cartridge cases far from where they expected them to be. If I recall, they concluded the soldiers were too far apart and too far forward to produce enough firepower. Plus guns over heating & jamming and slow issue of ammo.

    Well worth watching!
     
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  5. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    I saw that Doc a few years ago. They played it back to back along with one about Custers Last Stand. That was a great series of Docs.
     
  6. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    That was a great doc, Hilts.
    So was the Little Big Horn one.
     
  7. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

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    The two movies were just movies...based on many facts but still movies. i could sit here and pick them to pieces but wont..the verricker bit really gets my goat. read the campaign histories..washing of spears etc..movies about 2 actions miss out the other columns involved and the later battles once relief and reinforcements poured in. Again very interesting stuff but unless you delve into the scheming and politics before and the zulu traditions..well im saying nowt..but ive been to both rourkes drift islandwhanna and other column battle points..love the zulu war history but...errr no matter what we were the bad guys..not that it changes anything or respect from me..but its a fascinating logistical campaign..
     
  8. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    Much like the American west it is sometimes hard to seperate the valor of the troops against the agenda the were employed for.
     
  9. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

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    Ithink youve hit it on the head there. The overall campaign could be looked at in a similar vein to your wild west..even s.africa before and after resembled it..the amount of conflict overall in s.africa was indeed similar...even some pics of the time would have you guessing if you were looking at texans and not locally raised forces and boers etc. spot on old chap.
     

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