Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

T-34 and spare fuel tanks

Discussion in 'Information Requests' started by Kai-Petri, May 3, 2006.

  1. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    6,192
    Likes Received:
    1,794
    Location:
    Perfidious Albion
    For an extreme example of carrying fuel externally (though not on an AFV) have a look at the Fiat Sahariana.
    (eg: http://mailer.fsu.edu/~akirk/tanks/Italy/Ita-AS42-1.JPG )
    Now that really does look dangerous, that isn't a field mod, they were built like that. I suppose it illustrates the importance of fuel supply over tactical considerations as suggested above.
     
  2. Fortune

    Fortune Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2005
    Messages:
    634
    Likes Received:
    0
    jesus christ! i would hate to take a shell driving that sucker.... thered be nothing left to send home...
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    22,650
    Likes Received:
    1,098
    Location:
    Kotka,Finland
    Does remind me of an old Doors song...

    :eek:
     
  4. skunk works

    skunk works Ace

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    2,156
    Likes Received:
    104
    Kai is correct as well.
    You can find many picks (especially DAK)(and some OST front) carrying fuel cans on the back deck (altered to carry more)(angle iron/steel mesh).
    Many of my models duplicate pic's I've seen.
    The prospect of running out and stopping was worse than the odds of being hit there before you could stash it somewhere else (before enguaging the enemy). Being a welder myself...I love angle iron, you can make anything out of it!
    The "Jerry" cans with the white cross on them were water, the plain ones were indeed gasolene.
    The T-34s I spoke of were Model 1943 (Cs?)with those "squarish" cans on (and above) the rear (both sides) of the tank. A hit from behind (with HE) would splash/vaporize any fuel within these containers.
    A problem not often encountered, unless exposed from behind, a "sucker punch" if you will.
    Future models of the 34 and subsequent TD's had the cans on the side.
    I assume to avoid the destructive effects of them being hit from the rear. Live and learn. The rear tanks were discontinued because of harsh lessons...Once again...I assume.
    Which song Kai? The End?

    [ 09. May 2006, 07:12 PM: Message edited by: skunk works ]
     
  5. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    6,192
    Likes Received:
    1,794
    Location:
    Perfidious Albion
    Come on baby light my Sahariana?
     
  6. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    22,650
    Likes Received:
    1,098
    Location:
    Kotka,Finland
    Yes, that´s the one. "Light my fire!"

    BTW,

    Most of the lyrics were written by Doors guitarist Robbie Krieger. He wanted to write about one of the elements: fire, air, earth, and water. Jim Morrison wrote some of the second verse, and Ray Manzarek came up with the organ intro.

    http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=220
     
  7. TA152

    TA152 Ace

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2002
    Messages:
    3,423
    Likes Received:
    120
    I did not know that KP ! I had always thought Jim wrote the lyrics since he wrote a book of poetry and put some of it to music.

    "The Lords and The New Creatures".

    His father was a captain of an aircraft carrier during the Viet Nam war.

    The appeal of cinema lies in the fear of death.

    Film confers a kind of spurious eternity.

    Two lines from the book that I got for $1.95
    :eek:
     
  8. Nikita Kruschev

    Nikita Kruschev Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very interesting point. One would assume that the Russians, or anyone else for that matter, would have taken into consideration the risk of having more diesel fuel exposed on the side, however as others have stated it is much less easy to spark.
     
  9. bigiceman

    bigiceman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    3
    First you have to get the tank to the battle, then you worry about what could be struck. I think that the use of the multiple fuel tanks even some on the outside proved to work for the Soviets. They continued to use the idea into the cold war and beyond.
     
  10. skunk works

    skunk works Ace

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    2,156
    Likes Received:
    104
    You are correct Iceman.
    I can't think of anything (almost) more important than range, in a war that is. If you're outmatched, at least you can still run.
    Your success depends on it.
    Be that a B-29, P-51, a fast carrier group, or a tank army. Long range made the difference.
    Running out of fuel is bad news, the words "Sitting Duck" (for a tank) come to mind, or "falling out of the sky" (for a plane), and "bobbing like a cork" on the ocean (for a ship).
    Beans(food/water), Bullets(ammunition), Benzene(fuel).
    Forget even one...you lose.
    I'd have extra gas on my tanks (the ones back aways, not the point).
     

Share This Page