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The Foresight War reviews

Discussion in 'The Library' started by Tony Williams, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. Tony Williams

    Tony Williams Member

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    Those of you interested in 'what ifs' concerning WW2 might be interested in my 'alternative WW2' novel, The Foresight War. You can read the first chapter on-line (link from my website) and read reviews HERE

    Tony Williams: Military gun and ammunition website and discussion forum
     
  2. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    Hi Tony. Just finished the second read... Too short! :grin: The entire 2nd World War in a book that size. I enjoyed it, but wanted more.
    A couple of questions if I may: (Spoiler notice. For those that haven't read the book, some of the questions may give part of it away).

    Necked up cartridges for the 14 pr etc: wouldn't necking out a cartridge and fitting a larger shot/ shell have a reduced muzzle velocity? Similar amount of propellant but heavier shell/ shot.
    Hovercraft: surprised me, but once the principle was explained I think it would be fairly easy to build them in WWII - and gives me some nasty ideas for our current campaign set in 1945 at the wargames club.
    Helicopters: I'm a bit less sure about these, since the problems (IIRC) were mostly about control. Would a historian have enough technical knowledge to get helicopters into service that much earlier, or were they included just because you liked the idea?
    What's the next fiction book going to be about? Any hints for your readership?
     
  3. Tony Williams

    Tony Williams Member

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    I'm pleased you liked it!

    Yes, it would: but that's only for the full-calibre (HE) rounds, where velocity doesn't matter in a tank gun, it's the bigger HE content that makes it worth doing. The AP round was APDS, and the calibre of the gun doesn't affect the size and weight of the flight projectile (it just makes the light-alloy sabot a bit wider). In this case, the larger calibre would enable more performance to be extracted from the same amount of propellant.

    Well, in real life the Germans had them in WW2, and so did the USA (see Sikorski R4), so the technical problems were recognised and being addressed. I don't think it would have taken much info from Erlang about the usefulness of modern helos to prompt a much bigger development effort.
    Not about military stuff, I'm afraid - a kind of present-day SF!

    Tony Williams: Military gun and ammunition website and discussion forum
     
  4. Oli

    Oli New Member

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    Thanks for the replies Tony.

    The necking up bothered me slightly, but I see now how it would work.
    Still not 100% sure about helicopters from us Brits (I knew someone who worked with Cierva, who was probably our best-known rotor-craft proponent during WWII) and I know we weren't as close to solving control issues. But it works for the book, which is what counts.

    I look forward to your next fiction book.
     
  5. dave phpbb3

    dave phpbb3 New Member

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    I've had the book 2 days and have finished it.

    Loved it, not technically minded or have enough knowledge to question any of the ammunition or tactical changes but i still enjoyed the book very much.
     

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