Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

The Food of WWII

Discussion in 'WWII Activities and Hobbies' started by Jack B, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,322
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    The article also refers to restaurants baking “Dampers”. A damper is an Australian specialty. It’s essentially a soda bread, a bit like Scottish ‘Bannock’. I believe the name refers to the bread’s ability to ‘dampen’ the appetite.


    I wasn't expecting damper to be in this!
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    This is the bomb...like a giant scone (pronounced Skon, not Skone)
    Remember Waltzing Matilda is about a "swagman"
    Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong, under the shade of a coolabah tree...

    Billabong
    [​IMG]
    Coolabah tree
    [​IMG]
     
    Jack B likes this.
  2. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Well-Known Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2018
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Jack, Love the look. Modern Rustic is a great description and you have great color with your crust. Another great use of old apples that you would have not wanted to waste during the war and your crust is 3 ingredients. I bet it taste as good as it looks.
     
  3. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Well-Known Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2018
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Would you serve with jams or? I know when my grandmother made Irish soda bread, we use to get it served with this dark jam which I think had more whiskey in it than anything else. Thanks for the great shots and also for some great information
     
    CAC likes this.
  4. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2019
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    212
    Location:
    Deep in the armchair
    Thanks, jba!
     
  5. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,322
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    You can use it to mop up a stew or probably more commonly slathered with butter/margarine (they can be dry like a scone) and then covered with jam or even treacle...Cut a piece like a wedge of cake and off you go! You can add raisins or other dry fruit to it if its going to be eaten as a dessert.
     
  6. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2019
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    212
    Location:
    Deep in the armchair
    I've read that small dampers with added raisins, currants, fats, or sugar might be called "Brownies", "Tommies", or "Fatties". I could see making a fine breakfast out of a "fatty" and a mug of tea.
     
  7. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,322
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    Never heard of those...or a small damper....
    Cooking pot sized almost always...
    [​IMG]
    Aboriginals love damper too
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Jba45ww2 likes this.
  8. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,394
    Likes Received:
    715
    the piece de resistance
    would be the little flag.
    nice.
     
    CAC likes this.
  9. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2020
    Messages:
    476
    Likes Received:
    197
    Boy after reading all of these recipes and checking out the photos..I think I have gained ten pounds...interesting thread.
     
  10. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6,698
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    Jack your thread appears to have influence everywhere;

    British bakers reintroduce World War II bread in coronavirus fight

    GLASGOW — As British politicians invoke memories of World War II’s “Blitz Spirit” during the coronavirus lockdown, and many are quietly channeling the stoic resolve their elders showed in the face of enormous hardship, some in the nation’s baking community are taking a more direct cue from history.

    Britain's National Loaf — a nutrient-dense whole wheat bread first produced in 1942 — has been re-emerging in recent weeks.

    victory bread.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2020
    Jba45ww2 likes this.
  11. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2019
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    212
    Location:
    Deep in the armchair
  12. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    11,355
    Likes Received:
    1,881
    Biak: Crumbled bacon would be far better.
     
  13. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6,698
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    Hiya Larry! Bacon crumbled or anyway would be better :p
     
  14. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Well-Known Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2018
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    New Jersey
    I also saw on the news yesterday that the purchase of Instant Yeast has risen (No Pun intended) like 600% since the virus and lockdown has begun. Now I am not sure that everyone is exactly sure what to do with it since I think bread making is something that most people have forgotten how to do. Below is an "action" shot of my loaves in the oven on a stone from my Easter dinner. I hope everyone stayed safe and enjoyed a great meal with their family

    Bread 1.jpg
     
    Biak, Jack B and CAC like this.
  15. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6,698
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    I also saw articles saying Sourdough bread is making a significant comeback.


    I would have said, "is on the rise", but that would have been way too easy :D
     
    Jba45ww2 likes this.
  16. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2019
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    212
    Location:
    Deep in the armchair
    It's just one advantage of sourdough. I have a jar of instant yeast on my shelf. Haven't touched it for several years now.

    I've got a small loaf of sourdough 'proofing' today. Will bake it later on...if all goes well. :fingerscrossed:
     
    Biak likes this.
  17. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    6,698
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    I found an article that showed substituting maple syrup, as it was cheaper, for sugar during ww2 and not rationed.
    I'm boiling down the last 30 gallons of Maple sap for the season now. it has been a good year for syrup even if the beginning of the year has been a trial of which I wish no one ever needs to endure again.

    We tried our hand at making syrup just to see if we could and each year for some strange reason I add a few more spiles. Tapped 24 trees this year and got 98 gallons before I pulled the plug. 2 1/2 gallons of pure Minnesota Maple syrup is plenty.
     
    Jba45ww2 likes this.
  18. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2019
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    212
    Location:
    Deep in the armchair
    That is fantastic!
     
  19. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Well-Known Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2018
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Can’t wait to see the end product. Sure it will look and taste great. The one thing I wish we could do is be able to share each other’s food. I guess we will have to be satisfied by just looking at pictures
     
  20. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Well-Known Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2018
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Just out of curiosity besides curiosity after it drips from the tree what is the finishing process? Cooking and?
     

Share This Page