Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

This Day In The War, In The Pacific

Discussion in 'War in the Pacific' started by syscom3, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1931
    CHINA: The Japanese send an ultimatum to General Ma Chan-shan, the Governor of Heilongjiang Province, to begin a withdrawal of Chinese troops from Tsitsihar by 15 November and disperse his forces.


    1935
    JAPAN: The Japanese again refused to attend the Nine-Power Conference on the Sino-Japanese dispute at Brussels stating ". . . the Imperial Government adheres firmly to the view that its present action, being one of self-defense force upon Japan by the challenge of China, lies outside the scope of the Nine-Power Treaty, and that there is no room for discussion of the question of its application. It is certainly impossible to accept an invitation to a Conference convened in accordance with the stipulations of that Treaty after Japan has been accused of having violated its terms."

    1940
    UNITED STATES: The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Harold R. Stark, submits memorandum to Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, on four plans if the U.S. enters the war. He favors the fourth one, Plan Dog, calling for a strong offensive in the Atlantic and defense in the Pacific.
    As a result of the British raid on Taranto, the Secretary of the Navy asks the Special Naval Observer in London, Rear Admiral Robert L. Ghormley, to "learn more details of how the attack was carried out, especially as to what extent aerial torpedoes were used." Knox tells Ghormley the successful operation "did not a little to promote an most optimistic attitude hereabouts."


    1941
    UNITED STATES: In California, 15 Japanese-American businessmen and community leaders in Los Angeles Little Tokyo are picked up in an F.B.I. raid. Records and membership lists for such organizations as the Japanese Chamber of Commerce and the Central Japanese Association are seized. The 15 would cooperate with authorities, while a spokesman for the Central Japanese Association states: "We teach the fundamental principles of America and the high ideals of American democracy. We want to live here in peace and harmony. Our people are 100% loyal to America."

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force bombers are on alert at Umnak and Adak Islands to attack any reported naval targets; intermittent fighter patrols fly over Adak Island.

    CHINA: Lieutenant General Josepeh Stilwell, Commander-in- Chief U.S. China-Burma- India (CBI) Theater of Operations, Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek and Commander of the Northern Area Combat Command in Burma, sends a memorandum to Chinese Foreign Minister T.V. Soong suggesting that a commander be chosen at once for the Yunnan Force (Y-Force); that units to participate in the offensive be designated and reorganized; that available 75-mm guns be sent to Yunnan; and that incompetent commanders be removed.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, Gorari falls to the Australian 25th Brigade. The Japanese succeed in withdrawing their main forces across flooded Kumusi River, during the night of 12/13 November. During the Japanese retreat, Lieutenant General HORII Tomitaro, commander of the South Sea Detachment, drowns and 600 soldiers die. Japanese resistance outside their beachheads at Buna and Gona has collapsed. The 2d Battalion of 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, moves toward Gora and Bolu. The 3d Battalion of the 126th, is airlifted from Port Moresby to Pongani and the troops immediately start overland toward Natunga.

    AUSTRALIA: HQ 374th Troop Carrier Group is activated at Brisbane, Australia.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, a Japanese pocket along Gavaga Creek is completely eliminated. The action has cost the Japanese 450 killed, and the few who have eluded the trap are being harassed, while retiring toward Mt Austen, by the 2d Marine Raider Battalion marching west from Aola Bay. The Kokumbona assault force completes withdrawal across the Matanikau River.
    Eleven Japanese transports carrying 13,500 troops and supported by a force of cruisers and two battleships, HIJMS Kirishima and Hiei, leave the Shortland Island area and head for Guadalcanal Island;
    during the afternoon the reconnaissance value and defensive capability of the B-17's are ably demonstrated when a single B-17 sights a carrier 350 nautical miles off Guadalcanal Island and maintains contact for two hours before returning to base with claims of six "Zeke" fighters shot down.
    The Naval Battle of Guadalcanal opens: Six U.S. transports of USN Task Force 67 (Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner) are unloading about 6,000 troops, including Regimental Combat Team 182 of the Army's Americal Division, in Lunga Roads under the protection of air and surface forces. These are reported to Japanese headquarters at Rabaul, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago, by Japanese observers, as three battleships, three heavy cruisers, 11 destroyers and five transports.
    At 1305 hours local, 19 "Betty" bombers, escorted by "Zeke" fighters, make a low-level torpedo attack against the ships. The Japanese aircraft are intercepted by USMC Wildcats and USAAF P-39's and 16 "Betty" bombers and seven "Zeke" fighters are shot down by the fighters and antiaircraft fire. Three transports are damaged and the heavy cruiser USS San Francisco is damaged when hit by a crashing bomber; destroyer USS Buchanan is hit by friendly 5-inch (12,7 centimeter) shell. Twenty four sailors on San Francisco are killed, 45 are wounded and the after fire control radar is destroyed; five men are killed on Buchanan and Their unloading is interupted shortly afternoon by an Japanese Navy air strike.
    U.S. search planes spot the Japanese Bombardment Force consisting of the battleships HIJMS Hiei and Kirishima, the light cruiser HIJMS Nagara and 13 destroyers under Rear Admiral ABE Hiroaki, steaming south at 25 knots. They also spot Destroyer Division 4 and Rear-Admiral Tanaka Raizo's 13 transports trying to catch up with the battleships.
    Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner pulls his transports out in the evening. He leaves Rear-Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan with Rear Admiral Norman Scott and heavy cruisers USS San Francisco and Portland; light cruisers USS Helena, Atlanta and Juneau; and destroyers USS Aaron Ward, Barton, Cushing, Fletcher, Laffey, Monssen, O'Bannon and Sterett, to face the Japanese battleships.
    Admiral Callaghan is in tactical command, due to 15 days seniority over Admiral Scott. Scott had successfully commanded the US forces in their victory at the Battle of Cape Esperance in October.
    The first 12 P-38 Lightnings as well as USMC and USN aircraft, are moved from Tontouta Airfield on Noumea, New Caledonia Islands and Espiritu Santo Island to Henderson Field to bolster the defense of Guadalcanal Island.
    USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s bomb Japanese shipping at Tonolai harbor in southern Bougainville Island.

    UNITED STATES: The Air Corps Board, which had been established before World War II to develop and determine military requirements, is redesignated the Army Air Forces Board.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): HQ 30th BG and it's 38th BS transfer from Hickam Field and Kahuku, Territory of Hawaii respectively to Nanumea in the Ellice with B-24's. The 38th will fly it's first mission on 16 Nov. The air echelon of the 26th Bombardment Squadron, 11th BG (Heavy), based on Nukufetau in the Ellice begins operating from Canton in the Phoenix with B-24's. The squadron will fly it's first mission on 14 Nov. The 819th Bombardment Squadron, 30th BG (Heavy), transfers from Barking Sands to Wheeler Field with B-24's. The 819th supplies the group with replacement crews and aircraft.

    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 2 B-24's mine the Rangoon River during the night of 12/13 Nov.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 10 B-25's and 24 P-40's attack Yoyang, hitting the warehouse area, railroad yards, and AA positions; 5 B-25's bomb the Yangchi Kang waterfront area and attack waterfront targets at Puchi; 6 B-25's and 12 fighters hit targets at Yoyang; 15 P-40's and a B-25 on armed reconnaissance hit several targets of opportunity in the Lungling area and between Yang-Chia-Kang and Sichai.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: The Japanese withdraw the remaining 52 aircraft of their aircraft carrier groups that have been flying off land bases at Rabaul on New Britain Island. Of 173 aircraft that arrived on 20 October, 121 have been lost, most with their pilots.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomons , 18 B-25's bomb Tarlena; 6 others bomb the Matchin Bay area; and 8 P-38's strafe Bonis airfield.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: In the Treasury Islands, the 8th Brigade Group, New Zealand 3d Division, completes the elimination of a small Japanese garrison on Mono Island, the large island north of Stirling Island. For 205 Japanese dead counted, 40 New Zealanders and 12 Americans lost their lives.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-25's and B-26's bomb villages between Finschhafen and Saidor. Following a series of damaging allied strikes, the Japanese remove their carrier aircraft from Rabaul, New Britain, which afterwards ceases to be a serious threat to Allied forces.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s attack targets on Java and on Ceram Islands.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Eight USAAF Fourteenth Air Force B-25s knock out a railway bridge and damage two others near Thanh Hoa. Meanwhile, fighter-bombers hit various targets of opportunity at several other locations scattered throughout northern French Indochina.

    AUSTRALIA: Between 0353 and 0530 hours, Japanese aircraft bomb Parap, Adelaide River and Batchelor Airfield in the Northern Territory. This is the 64th and last bombing attack against northern Australia since February 1942.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-21 torpedoes and sinks the U.S. troopship SS Cape San Juan about 242 nautical miles S of Suva, Viti Levu Island, Fiji Islands, in position 22.08S, 178.06E.
    The ship was en route from San Francisco, California, U.S.A., to Townsville, Queensland, Australia, with 49 crewmen, 41 USN Armed Guards and 1,348 Army troops. Sixteen men are killed when the torpedo hits the ship and a further 114 drown while abandoning ship. The survivors are picked up by a merchant vessel, a USN destroyer and a Pan American Airways flying boat. Attempts are made to tow Cape San Juan to port, but she sinks tomorrow.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 2 B-24s fly armed reconnaissance over Onnekotan and Matsuwa Islands.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 8 B-25s knock out a railway bridge and damage 2 others near Thanh Hoa, French Indochina. In Burma, 4 B-25s bomb the town of Man Pwe while 4 attack Wanling. In China, 38 P-51s and P-40s hit Hengyang Airfield and attack river, rail, and road traffic, artillery pieces, pillboxes, and storage around Hengyang, Lingling, and Kweilin; 13 P-40s hit the Changsha area; 40 P-51s and P-38s hit various targets of opportunity at several other locations scattered throughout S China and N French Indochina; the 21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Fourteenth AF, based at Kunming, sends a flight to operate from Suichwan with F-5s (other flights are operating from Kanchow and Hanchung).

    CHINA: The East China Air Task Force, formed by Major General Claire Chennault, Commanding General USAAF Fourteenth Air Force, to help Chinese troops defend east China airfields from bases west and east of Japanese-held corridor, begins arriving at Suichwan and goes into action within a week.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 16 P-47s support ground forces in the Pinwe area and near Indaw; 24 attack supplies and communications targets in the Kawlin area while 9 bomb Japanese concentrations at Indaw and Man Hkong; the town of Pegon is attacked by 11 P-47s and 20+ others and 9 B-25s hit targets of opportunity during the sweeps of the Irrawaddy River from Singu to Katha and along rail lines at several points in N Burma. 250+ transport sorties are flown to forward bases and frontline areas. HQ 2d Air Commando Group arrives at Kalaikunda, India from the US.

    CEYLON: Allied Land Forces South East Asia (ALFSEA) is activated under British Lieutenant General Sir Oliver Leese. The new headquarters consists of former Headquarters, 11 Army Group, previously under General Sir George Giffard, and some U.S. officers; has control over British troops, the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC), Chinese Army in India (CAI), and Chinese forces within the South East Asia Command (SEAC). American Lieutenant General Raymond A. Wheeler takes over Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell's former post of Deputy Supreme Allied Commander, SEAC.

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS (Twentieth Air Force): The USAAF Twentieth Air Force's XX Bomber Command flies Mission 16: 96 China-based B-29s are dispatched to bomb to bomb Omura, Kyushu Island. While en route, it is learned that there is bad weather at the target due to a typhoon and the aircraft are ordered to hit a target in China. Twenty nine bombers do not get the word and bomb Omura with the loss of five aircraft.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 29 Saipan based B-24s with P-38 escort bomb the airfield on Iwo Jima. 11 P-47s strafe the runway and storage area on Pagan. During the night a B-24 on a snooper mission bombs Iwo Jima. B-24s from Angaur Airfield bomb Koror.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Units moving to Leyte Island, Philippine Islands: HQ 91st Photographic Wing (Reconnaissance) moves from Biak Island; HQ 345th BG (Medium) and the 498th and 499th Bombardment Squadrons (Medium) from Biak Island with B-25s (squadrons continue to operate from Biak Island). The 370th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 307th BG (Heavy), ceases operating from Noemfoor with B-24s and returns to base on Wakde.
    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators and fighter- bombers over northeastern Celebes and Halmahera Islands attack shipping and Djailolo Aerodrome on Halmahera Island. Lost is B-25G 42-65142.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, over 50 USAAF Far East Air Force B-25s blast Mapia and Asia Islands.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte Island, the 21st Infantry Regiment, the 24th Infantry Division gains the crest of Breakneck Ridge shortly after noon but is unable to advance south along Highway 2 from there. The 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, after receiving its first airdrop of supplies, moves through Consuegra to Cabiranan. The 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, blocks Highway 2 south of Limon and maintains the block with difficulty until 23 November.
    USAAF Far East Air Force B-24s bomb Alicante (Escalente) Airfield on northeast Negros Island while on Leyte Island, fighter-bombers hit Linao barges on the west coast and shipping in Ormoc Bay and B-25s bomb Degos (Digos or Daliao or Degosu) and Matina Aerodromes on Mindanao Island.
    Major Thomas B. McGuire, Jr. shoots down two "Jack" fighters over Leyte bringing his total victories to 28.

    1945
     
  2. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 5,419

    1942
    ADMIRALTY ISLANDS: A USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s strafes a schooner in Lorengau harbor on Manus Island, Admiralty Islands.

    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A USAAF Eleventh Air Force aircraft fly reconnaissance over Agattu and Japanese-held Attu Islands reveals five Japanese landing barges in Chichagof harbor on Attu Island.

    NEW GUINEA: Australian troops destroy the Japanese rear guard at the Kumusi River crossing in Papua New Guinea. In the early afternoon, the Australian 2/31st Battalion reaches Waitropi.

    BOUGAINVILLE ISLAND: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17 bombs shipping off Tonolai-Komaleai Point and the airfield at Kahili.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Naval Battle of Guadalcanal continues: USN Task Group 67.4, comprising the heavy cruisers USS San Francisco and Portland; light cruisers USS Helena, Atlanta and Juneau; and destroyers USS Aaron Ward, Barton, Cushing, Fletcher, Laffey, Monssen, O'Bannon and Sterett encounters the Japanese Bombardment Force that includes the battleships HIJMS Hiei and Kirishima, the light cruiser HIJMS Nagara and destroyers HIJMS Akatsuki, Amatsukaze, Asagumo, Harusame, Ikazazuchi, Inazuma, Murasame, Samidare, Shigure, Shiratsuyu, Teruzuki, Yadachi, Yugure and Yukikaze, steaming to bombard Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, shortly after 0000 hours; a savage nocturnal naval action ensues.
    Rear Admiral Abe Hiroaki's force inflicts heavy damage on TG 67.4 before it retires northward; Rear Admirals Callaghan and Norman Scott are killed on board their respective flagships, heavy cruiser USS San Francisco and light cruiser USS Atlanta. Both Callaghan and Scott are awarded Medals of Honor (posthumously).
    On board San Francisco, Lieutenant Commanders Herbert E. Schonland and Bruce McCandless prove instrumental in saving their ship, and Boatswain's Mate First Class Reinhardt J. Keppler performs a succession of heroic acts in fighting fires and removing wounded during the thick of the battle. Those three men (Keppler posthumously) also earn the nation's highest award for bravery.
    USN Task Force 16 (Rear Admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid), formed around the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, the last operational fleet carrier in the Pacific, nears the battle area and launches air search and attacks against the Japanese.
    Light cruiser USS Atlanta, irreparably damaged by Japanese naval gunfire and torpedo as well as by friendly fire from heavy cruiser USS San Francisco, is scuttled by demolition charges 3 nautical miles off Lunga Point; light cruiser USS Juneau, damaged by gunfire, is torpedoed and sunk by Japanese submarine HIJMS I-26 about 121 nautical miles SE of Henderson Field, Guadalcanal Island, in position 10.34S, 161.44E, as Juneau retires toward Espiritu Santo. Loss of life is heavy.
    Also sunk are destroyers USS Cushing and Monssen to gunfire, USS Laffey to gunfire and torpedo, and USS Barton to two torpedoes. Heavy cruiser USS Portland suffers torpedo damage; USS San Francisco, light cruiser USS Helena and destroyer USS Aaron Ward are damaged by gunfire; and friendly fire damages destroyer USS O'Bannon. With the loss of two light cruisers, the USN now has 25 light cruisers in commission.
    The Japanese, however, do not emerge from the brutal nocturnal slugfest unscathed: battleship HIJMS Hiei, damaged by gunfire from heavy cruisers USS Portland and San Francisco and destroyers USS Cushing, Laffey, and O'Bannon, is sunk by TBF Avengers of VT-8 in aircraft carrier USS Enterprise and USMC SBD Dauntlesses of Marine VMSB-142 and TBF Avengers of VMSB-131 from Henderson Field. Destroyer HIJMS Akatsuki is sunk by San Francisco and Atlanta gunfire near Savo Island. Destroyer HIJMS Yudachi, damaged by gunfire, is sunk by heavy cruiser USS Portland southeast of Savo Island. Japanese destroyers HIJMS Murasame, Ikazuchi, and Amatsukaze are damaged by gunfire; destroyer HIJMS Yukikaze is damaged by aircraft, off Guadalcanal. Destroyer HIJMS Michisio is also damaged by aircraft off Shortland Island.
    Eight P-38s of the 339th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group, arrive on Fighter 1 strip just east of Henderson Field after flight from Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea.
    At 0925 hours, a USAAF B-17s sights 12 Japanese transports escorted by ten warships in New Georgia Sound. The force turns back and not sighted again today.
    During the night of 13 November, heavy cruisers HIJMS Suzuya and Maya approach Guadalcanal to shell Henderson Field, intending to render it inoperable the following morning.
    Air strength on Guadalcanal Island is raised by the arrival of three B-26s of the 69th and 70th Bombardment Squadrons, 38th BG (Medium), from New Hebrides Island as the naval battle of Guadalcanal Island continues; Japanese cruisers and destroyers bombard Henderson Field on Guadalcanal during the night of 13/14 November, and destroy one of the new P-38s.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): HQ 30th BG and it's 38th BS transfer from Hickam Field and Kahuku, Territory of Hawaii respectively to Nanumea in the Ellice with B-24's. The 38th will fly it's first mission on 16 Nov. The air echelon of the 26th Bombardment Squadron, 11th BG (Heavy), based on Nukufetau in the Ellice begins operating from Canton in the Phoenix with B-24's. The squadron will fly it's first mission on 14 Nov. The 819th Bombardment Squadron, 30th BG (Heavy), transfers from Barking Sands to Wheeler Field with B-24's. The 819th supplies the group with replacement crews and aircraft.

    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 2 B-24's mine the Rangoon River during the night of 12/13 Nov.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 10 B-25's and 24 P-40's attack Yoyang, hitting the warehouse area, railroad yards, and AA positions; 5 B-25's bomb the Yangchi Kang waterfront area and attack waterfront targets at Puchi; 6 B-25's and 12 fighters hit targets at Yoyang; 15 P-40's and a B-25 on armed reconnaissance hit several targets of opportunity in the Lungling area and between Yang-Chia-Kang and Sichai.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: The Japanese withdraw the remaining 52 aircraft of their aircraft carrier groups that have been flying off land bases at Rabaul on New Britain Island. Of 173 aircraft that arrived on 20 October, 121 have been lost, most with their pilots.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomons , 18 B-25's bomb Tarlena; 6 others bomb the Matchin Bay area; and 8 P-38's strafe Bonis airfield.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: In the Treasury Islands, the 8th Brigade Group, New Zealand 3d Division, completes the elimination of a small Japanese garrison on Mono Island, the large island north of Stirling Island. For 205 Japanese dead counted, 40 New Zealanders and 12 Americans lost their lives.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-25's and B-26's bomb villages between Finschhafen and Saidor. Following a series of damaging allied strikes, the Japanese remove their carrier aircraft from Rabaul, New Britain, which afterwards ceases to be a serious threat to Allied forces.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s attack targets on Java and on Ceram Islands.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Eight USAAF Fourteenth Air Force B-25s knock out a railway bridge and damage two others near Thanh Hoa. Meanwhile, fighter-bombers hit various targets of opportunity at several other locations scattered throughout northern French Indochina.

    AUSTRALIA: Between 0353 and 0530 hours, Japanese aircraft bomb Parap, Adelaide River and Batchelor Airfield in the Northern Territory. This is the 64th and last bombing attack against northern Australia since February 1942.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-21 torpedoes and sinks the U.S. troopship SS Cape San Juan about 242 nautical miles S of Suva, Viti Levu Island, Fiji Islands, in position 22.08S, 178.06E.
    The ship was en route from San Francisco, California, U.S.A., to Townsville, Queensland, Australia, with 49 crewmen, 41 USN Armed Guards and 1,348 Army troops. Sixteen men are killed when the torpedo hits the ship and a further 114 drown while abandoning ship. The survivors are picked up by a merchant vessel, a USN destroyer and a Pan American Airways flying boat. Attempts are made to tow Cape San Juan to port, but she sinks tomorrow.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In Burma, 4 B-25s bomb Man Pwe while 4 others blast 3 warehouses at Wanling. 60+ P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance over S China and as far W and SW as Burma and Thailand hit numerous targets of opportunity including shipping, troops, and railroad targets.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 100+ fighter-bombers pound numerous targets in N Burma; close support strikes are made on the Pinwe area, bridges at Namhkai, Meza, and Thegyaung, on troop concentrations and on supplies at Loi-Lum and Namhpakka; the ferry crossing at Shweli is hit by 12-hour delay bombs, the Nawnghkio landing ground is strafed, and numerous targets of opportunity along the Irrawaddy River and rail lines in N Burma are hit. Transports fly 300+ sorties to forward areas; the 166th Liaison Squadron (Commando), 1st Air Commando Group, moves from Asansol, India to Yazagyo with UC-64s and L-5s; the 427th Night Fighter Squadron, AAF, India-Burma Theater, based at Pandaveswar, India, sends detachment to operate from Myitkyina with P-61s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 6 B-24s from Guam escorting US Navy photo aircraft over Iwo Jima and the Bonin Islands, attack shipping at Futamiko in the Bonin; 1 B-24 from Saipan carrying out an unsuccessful shipping search, bombs Iwo Jima. 7 B-24s from Angaur Airfield hit oil storage on Malakal Island, Palau Islands and attack a bridge between Malakal and Koror Islands.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: the 433d Fighter Squadron, 475th Fighter Group, moves from Biak to Dulag with P-38s; the 501st Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 345th BG(Medium), moves from Biak to Dulag but continues to operate from Biak.

    EAST INDIES: Over Halmahera Island and in the Ceram Island area fighter-bombers and A-20s bomb airfields and various targets of opportunity.

    NEW GUINEA: Pegun Island, New Guinea, is blasted by 2 waves of 70 A-20s.

    PHILIPPINES: Aircraft from three USN carrier task groups (Task Group 38.1, TG 38.3, and TG 38.4) of Task Force 38, under Admiral McCain, hit Japanese shipping and port facilities at Manila and in central Luzon. At the former place, TF 38 planes sink light cruiser HIJMS Kiso, destroyers HIJMS Hatsuharu and Okinami, and auxiliary submarine chaser Cha; and five army cargo ships and as well as four merchant cargo ships, and damage destroyer HIJMS Ushio. At Cavite, Navy carrier planes sink destroyers HIJMS Akebono and Akishimo, a fleet tanker and a guardboat. TF 38 planes also sink an army cargo ship at Cabcaben, and an auxiliary submarine chaser Cha 116 some 20 nautical miles west of Cavite.
    In the Philippine Islands, B-24s pound Fabrica Airfield on Negros Island while fighter-bombers hit shipping and other targets of opportunity; a few fighter-bombers hit Legaspi Airfield; B-25s, with P-38 cover, hit San Roque Airfield and the town of Zamboanga on Mindanao Island;

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 181, NOVEMBER 13, 1944
    Under cover of a storm during the night of November 7‑8, an enemy force of approximately 200 troops, equipped with knee mortars and machine guns, went ashore on Ngeregong island northeast of Peleliu in the Palau Group. This island had previously been occupied by a small patrol of United States Marines. Several LCI's took off our patrol without casualties. Two of our gunboats and a destroyer blocked Denges Passage to the north from which the enemy troops had apparently come, and bombarded the island. On November 9 our planes bombed and strafed the island, sinking a barge.
    On November 9 Corsairs and Avengers of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing attacked Ngesang on Babelthuap Island in the Northern Palaus, sinking one barge and setting fire to a fuel tank. Moderate antiaircraft fire was en*countered. Hellcat fighters bombed Koror and Babelthuap. Corsairs sank a barge at Babelthuap and scored a direct bit on a radio station. Yap Island was bombed by Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing.
    Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing on November 10 sank a Japanese destroyer previously damaged near Golou in the Palau Islands. Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on November 10 bombed Koror Island starting large fires. Several small islands in the Northern Palaus were hit by Catalinas of Fleet Air Wing One and Corsairs and Avengers of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing in night operations, and two fuel dumps were set afire.
    Airfields on Peleliu Island and Angaur Island are now being used by United States land‑based aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and the Second Marine Aircraft Wing.
    On November 10 Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed air*strips on Iwo Jima causing large fires in storage areas. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered. Another force of Liberators bombed the Iwo Jima air*fields the next day. Three enemy fighters were seen in the air but did not attack our planes.
    Thunderbolts of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Pagan Island In the Marianas without encountering resistance on November 10 and 11. Cor*sairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing also attacked installations on Rota on November 10 and 11.
    On November 10 enemy‑held positions. in the Marshall Islands were further neutralized by Navy search Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Two and Corsairs of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing.

    1945
     
  3. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1935
    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaims the Philippine Islands a free commonwealth.


    1938
    UNITED STATES: At a secret White House meeting with his military leaders, President Franklin D. Roosevelt calls for an Army Air Corps of 20,000 airplanes. Although he can not immediately request sufficient funds for the program from Congress, Roosevelt commits his administration to a vastly expanded air force.


    1940
    MALAYA: Air Marshall R. Brooke-Popham arrives in Singapore as the new British Commander in Chief Far East Command.

    1941
    CHINA: Seven hundred fifty U.S. Marines are ordered out of Shanghai, Peiping, and Tientsin in Japanese occupied China. One hundred eighty three have transportation difficulties and will be imprisoned by the Japanese when hostilities begin.

    JAPAN: The Foreign Ministry sends the following message to the Japanese embassy in Hong Kong: "Though the Imperial Government hopes for great things from the Japan-American negotiations, they do not permit optimism for the future. Should the negotiations collapse, the international situation in which the Empire will find herself will be one of tremendous crisis. Accompanying this, the Empire's foreign policy as it has been decided by the cabinet, insofar as it pertains to China, is: (a) We will completely destroy British and American power in China, (b) We will take over all enemy concessions and enemy important rights and interests (customs and minerals, etc.) in China,) We will take over all rights and interests owned by enemy Powers, even though they might have connections with the new Chinese government, should it become necessary. In realizing these steps in China, we will avoid, insofar as possible, exhausting our veteran troops. Thus we will cope with a world war on a long-time scale. Should our reserves for total war and our future military strength wane, we have decided to reinforce them from the whole Far Eastern area. This has become the whole fundamental policy of the Empire. Therefore, in consideration of the desirability to lighten our personal and material load, we will encourage the activities of important Chinese in their efforts in the occupied territories insofar as is possible. Japan and China, working in cooperation, will take over military bases. Thus, operating wherever possible, we will realize peace throughout the entire Far East. At the same time, we place great importance upon the acquisition of materials (especially from unoccupied areas). In order to do this, all in the cabinet have concurred, in view of the necessity, in a reasonable relaxation of the various restrictions now in force (after you have duly realized the critical situation which has brought the above decisions into being you will, of course, wait for instructions from home before carrying them out).


    UNITED STATES: The Japanese Ambassador in Washington, NOMURA Kichisaburo, sends the following message to Foreign Minister MATSUOKA Yosuke in Tokyo: "However, I must tell you the following:
    (1) As I told you in a number of messages, the policy of the American Government in the Pacific is to stop any further moves on our part either southward or northward. With every economic weapon at their command, they have attempted to achieve this objective, and now they are contriving by every possible means to prepare for actual warfare.
    (2) In short, they are making every military and every other kind of preparation to prevent us from a thrust northward or a thrust southward; they are conspiring most actively with the nations concerned and rather than yield on this fundamental political policy of theirs in which they believe so firmly, they would not hesitate, I am sure, to fight us. It is not their intention, I know, to repeat such a thing as the Munich conference which took place several years ago and which turned out to be such a failure. Already I think the apex of German victories has been passed. Soviet resistance persists, and the possibility of a separate peace has receded, and hereafter this trend will be more and more in evidence.
    (3) The United States is sealing ever-friendlier relations with China, and insofar as possible she is assisting CHIANG. For the sake of peace in the Pacific, the United States would not favor us at the sacrifice of China. Therefore, the China problem might become the stumbling block to the pacification of the Pacific and as a result the possibility of the United States and Japan ever making up might vanish."


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: On USAAF Eleventh Air Force B-24 flies armed reconnaissance over Japanese-held Kiska and Attu Islands and bombs Holtz Bay and Chichagof on Attu with negative results. Bombers at Adak and Umnak Islands are alerted for shipping targets.

    (CBI) THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Tenth Air Force): INDIA AIR TASK FORCE (IATF): In India, the following squadrons of the 7th Bombardment Group begin operating or move to Gaya with B-24s: - 9th Bombardment Squadron based at Karachi, begins operating from Gaya with B-24s - 436th Bombardment Squadron moves from Ambon Lahabad to Gaya - 492d Bombardment Squadron moves from Karachi to Gaya

    NEW GUINEA: The New Guinea Force, which commands all Australian and U.S. forces in Papua and Northeast New Guinea, issues an attack plan for the reduction of the Buna-Gona beachhead in Papua New Guinea. Advance
    elements of 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, are consolidating positions at Natunga. Task Force Warren (128th Infantry Regiment of 32d Infantry Division and Australian 2/6th Independent Company) is consolidating and patrolling in the Oro Bay-Embogu-Embi area.
    On the Kokoda Trail, the Australian 25th Brigade starts crossing the improvised bridge at Wairopi, and the USAAF Fifth Air Force drops bridging equipment.
    In the air, a Fifth Air Force B-25 Mitchell bombs and strafes the track north of Soputa.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Rear Admiral NISHIMURA Shoji with heavy cruisers HIJMS Maya and Suzuya, light cruiser HIJMS Tenryu and destroyers HIJMS Yugumo, Makikumo and Kazegumo as the Support Force to Vice Admiral Mikawa Gunichi’s main body of heavy cruisers HIJMS Chokai and Kinugasa, light cruiser HIJMS Isuzu and two destroyers bombard Henderson Field with almost 1,000 eight-inch (20,3 centimeter) shells at 0130 hours.
    In the morning, Japanese heavy cruisers HIJMS Chokai, Kinugasa, Maya and Suzuya, light cruiser HIJMS Isuzu and Tenryu and six destroyers come under attack by planes from carrier Enterprise and from Henderson Field,
    Guadalcanal. HIJMS Kinugasa is sunk by USMC Dauntlesses of Marine VMSB 132, 15 nautical miles northwest of Rendova Island; HIJMS Maya, crashed by a crippled VB-10 SBD and Isuzu are damaged south of New Georgia Island; Chokai, Tenryu, and destroyer Ayanami are also damaged.
    Aircraft from the USN aircraft carrier USS Enterprise are joined by land-based USMC and USAAF aircraft in driving off the force that bombarded Henderson last night.
    In view of the pressing need for aircraft in the South Pacific Area, Admiral Chester W Nimitz, Commander Pacific Ocean Areas and Commander Pacific Fleet, is given more freedom to deploy his air weapons; he receives authority to distribute as he sees fit all available air units assigned to the South and Central Pacific provided he move units rather than individual aircraft and crews.
    In the afternoon, USMC and USN land-based SBD's and TBFs bomb a Japanese convoy off Guadalcanal, sinking two transports/cargo ships and five merchant transport/cargo ships. A cargo ship is damaged. U.S. losses are five SBDs, Wildcats vs. 13 Japanese Zero's fighters. One of the Wildcats lost was piloted by Lieutenant Colonel Harold W. Bauer, USMC. He had downed a "Zeke" bringing his total to ten and bails out of his aircraft but is never seen again. Admiral TANAKA's convoy, with four remaining transports, continues to Tassafaronga after nightfall to unload about 4,000 troops and a few tons of supplies.
    During the night of 14/15 November, the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal is fought between the Japanese and U.S. Navies.
    The Japanese forces, under Vice Admiral Kondo Nobutakare, are the battleship HIJMS Kirishima, heavy cruisers HIJMS Atago and Takao, light cruisers HIJMS Sendai and Nagara and the destroyers HIJMS Asagumo, Ayanami, Kagero, Oyashio, Shikinami, Uranami. The USN’s Task Force LOVE consists of the battleships USS Washington and South Dakota and the destroyers USS Benham, Gwin, Preston, and Walke under the command of Rear Admiral Willis "Ching" Lee, Commander Battleship Division 6. Lee arrives first about 2200 hours and radios Henderson Field for last minute intelligence. There are no preplanned radio codes, so Lee is forced to radio "Cactus, this is Lee. Tell your boss 'Ching' Lee is here and wants the latest information. " At 2317 hours, motor torpedo boat (PTs) from Tulagi Island are spotted moving in. Lee radios "Refer your big boss about Ching Lee; Chinese, catchee? Call off your boys!" Henderson Field has no new information for him.
    Meanwhile Admiral Kondo, north of Savo Island, splits his force with one cruiser and three destroyers heading east of Savo and the bombardment force west. At 0001 hours, Washington makes radar contact with enemy east of Savo and at 0016 hours, Washington opens fire at 18,500 yards using radar ranges and optical train. About a minute later, South Dakota opens fire on the nearest ship of the main group at a range of 15,700 yards,using radar control.. Their targets are the ships east of Savo.
    At 0019 hours, after the Washington's seventh or eighth salvo, her flaming target disappears and is presumed to have sunk. Several reports reach Admiral Kondo identifying the US ships as battleships, Kondo does not believe them. By 2358 hours lookouts on the flagship heavy cruiser HIJMS Atago re-identify USS South Dakota as a cruiser.
    At 2359 hours, the Japanese recognize their error but Admiral Kondo still hesitates but Japanese "Long Lance" torpedoes are launched. At midnight, heavy cruisers HIJMS Atago's searchlights open on battleship USS South Dakota and Admiral KONDO is convinced about her size. This time the Japanese torpedoes miss, but South Dakota has an electric fault that takes her guns out of an early part of the battle and she is hit with 27 shells. The damage topside knocks out all radios, most radar and control crew.
    USS Washington now takes battleship HIJMS Kirishima under fire while South Dakota pulls out of the fight to concentrate on damage control. The Japanese lose Kirishima and a destroyer, the US loses 3 destroyers with damage to South Dakota and destroyer Gwin.

    UNITED STATES: At the Colorado River Relocation Camp for Japanese-Americans near Poston, Arizona, two popular inmates are arrested accused of attacking a man widely perceived as an informer. This incident soon mushrooms into a mass strike.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): Betio Island on Tarawa Atoll bombed by 17 B24s from Ellice Island bases (Nukufetau), 55 quarter-ton bombs dropped as well as 744 30-lb. fragmentation bombs, with good percentage falling in target area; 4 large fires started near runway and grounded plane possibly destroyed; AA fire intense at first but decreases. No interception made. 1 B24 fails to return. Later 9 B24s bomb Tarawa using 810 fragmentation bombs while 9 others drop 80 demolition and fragmentation bombs on Mili; fires and explosions result at latter target.
    Greenwich Island. Bivouac area on Greenwich Island found deserted by attacking Allied recon plane.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): P-70 night fighters hit the Shortland-Faisi area, claiming a seaplane and 2 barges destroyed.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): NEW GUINEA: Allied ground activity 1imited to arty fire against small groups of Japanese. In the Finschhafen area, Thirteen Japanese bombers unsuccessfully raid Finschhafen. Nine B-25's raid Sio and coastal area to the SE.
    During night raid on Babo, Dutch New Guinea, 3 RAAF PBY's destroy grounded bombers, probably destroy others,: and start large fires in fuel and ammunition dumps. Another RAAF PBY starts fires at Kaimana.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Battle of the Cocoanut Grove concludes with withdrawal of Japanese from position S of junction Numa-Numa and East-West trails, following renewed attacks by Allied troops with tank'support. Supporting ground forces, 20 TBFs bomb and strafe Japanese positions NE of Piva; ground forces report excellent results. 49 SBDs and 8 TBFs with fighter escort attack Ballale, dropping 30 tons of bombs with good results, 11 hits observed on runway; intense AA fire but no interception encountered.
    F4Us strafe Bougainville coast from Kieta northward.
    Clearing of few remaining Japanese from Treasury Is. continues.

    BURMA: Road and RR communications in W Burma are target for several attacks. 4 A-36 bomb and strafe enemy barracks at Noye Bun. A Supply dump 4 miles SW of Maingkwan and the Walabum-Shaduzup road; further south road bridge at Mogaung and town of Manywet hit by six P-51s and 8 A-36's with excellent results. Center span of bridge at Mogaung and west and south approaches are in ruins.Later Mogaung again attacked by twelve A-36's and six P-51's which start many fires throughout town
    In central Burma 11 B-24's, then 6 B-25's bomb Maymyo and Kalewa; formation attacked by 16 enemy aircraft of which 5 are destroyed,1 probably, and 1 damaged; 3 B-24's lost.
    RAF hits buildings in Kalemyo sector and in an enemyvillage near Buthedaung in Arakan district, sets fi're to bar-racks at Padaung near the E end of the Taungup Pass road, anddestroys several trucks and river craft. During the evening7 craft in-the Akyab area are damfaged and setafire

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In E Burma and in the China-Burma boundary areas 8 B-25s bomb Wanling and Hsenwi, Burma; 15 P-38s and P-40s on armed reconnaissance hit targets of opportunity around Wanling, Burma and Mangshih, China.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) area, the Chinese 22d Division, upon taking Man-tha with ease and blocking the road from Bhamo, is ordered to continue the drive to Si-u. The Chinese 38th Division’s 114th and 113th Regiments are converging on Bhamo: the 114th, pressing west toward the town, is bitterly opposed by the Japanese in the Mornauk area, 8 miles east of Bhamo; the 113th, upon crossing the Taping River at Myothit, moves west along the south bank of the river toward Bhamo.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 B-25s bomb a supply area near Lashio; 56 fighter-bombers hit supply areas, enemy concentrations, town areas, and general targets of opportunity at Tingka, China and Kutkai, Sandaya, Palaung, Kawlin, and in the Shwebo-Kyaukmyaung area. 12 support ground forces in the Pinwe area, 4 bomb Sindaw River bridges and 30+ others maintain patrols S of Myitkyina. 300+ transport sorties are flown to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 22 Saipan and Guam based B-24s bomb Woleai, hitting an airfield and adjacent installations and firing an oil dump. 4 Saipan based P-47s hit the airfield on Pagan. During the night of 14/15 Nov a B-24 from Saipan on a snooper mission attacks shipping SW of the Bonin.

    BONIN ISLANDS: Project MIKE continues as USAAF B-24s (42d Bomb Squadron) lay six mines in effective locations off Ani Jima and Haha Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: the 310th Bombardment Wing (Medium) moves from Morotai to Leyte; the ground echelon of the 418th Night Fighter Squadron, 13 AF, moves from Morotai to Dulag (the air echelon remains on Morotai with P-61s). The 370th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 307th BG (Heavy), moves form Wakde to Morotai with B-24s.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, B-24s strike Langoan Airfield on the northeastern tip of Celebes Island.

    NEW GUINEA: B-25s pound Pegun Island, New Guinea in preparation for allied amphibious landings early the following morning

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area, Lieutenant General Walter Krueger, Commanding General Sixth Army, orders Major General Franklin Sibert, Commanding General X Corps, to commit the 32d Infantry Division, originally intended to operate on southern Samar, in the zone of the 24th Infantry Division in order to relieve elements of that division. Breakneck Ridge is now largely clear, but the Japanese still retain several adjacent spurs. The 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, patrols actively on Kilay Ridge; supplies for the battalion are hand carried by Filipinos from Consuegra. In the XXIV Corps area, the 32d Infantry Regiment of 7th Infantry Division is ordered to start north to the Damulaan-Caridad area and upon order to advance upon Ormoc.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s, with P-38 and P-47 cover, bomb Bacalod (Bacolod) Airfield on Negros Island while fighter-bombers hit trucks and buildings in the Valencia, Mindanao Island area. On Leyte Island, fighter-bombers attack targets near Linao and hit shipping south of Ormoc. On Cebu Island, B-25s and fighter-bombers attack Lahug and Opon Airfields.
    USN Task Force 38 (Rear Admiral Frederick C. Sherman) air strikes against Japanese shipping in Philippines continue. At Manila, Navy carrier-based planes sink a transport, a merchant tanker, two merchant cargo ships, and damage a transport and an army cargo ship; a cargo ship is sunk just outside Manila Bay. Off Mindoro, F6Fs from the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown attack Japanese convoy SIMA-04, sinking a merchant tanker; and damaging an army cargo ship as well as four escorting submarine chasers.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 182, NOVEMBER 14, 1944
    Hellcat fighters, Avenger torpedo planes and Helldiver bombers from car*rier task groups of the Pacific Fleet attacked enemy shipping and installations in and around Manila Bay on November 12 (West Longitude Date). The following damage was done to enemy shipping:
    One light cruiser badly damaged.
    Two destroyers exploded.
    An estimated 11 cargo vessels and oilers sunk or blazing.
    One floating dock hit by torpedoes.
    Many docks in Manila Bay and at Cavite Navy Yard were struck.
    In the attack, 18 of 20 intercepting enemy aircraft were shot down over Luzon and 10 others were shot down near the task groups.
    An estimated 130 to 140 single and twin‑engined enemy planes on Legaspi, Manila and Clark Airstrips were strafed.
    One of our surface ships was damaged.
    The carrier task groups engaged in this operation were under the tactical command of Rear Admiral Frederick C. Sherman, United States Navy.
    Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing strafed and bombed the Northern Palau Area on November 11. One small enemy vessel was sunk. Hellcats bombed Koror , Malakal and Arakabesan in the Palaus on the same day. Avengers and Corsairs loosed bombs on the Yap Airstrip the same day. Liberators of the Seventh Air Force bombed a power station at Koror on November 11, but results were not observed.
    A Navy search Liberator of Fleet Air Wing One dropped bombs on Iwo Jima in the Bonins on November 11. Results were unobserved.
    Aircraft of Fleet Air Wing One bombed islands in the Bonins on Novem*ber 13. A near miss was scored on a medium cargo vessel, and two near misses on an escort surface craft at Chichi Jima. A few airborne enemy planes which were over Iwo Jima did not attack our planes.

    1945

     
  4. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 5,598

    1939
    INDIAN OCEAN: The British motor tanker AFRICA SHELL (706 BRT) is stopped and sunk by the GRAF SPEE.

    1941
    HONG KONG: The converted passenger liner Awatea arrived here this evening, carrying 2,000 Canadian troops under Brigadier J Lawson. The Canadians will boost the garrison in Hong Kong, but, as Churchill himself has pointed out, two semi-trained battalions are unlikely to deter Japan from war, but will merely increase the numbers of prisoners the Japanese can take. The Canadians seem only too aware of this. "Oh God, another Dunkirk," Signalman William Allister said when he heard where he was going. "No fella," another voice added, "at Dunkirk they had somewhere to go."

    U.S.A.: Saburo Kurusu, an experienced diplomat, arrives in Washington to make a last-ditch effort to reach a compromise with the US.
    Marshall holds a press conference at which he stated that V Bomber Command constituted the "greatest concentration of heavy bomber strength anywhere in the world"; when queried over the inability of the B-17's in the Philippines to bomb Japan and to return to Clark AAF, Marshall stated that the USSR would allow the airplanes to refuel at Vladivostok.

    1942
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): The 21st Bombardment Squadron, 30th BG (under control of the 28th Composite Group), ceases operating from Adak and returns to base on Umnak with B-24s. The 406th Bombardment Squadron, 41st BG (Medium) (attached to 28th Composite Group), arrives at Elmendorf Field, Anchorage from the US with A-29s and B-18s (the squadron has been operating from Alaska since Jun 42).

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s attack shipping in Rabaul Harbor on New Britain Island.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Australians complete bridges on the Kumusi River and the Australian 25th Brigade its crossing of the river and heads for Gona. The 16th Brigade begins crossing the river but only headquarters and one battalion gets across by the end of the day.
    USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20's strafe targets near Gona while B-25 Mitchells and B-26 Marauders hit antiaircraft positions at Buna and Soputa as U.S. and Australian ground forces prepare to move against the Buna-Gona beachhead.

    AUSTRALIA: The 435th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 19th Bombardment Group (Heavy), begins a movement from Townsville, Australia to the US (the squadron will re-equip with B-29s and return to the Pacific in Aug 1945).

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Admiral Tanaka heads his destroyers north from Guadalcanal at 0430 after beaching the four remaining transports from his convoy. Between 0600 and 0845 the Cactus Air Force and aircraft from the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise attack and sink these ships and the supplies unloaded on shore. They are joined by 155mm artillery from the 244th Coast Artillery Regiment and two of the 5-inch (12.7 centimeter) coast defense guns of the Marines. Destroyer USS Meade, which escorted the cargo ship SS Okpara to Guadalcanal, joins in.
    She ignites blazes on the three transports not already on fire from the aircraft strikes. Later in the day the Cactus Air Force strikes at some of the transports abandoned previously in the slot.
    The air and sea battle which has raged around Guadalcanal has been fought to enable each side to resupply their forces on the island. The Japanese have landed 2,000 troops with few supplies and losing all transports committed. The U.S. lands over 5,500 men (two battalions of the 182nd Infantry Regiment) and full supplies, losing no transports.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 20+ B-24's from Canton in the Phoenix and Nanumea bomb Jaluit, Mille, and Makin.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 20 B-24's are dispatched against the Hong Kong-Kowloon area. Bad weather prevents 15 bombers from bombing the targets; 5 bomb the docks at Kowloon.

    BURMA: On the north Burma front, the Chinese 38th Infantry Division is moving reinforcements forward for the 112th Regiment. The 114th Regiment arrives at the front and is followed in early December by the 113th.
    In the 11th Army Group's Fourteenth Army sector, the Japanese take Fort White in IV Corps area, having forced the British to abandon it.
    Four A-36's attack an enemy camp at Noye Bun, hitting numerous buildings in the target area with good results. In W Burma, 8, A-36's, 1 B25, and 4 P-51's bomb and strafe Kamaing, starting several fires, while 4 A-36s carry out a similar attack on the Shaduzup-Maingkwan and Kamaing-Hanywet roads; several buildings, hashas, and a jetty hit. Farther S, 6 B-25's and 8 P-51's attack RR bridges N of Shwebo, scoring hits and near misses.
    RAF fighters attack enemy oil 'field installations at Nyaunghla, starting fires, and then shoot up 26 river craft on the lower Irrawaddy River. Other aircraft. damage communications in Akyab area and enemy positions in Kalefmyo 'sector.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 20 B-24's strike Buka Airfield. 18 B-24's bomb Kahili; fighter patrols destroy or damage several barges along the coast and destroy 2 fuel dumps at Tonolai. The 72d Bombardment Squadron, 5th BG (Heavy), ceases operating from Guadalcanal and returns to it's base at Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides with B-24's. The 106th Reconnaissance Squadron (Bombardment), III Reconnaissance Command, arrives on Guadalcanal from the US with B 25's. The squadron will be reassigned to the Thirteenth Air Force on 19 Nov and will fly it's first mission on 30 Jan 44. The 419th Night Fighter Squadron, XIII Fighter Command, arrives on Guadalcanal from the US with P-38's and P-70's. The squadron will fly it's first mission on 10 Dec.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 30+ B-24's pound Alexishafen; 88 B-25's heading for Wewak and Boram with an escort of 16 P-40's are intercepted by Japanese fighters that are escorting bombers attacking Gusap; the resulting battle causes the B-25's to abort the attack; the US airplanes claim 20 of the enemy shot down; 2 P-40's are lost; P-47's claim 5 more aircraft destroyed over Wewak. The 68th Troop Carrier Squadron, 433d Troop Carrier Group transfers from Port Moresby to Nadzab, New Guinea with C-47's.

    NEW IRELAND: PBYs on night patrol damage large AK in St. George's Channel and leave it beached: also damage 6,000-ton AK in convoy NE of Rabaul with 2 direct hits.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the beachhead perimeter is expanded to the inland defense line Dog.

    RAAF: Lost after a raid against Rabaul is Beaufort A9-217. Force landed is Boomerang A46-136 after being damaged by P-38 piloted by Gerald Johnson

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 8 B-25s weather-abort an armed photo reconnaissance over Paramushiru Island.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 19 B-25s and 16 P-51s and P-40s over SW China, W Burma, and N Indochina hit railroad targets, villages, town areas, and general targets of opportunity at or near man Pwe and Wanling, Burma; Mangshih and Tingka, China; Quang Yen, Nam Dinh, and Thanh Hoa, French Indochina.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 B-25s attack the airfield at Kawlin; 42 P-47s hit supplies, troop and vehicle concentrations, and targets of opportunity at Mansak, Gyogon, Banmauk, Namtao, and Wuntho; 20 support ground forces in the Pinwe area while 16 attack bypass bridges at Kawnghka and Namhkai, knocking out the latter; 8 P-47s bomb Kyaikthin rail sidings and junction, 8 strafe Anisakan Airfield, and 12 hit targets of opportunity during N Burma road sweeps. 280 transport sorties are flown.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): Guam based B-24s on a shipping strike to the Bonin, attack vessels at Haha Jima and near Chichi Jima. 1 Saipan Island-based B-24, during the night of 15/16 Nov snooper mission, bombs Iwo Jima after failing to find shipping targets in the Bonin.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 22d and 43d BGs move from Owi to Leyte; the 8th Bombardment Squadron, 3d BG, moves from Hollandia to Dulag; the 20th Combat Mapping Squadron, 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, moves from Biak Island to Dulag (air echelon continues operating from Biak Island with F-7s; the 80th Fighter Squadron, 8th Fighter Group, moves from Morotai to Dulag but continues to operate from Morotai with P-38s. 68th Troop Carrier Squadron, 433d Troop Carrier Group, moves from Nadzab to Biak (detachment remains at Biak) with C-47s.

    EAST INDIES: In NE Celebes B-24s bomb Tanamon, Celebes Island while other B-24s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers hit scattered targets of opportunity on Celebes and Halmahera Islands.

    NEW GUINEA: A regiment of the US 31st Division occupies Mapia Island, 160 miles north of the west end of New Guinea. B-25s and fighter-bombers support the allied amphibious landings.

    PHILIPINES: In the Philippine Islands, B-24s, with P-38 support, bomb La Carlota Airfield while B-25s hit Lahug; B-25s and fighter-bombers attack targets of opportunity on Cebu and shipping off the W coast of Leyte Island; on Mindanao Island B-24s hit 3 airfields while P-38s hit shipping and other targets of opportunity;

    USN Communique:
    DETAILS OF SURFACE BOMBARDMENT OF MARCUS ISLAND
    An advanced base in the Western Pacific, October 9‑(Delayed)‑In a surprise dawn assault against another of Japan's inner island defenses, U. S. Navy surface units today heavily bombarded enemy shore installations on strategic Marcus Island.
    It was the first American surface ship bombardment of the island, which lies 989 miles southeast of the Japanese mainland and 727 miles northeast of the U. S.‑held Mariana Group.
    Units of the Third Fleet, cruisers and destroyers commanded by Rear Admiral Allan E. Smith, U. S. N., of Fairfax, Virginia, lobbed heavy caliber shells into the enemy positions intermittently during the 15‑hour attack period. Shore battery fire directed against the American warships was moderate. Most of the island defense batteries were silenced during the engagement.
    There was no damage to the American ships.
    In a continuous procession, the warships steamed past the island and hammered defense positions with accurate 8‑inch and 5‑inch rifle fire. Several fires were started and hits were scored on the enemy radio station, operations and administration buildings, and other shore installations.
    The attack was conducted in three phases and was concluded with a night operation during which the American warships used smoke screens and night emergency pyrotechnics.
    Air spotting revealed that the enemy garrison sustained considerable damage in the battering assault by the big Navy guns.
    There was unrestricted visibility and an unlimited ceiling, but no Jap aircraft was encountered.
    Rear Admiral Smith's flagship during the engagement, a veteran of numerous Pacific bombardments, is commanded by Captain Henry Hartley, USN, of Bladensburg, Maryland. Other cruisers and destroyers supported the assault with sustained gun fire.

    1945
     
  5. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1939
    INDIAN OCEAN: German armored ship Admiral Graf Spee stops Dutch freighter SS Mapia but, since the latter is a neutral ship, permits her to proceed unharmed.

    1941
    HONG KONG: The converted passenger liner SS Awatea, escorted by the armed merchant cruiser HMCS Prince Robert (F 56), arrives here this evening, carrying two battalions consisting of 96 officers (plus two Auxiliary Services supervisors) and 1,877 Canadian troops under Brigadier John Lawson, Commanding Officer West Brigade. The units are The Royal Rifles of Canada and The Winnipeg Grenadiers.
    The Canadians will boost the garrison in Hong Kong, but, as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill
    himself has pointed out, two semi-trained battalions are unlikely to deter Japan from war, but will merely increase the numbers of prisoners the Japanese can take. The Canadians seem only too aware of this. "Oh God, another Dunkirk," Signalman William Allister said when he heard where he was going. "No fella," another voice added, "at Dunkirk they had somewhere to go."
    The 212 vehicles assigned to the force are aboard the freighter SS Don Jose but these vehicles will never reach Hong Kong. The Don Jose had only just reached Manila, Philippine Islands when the war with Japan begins, and the U.S. forces are given approval to use the Canadian equipment in the defense of the Philippines.


    JAPAN: Two units of the Japanese Navy's Advance Group, Pearl Harbor Strike Force, depart Yokosuka today. The 2nd Submarine Unit consists of seven submarines two of which are carrying "Glen" seaplanes. All seven arrive on station off Hawaii on 6 December; one, with a "Glen", is stationed about 26 nautical miles north of Oahu; three are station between Kauai and Oahu, and three, one with a "Glen", are stationed between Oahu and Molokai. One submarine of the Support Group, HIJMS I-10, also departs. On 7 December, HIJMS I-10 is underway between the Fiji and Samoa Islands.

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A USAAF Eleventh Air Force weather reconnaissance flight is flown over Japanese-held Kiska and Attu Islands. On Attu Island, demolition charges are dropped on Holtz Bay, antiaircraft guns, and on a village; results are not observed.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: On New Britain Island, the Japanese establish the 8th Army Area at Rabaul under command of Lieutenant General IMAMURA Hitoshi. This command comprises two armies: the 17th, charged with operations in the Solomon Islands, and the 18th, to operate in New Guinea.

    NEW CALEDONIA: Admiral William F. Halsey, commander of the South Pacific Area and commander of the South Pacific Force, moves the responsibility for handling cargo discharge and loading at Noumea to the Army. Brigadier General Raymond E.S. Williamson applies skill and leadership to this task, successfully!

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the U.S. 32d Infantry and Australian 7th Divisions move forward to eliminate the Buna-Gona beachhead, the 32d toward Buna and 7th toward Gona and Sanananda. The Japanese, expected to be few and dispirited, are prepared for a determined stand and have organized a series of strong positions favored by terrain for defense.
    Colonel Yokayama Yosuke commands all forces west of the Girua River and Captain Yasuda Yoshitatsu those east of river. In the Australian 7th Division sector on the west, the 25th Brigade moves toward Gona and Sanananda and the 16th Brigade completes crossing the Kumusi River and moves forward to Popondetta, about 15 miles SW of Buna. To the east, the U.S. 32d Infantry Division's 126th Infantry Regiment heads for Buna along the axis Inonda-Horanda- Dobodura, and the Warren Force (based on 128th Infantry Regiment) moves the along coast toward Cape Endaiadere. Although by evening the Australian artillery is employed to support coastal advance, Warren Force suffers severe blow when small craft bringing urgently needed supplies are destroyed by Japanese planes; among personnel embarked on these is Major General Edwin F. Harding, Commanding General U.S. 32d Infantry Division, who swims to shore.
    In the air over Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-26's, B-25', and A-20's attack the areas around Buna, Gona, Soputa, Sanananda, and Giruwa, hitting antiaircraft positions, buildings, barges, and troop concentrations.

    UNITED STATES: The first USN/USMC night fighter squadron, Marine Night Fighting Squadron Five Hundred Thirty One [VMF(N)-531] , is commissioned at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina. The first aircraft received were two SNJ-4 Texan trainers later supplemented with SB2A-4 Buccaneers.
    The squadron will be assigned two PV-1 Venturas equipped with Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF) equipment, Very High Frequency (VHF) radio sets and British Airborne Intercept (A.I.) Radar Mk. IV. Unlike the USN's PV-1 patrol aircraft, the crew of the Marine aircraft consisted of three men, the pilot, radar operator and dorsal turret gunner.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): B-24's from Nanumea and Nukufeta bomb Jaluit and Maloelap. Single aircraft hit Kwajalein and Makin and Tarawa.

    AMERICAN SAMOA: The USMC's Central Pacific Combat Air Transport Service (CenCATS) is activated at Tutuila Airfield at Tafuna on Tutuila Island. This unit will oversee Marine transport units in the Central Pacific.

    INDIA: Lieutenant General George E. Stratemeyer's Headquarters, Army Air Forces, India-Burma Sector, virtually rejects the proposals by Major General Claire Chennault, Commanding General USAAF Fourteenth Air Force, for 1944 for logistical reasons. Hump tonnage requested cannot be supplied. Since the Operation TWILIGHT plan for B-29 Superfortresses to be brought to the U.S. Army's China-Burma-India Theater is approved, the priority of Fourteenth Air Force must be lowered.

    CEYLON: Admiral Louis Mountbatten activates his new command, the South East Asia Command (SEAC), and takes over operational control from Commander-in-Chief India. Movement orders are issued to U.S. forces who are to help operate the Bengal and Assam railroad.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 11 B-24's, 2 B-25's, and 4 P-40's attack the docks at Kowloon; 2 B-25's damage 2 freighters near Nampang and Saint John , 2 more score hits on a tanker off the China coast S of Swatow, and 2 others bomb barracks and a warehouse on Nampang ; 6 P-40's on armed reconnaissance in the Yen Bay-Dong Cuong area of French Indochina strafe railroad stations and barracks; 1 B-25 and 12 P-40's hit a cavalry unit, barge, houses, and numerous sampans at Shihmen; the Li-Chou area also is attacked.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): During the night of 15/16 Nov P-70's harass Kahili Airfield. In the daylight, 20 B-25's and 4 B-24's pound Buka Airfield, 20+ other B-25's fly sweeps over areas of the Bougainville coastline, Buka Passage, and Sohano; supply dumps and barges are hit; 30+ P-40's and P-39's also carry out sweeps over the area, hitting gun positions and other targets in the Buka Passage, several targets of opportunity along the E coast, Kieta Harbor, Tonolai Harbor, and Ballale. Lost is P-40N Kittyhawk NZ3166.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, a continuous road through the beachhead is completed, vastly improving supply situation.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-25's hit installations near Finschhafen and bomb and strafe a coastal track west of Reiss Point; P-39's, with P-40's covering, strafe barges from Saidor to Madang. P-38'a battle a large force of fighters over Wewak, destroying 6; 2 P-38's are lost including P-38H Lightning 42-66826. The 7th Fighter Squadron, 49th Fighter Group, transfers from Dobodura to Gusap with P-40's and P-47's.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, the Australian 26th Brigade, 9th Division, begins their advance on Sattelberg. Meanwhile, the 24th Brigade establishes positions north of Scarlet Beach; Scarlet Beach is located about 5.5 miles north of Finschhafen.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Corvina is sunk by Japanese submarine HIJMS I-176, about 173 nautical miles SSE of Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, in position 05.05N, 151.10E; all 82 crewmen are lost. Corvina is the only USN submarine sunk by a Japanese submarine in World War II.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 23 B-24s bomb Changsha; 8 B-25s hit Lohochai and bomb the Wanling, Burma area. In French Indochina, 16 B-25s hit Nghia Trang, Duc Tho, Nha Trang, and Do Len. 70+ P-40s and P-51s over SE and SW China on armed reconnaissance attack road, river, and rail traffic, town areas, and other targets of opportunity at several scattered locations.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 30 P-47s hit troop concentrations and supply areas at Naungmo, Nawngmoloi, and Lashio; 11 support ground forces in the Pinwe area, 4 attack bridges at Meza and over the Sindaw River; 4 bomb the Meza railroad station, 16 sweep the railroad from Sagaing to Kanbalu, and 16 strafe Nawnghkioand Hsumhsai Airfields. Transports fly 270+ sorties to forward bases and frontline areas.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) area, the British 36th Division is still held up in the railroad corridor by stubborn opposition in the Pinwe area. Two companies are isolated by a Japanese roadblock and have to be withdrawn.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 12 Saipan Island-based B-24s bomb shipping at Chichi Jima Island while 2 others attack barges at Haha Jima. 12 P-47s and 3 P-38s hit the airfield on Pagan in the first combat strike by P-38s in the Mariana Islands. During the night of 16/17 Nov a snooper mission in the Bonin Islands, a B-24 attacks shipping.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Colonel Willard R Wolfinbarger becomes Commanding Officer of the XIII Fighter Command. Units moving to Leyte: HQ 3d BG and 90th Bombardment Squadron from Hollandia, New Guinea with A-20s; HQ 348th Fighter Group from Noemfoor.
    EAST INDIES: In the Kendari area and on the northeast peninsula of Celebes Island, and on Halmahera Island in the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers pound airfields, villages and shipping. B-25 also support ground forces in the Mapia Island and bomb Namlea Airfield on Boeroe Island.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: LEYTE In the U.S. Sixth Armys X Corps area on Leyte, two battalions of the 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, begin a drive on Ormoc, passing through the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, on Breakneck Ridge. One battalion is soon halted but the second pushes forward 350 yards without opposition.
    In the central Philippines and in the Mindanao Island area, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s, B-24s, and fighter-bombers hit airfields, harbors, shipping, and targets of opportunity.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 183, NOVEMBER 16, 1944
    A revision based on evidence gathered after the carrier task group at¬tacks in the Manila Bay Area on November 12 (West Longitude Date) raises the damage figures (given in communiqué Number 182) on Jap ship losses. It is now known that:
    A light cruiser was sunk, it had been reported as badly damaged.
    Four destroyers were sunk; two had been reported as exploded.
    Eleven cargo vessels and oilers were sunk; this number had been reported as sunk or blazing.
    There are no other revisions of any information contained in communiqué Number 182.
    On the night of November 10 11 (West Longitude Date) search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing One bombed airplane storage areas on Iwo Jima in the Bonin Islands. Weak fighter opposition was encountered. On November 12 Navy search Liberators again bombed installations on Iwo Jima and scored near misses on a medium cargo vessel at Chichi Jima. The following day a Navy search Liberator was credited with probable hits on a small cargo ship near Iwo Jima. On November 13 a Mitchell of tile Second Marine Aircraft Wing made possible hits on a medium cargo vessel near Haha Jima.
    Search Venturas of Fleet Air Wing One bombed installations on the Yap Airstrip on the night of November 10 11, meeting meager antiaircraft fire. On November 12 Corsairs and Hellcats of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing with Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing One bombed and destroyed warehouses and vehicles on Japanese bases in the Northern Palau Islands. Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing struck the airstrip on Yap on the same day.
    Strafing Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing sank several barges and small craft on November 13 in the Northern Palaus and Yap areas and
    struck the airstrip on Yap, and Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force pounded docks and a radio station on Arakabesan. Hellcats of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing made harassing attacks on Japanese bases in the Palaus on the night of November 13.
    On November 13 bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Navy search Liberators struck the airstrip and installations on Woleai in the Western Carolines.
    Avengers and Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing bombed Rota in the Marianas on November 12 13. Thunderbolts of the Seventh Army Air Force hit Pagan on November 13.
    Continuing neutralization raids were made in the Marshalls on Novem¬ber 11. Corsairs of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and a Navy search Ventura of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Jaluit on the same day. Nine fires were seen. Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing at¬tacked installations at Mille on November 11.

    1945

     
  6. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1936
    GERMANY: The German and Japanese governments sign an agreement against Communism, which, in practice, is an extension of the Rome-Berlin Axis and a counterweight to the Franco-Soviet alliance.


    1941
    CHINA: Nationalist Chinese leader Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek urges the western democracies to take action against Japanese aggression.

    JAPAN: Foreign Minister TOGO Shigenori says an amicable conclusion of Japan's negotiations with the United States was by no means impossible ". . . if the Government of the United States are, on the one hand, as genuinely solicitous for world peace as are the Imperial Government, and on the other understand Japan's natural requirements and her position in East Asia and consider the situation as it exists there in the light of realities," but Japan would face any threat to its empire or compromise of its prestige with firm resolve. ". . . there is naturally a limit to our conciliatory attitude."
    U.S. Ambassador to Japan Joseph Grew warns the United States of the inability of the Embassy to warn of Japanese attack stating, "I take into account the probability of the Japanese exploiting every possible tactical advantage, such as surprise and initiative."


    UNITED STATES: Japanese special envoy to the U.S. KURUSU Saburo and Ambassador Admiral NOMURA Kichisaburo confer with Secretary of State Cordell Hull and President Franklin D. Roosevelt. KURUSU tells the President that Germany has not requested Japan to fight.

    1942
    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: On New Britain Island, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s bomb Gasmata while a lone B-24 Liberator bombs the wharf area at Rabaul.

    BURMA: The amphibious operation against Akyab is cancelled by General Archibald Wavell, Commander-in- Chief India.. He then orders an advance by the 14th Indian Division which is more limited. It will advance down the Mayu Peninsula.

    EAST INDIES: Six Australian Beaufighter Mk ICs of No. 31 Squadron based at RAAF Coomalie Creek, Northern Territory, Australia, attack Moabisse and Bobonaro in Portugese East Timor with the loss of one aircraft.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Four USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-40s hit construction equipment at Dong Cuong Airfield.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, Australian and U.S. forces continue toward the Japanese beachhead in the Buna-Gona area. The Australian 16th Brigade, Maroubra Force, spends the night between Isivita and Sangara, about 10 miles SW of Popondetta. The U.S. 32d Infantry Division's Task Force Warren suffers another setback as Japanese planes put two more supply luggers out of action, leaving only one serviceable and necessitating supply of vital items by air until more luggers become available. The Wairopi Patrol (units of the U.S. 32d Infantry Division) reports to the Australian 7th Division at Wairopi.
    Japanese destroyers land the III/229th Battalion and 300 reinforcements for the 144th Regiment at Basabua, 2 miles E of Gona in the evening.
    The strong fortifications built by the Japanese since September now have a full complement of defenders.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-26s hit Gona Mission as the US 32d Infantry and Australian 7th Divisions continue to move toward the Buna-Gona beachhead. B-25s bomb airfields at Lae, Northeast New Guinea.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 20+ B-24's from Funafuti Atoll and Canton bomb Mille Atoll, Maloelap Atoll in the Marshalls, and Tarawa Atoll in the Gilberts.

    AUSTRALIA: USN submarine USS Capelin departs Darwin, Northern Territory, on her second war patrol for Molucca and Celebes Seas in the Netherlands East Indies. She is never heard from again. Capelin is
    never heard from again; radio silence is broken in the attempt to reach her on 9 December, but without success. Japanese records studied after the war list an attack on a supposed United States submarine on 23 November, off Kaoe Bay, Halmahera Island, Netherlands East Indies, but the evidence of an actual contact was slight, and the action is incomplete. This is, however, the only reported attack in the appropriate area at that time.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, Australians of 9th Division open an assault against Sattelberg, which is suited by nature for defense. Sattelberg, a high peak and the key to the occupation of the Huon Peninsula, involves a hard, four-month campaign for the 9th Division. The 20th, 24th and 26th Brigades, assisted by tanks, aircraft, and artillery, participate in the battle. In the air, 58 USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24 Liberators are dispatched to support an attack by the Australian 9th Division on Sattelberg, but because of bad weather only three B-24s, along with 12 RAAF aircraft, get through to the target. P-47 Thunderbolts strafe Japanese shipping between Saidor and Finschhafen.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The final elements of the 21st Marine Regiment arrive.
    In the Solomons Sea at 0350 hours local, Japanese "Judy" bombers attack a convoy carrying Marine reinforcements to Bougainville Island, Solomon Islands. High-speed transport USS McKean (APD-5) is struck by a torpedo and the after magazine, containing the depth charges, explodes and ruptures the fuel tanks. Minutes later the forward magazine blows up and the ship begins to sink by the stern. The ship was carrying 185 Marines; 64 of her crew and 52 Marines are lost. The ship sinks about 21 nautical miles SSW of Torokina, Bougainville, in position 06.31S, 154.52E.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 8 P-40's strafe the airfield and barracks at Kengtung, 4 others hit construction equipment at Dong Cuong Airfield in French Indochina and 8 attack Pingkai and targets of opportunity between Pingkai and Tahsai on the Salween River.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): In the Solomons, 30+ B-25's hit the airfield on Buka and surrounding areas during the night of 16/17 Nov; 2 squadrons of B-24's follow with a daylight strike on the same target; 8 other B-24's bomb Buka and Bonis at various times during the night of 16/17 Nov; during the afternoon 3 B-25's hit Kieta.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies during the night of 17/18 November, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s bomb Surabaja (Surabaya) and Tjepoe, Java and Denpasar Airfield (Den Passar Field) on Bali, and B-25bomb a freighter off Tanimbar Island located between Australia and New Guinea.

    ELLICE ISLANDS: Japanese aircraft bomb Funafuti Airfield on Funafuti Island killing two Navy Seabees and destroying a USAAF B-24 and a C-47.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 4 B-24s bomb Suribachi Airfield on Paramushiru; 2 fighters intercept and damage 1 B-24 which force-lands on Kamchatka, USSR.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 3 B-24s bomb Kowloon Docks, Hong Kong; 15 B-25s, in flights of 2 or 3 each, attack gun positions, storage areas, and village and town areas N of Chuchou, W of Nanyo, and at Chefang and Nanyo and S of Hpalen, Burma; also a bridge at Tingka is knocked out; 100+ P-40s and P-51s hit targets of opportunity throughout SE and SW China, concentrating on the Mangshih and Changsha areas.

    CHINA: From the Kweilin-Liuchow area, the Japanese begin a drive on Kweiyang, possession of which would open way to Kunming, the Hump terminus, and Chungking, the capital.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 33 P-47s hit troop and vehicle concentrations and supply areas at Manlu, Loi-Lum, Nawngmoloi, and Kyaukme; 10 P-47s support ground forces in the N Burma railroad corridor near Meza; 16 others sweep the rail line from Hsipaw to Sedaw hitting rolling stock, gun positions and other targets of opportunity while 3 bomb the Meza railroad station; 16 others strafe airfields at Nawnghkio, Anisakan, and Onbauk; 9 B-25s bomb bridges at Lashio, knocking out a bypass bridge and damaging others; several machinegun positions are silenced in the bridge area; transports continue to operate on large scale, flying 266 sorties to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): In the Bonin Islands, 15 B-24s, flying a shipping strike out of Saipan Island, attack vessels SW of Muko Jima Island and the attack harbor and town of Okimura.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force]:HQ 317th Troop Carrier Group moves from Hollandia, New Guinea to Leyte Island.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s fly heckling missions over northeastern Celebes Island.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s continue to support ground forces on Mapia Island.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Philippine Sea, a USN TBM Avenger of Composite Squadron Eight Two (VC 82) in the escort aircraft carrier USS Anzio and destroyer escort USS Lawrence C. Taylor sink Japanese submarine HIJMS I-26 about 345 nautical miles ENE of Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands, in position 12.44N, 130.42E.
    In the East China Sea, USN Submarine USS Spadefish sinks Japanese escort aircraft carrier HIJMS Shinyo about 153 nautical miles NE of Shanghai, China, in position 33.02N, 123.33E.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, a battalion of the 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, gets to within 500 yards of Limon, but the 1st Battalion is still held up by the Japanese on the slopes of Corkscrew Ridge.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Sanbon Field at Legaspi on the southeastern tip of Luzon Island; on Mindanao Island, B-24s bomb Sasa and Likanan Airfields; other B-24s and B-25s fly heckling missions over the central Philippine Islands and Mindanao Island.

    UNITED STATES: The Combined Chiefs of Staff approve the proposal of Admiral Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander South East Asia Command (SEAC), made in late October to clear the Arakan, Burma area along the northeast coast of the Bay of Bengal; reject the Kra Isthmus operation in the north central section of southwestern Thailand; and ask for a plan to develop the Cocos Islands in the Indian Ocean as a staging base.

    1945
     
  7. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 5,713

    1938
    JAPAN: The government officially repudiate the Open Door policy in its response to the U.S. note of 6 November. The Japanese declare that the Open Door is "inapplicable" to the new conditions in East Asia and to the conditions of "today and tomorrow."


    1941
    JAPAN: The Japanese Imperial Diet (legislature) secretly approves a "resolution of hostility" against the United States.
    Five mother submarines, HIJMS I-16, I-18, I-20, I-22 and I-24, each with a midget sub lashed to the deck, depart Kure Naval Base for Pearl Harbor. The submarines arrive off Oahu, Hawaiian Islands, on 6 December.


    UNITED STATES: Japanese Ambassador to the U.S. Admiral NOMURA Kichisaburo sends the following message to Tokyo: "On the evening of the 17th, both of us (NOMURA and special envoy KURUSU) went to call on a certain cabinet member and this is what he told us: "The President is very desirous of an understanding between Japan and the United States. In his latest speech he showed that he entertained no ill will towards Japan. I would call that to your attention.
    Now the great majority of the cabinet members, with two exceptions, in principle approve of a Japanese American understanding. If Japan would now do something real, such as evacuating French Indo-China, showing her peaceful intentions, the way would be open for us to furnish you with oil and it would probably lead to the re-establishment of normal trade relations. The Secretary of State cannot bring public opinion in line so long as you do not take some real and definite steps to reassure the Americans."
    NOMURA and KURUSU meet with Secretary of State Cordell Hull at 1030 hours and then sends the following in a message to Tokyo: "In our conversations of today, as a practical means of alleviating the ever worsening front with which we are faced and to quiet the fearful situation,as well as, to bring about a return to the situation existing before the application of the freezing legislation, we suggested the evacuation of Japanese troops stationed in the southern part of French Indochina. During this meeting, Hull brought up the question of the Tripartite Pact between Germany, Italy and Japan, and KURUSU said ". . . he could not say that Japan would abrogate the Tripartite Pact . . . he desires to emphasize that Japan would not be a cat's-paw for Germany, that Japan's purpose in entering into the Tripartite alliance was to use it for Japan's own purposes, that Japan entered the Tripartite Pact because Japan felt isolated."
    Doctor L. A. DuBridge of the Radiation Laboratory reported that the initial design of a 3-centimeter aircraft intercept radar was completed.


    1942
    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortresses attack Japanese warships 50 miles (80 kilometers) southwest of Gasmata, New Britain Island.

    AUSTRALIA: The 28th Bombardment Squadron, 7th BG (Heavy), begins a movement from Mareeba to the US (squadron will return to Guam in Jan 45 with B-29s).

    JAPAN: A Central Agreement between the Chief of Staffs of both the Japanese Army and Navy is issued. A scaled down order after setbacks in November, this plan calls for securing "important areas" in New Guinea to prepare for future operations. The 8th Area Army command is created including the 17th Army for Guadalcanal and the 18th Army for New Guinea.
    Previously both islands had been covered by the 17th Army. The 8th Area Army receives the 6th Division from China, the 65th Brigade and the 6th Air Division of the Japanese Army Air Force. An attack for 20 January to retake Guadalcanal is included.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Australian 16th Brigade, Maroubra
    Force, reaches Popondetta, where airfield construction is immediately begun, and continues toward Soputa without making contact with the Japanese. In the Gona area, the Australian 2/33rd Battalion, 25th Brigade, takes Jumbota and continues on towards Gona.
    The U.S. 32d Infantry Division's 126th Infantry Regiment is ordered to establish contact with the Australians. Because of supply problems, Task Force Warren remains in place.
    In Northeast New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25's bomb the airfields at Lae Aerodrome and Salamaua Airstrip while B-26's bomb and strafe the area between Cape Endaiadere and Buna.
    B-17's attack Japanese Navy ships near Buna, Gona and Cape Ward Hunt, Papua New Guinea, damaging two destroyers.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Brigadier General Edmund Sebree, Commanding General
    of the Western Sector, begins moving forces toward the line of departure west of the Matanikau River (from Point Cruz southward along the ridge containing Hills 80, 81 and 66) in preparation for a full-scale westward offensive. 2d Battalion, 182d Infantry Regiment, covered by the 8th Marine Regiment, which remains east of the Matanikau River, crosses the river about 700 yards (640 meters) from its mouth and takes Hill 66, southernmost point of the line of departure.
    Eleven USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17's and four B- 26's with eight P-38 Lightning escorts sink a Japanese merchant cargo ship off Kahili Airfield on southern Bougainville Island.

    1943
    MARSHALL ISLANDS (Seventh Air Force): 19 B-24's from Nanumea bomb Mille Atoll

    GILBERT ISLANDS: Two USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24s from the Ellice Islands bomb Tarawa Atoll.
    The USN submarine USS Nautilus enters Tarawa lagoon in the first submarine photograph reconnaissance mission. She also obtains last minute information on weather and surf conditions, landing hazards and the results of recent bombardments. At 2159 hour, mistaking her as an enemy, the USN destroyer USS Ringgold (DD-500) fired at Nautilus, sending a 5-inch shell through the conning tower damaging the main induction drain. Diving as soon as the topography permitted, the boat was rigged for depth charges and the damage control party went to work. Within two hours repairs were sufficient to allow Nautilus to continue with her primary mission.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 12 P-40's strafe troops and horses and sink a troop barge at Shihmen; 4 others, in support of Chinese forces, strafe the Tahsai ferry.

    NAURU ISLAND: Carrier-based USN carrier force (Task Group 50.4) attack the island in support of the unfolding operations to capture the Gilbert Islands. Nauru Island is a 8 square mile island in the South Pacific Ocean, located about halfway between the Gilbert and Solomon Islands. The island is rich in phosphate deposits and was occupied by the Japanese on 25 August 1942. TG 50.4 is built around the aircraft carrier USS Saratoga with Carrier Air Group Twelve, small aircraft carrier USS Princeton with Light Carrier Air Group Twenty Two and ten destroyers.

    NEW GUINEA: In the Finschhafen area, the Australians send in three more tanks to replace those blocked on the main road; they encounter numerous antitank ditches.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): Four squadrons of B-24's pound the airfields on Buka and at Kara; 3 B-25's strafe Green Island.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): In New Guinea, 30+ B-25's and B-26's hit enemy positions in the Sattelberg area; B-24's carry out a light raid on Fak Fak; and P-40's bomb Iworep.

    RAAF - Crashed is Beaufort A9-350.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: From Glen Boren, a sailor aboard the aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill: "We arrived about 100 miles off Tarawa (Atoll, Gilbert Islands) and began cleaning up all the Jap aircraft we could find. Also got a few AA sites. It looked like it was going to be a push-over. But we now know better, don't we?
    In the Celebes Sea, USN submarine USS Bluefish sinks Japanese destroyer HIJMS Sanae about 114 nautical miles south of Zamboanga, Mindanao Island in position 05.00N, 122.00E; the sub also damages an oiler

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): On Paramushiru Island, 4 B-24s strike Suribachi shore batteries, including one on Takikawa Cape. A shipping sweep by 6 B-25s is cancelled due to weather.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 10 B-25s blast stores at Hengshan and hit populated areas from Ishan to Liuchow; 130+ P-51s, P-40s, and P-38s pound targets of opportunity scattered over vast areas of S China; troops, shipping, supplies, trucks, and railroad targets are hit particularly hard N of Lingling, from Liuchow to Ishan, from Hengshan to Hengyang, from Kweilin to Liuchou, from Siangtan to Paoching, and at Chuanhsien, Hwaiyuanchen, Chingmen, Chuchiang, and Shihkiachwang.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 27 fighter-bombers support ground forces S of Pinwe and in the Bhamo area; 16 attack troops and supply area at Panglong and Nga-pwegyi while 7 hit the ferry area at Meza; 20 hit targets of opportunity along the Kanbalu-Wuntho railroad and at Maymyo and Wetwin; 9 B-25s pound Man Pwe rail yards, destroying warehouses and other buildings and causing much general damage. Transports continue large-scale operations to forward areas. In India, the detachment of the 317th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando), 2d Air Commando Group, operating from Tulihal with C-47s returns to base at Sylhet.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): B-24s from Saipan and Guam hit shipping at Chichi Jima and Haha Jima. P-38s and B-24s from Saipan escort photo planes over Iwo Jima. Project MIKE continues as USAAF B-24 Liberators lay 12 mines in effective locations in Futami Ko, Chichi Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 58th FG and the 310th and 311th Fighter Squadrons move from Noemfoor to San Roque with P-47s. 66th Troop Carrier Squadron, 433d Troop Carrier Group, moves from Nadzab to Biak with C-47s. Lost is P-61 42-5515.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF East Air Force B-24s, with P-38s and P-47s supporting, launch a major strike against oil installations at Tarakan, Dutch Borneo; other B-24s and B-25s hit shipping off Tarakan and in Brunei Bay, Brunei On Celebes Island in the Netherlands East Indies, B-24s bomb the Makassar and Kendari area and the Polewali shipyards. Other B-24s bomb airfields in the Ceram Island-Ambon Island area while P-38s strafe shipping.
    RAAF No. 22 Squadron flying (A-20C) Boston Mk. IIIs fly their first mission from Morotai
    against targets on northern Celebes Island.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s continue to support ground forces on Mapia Island off the northwest coast of New Guinea.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Philippine Sea, USN destroyer escort USS Lawrence C. Taylor and a TBM Avenger of Composite Squadron Eighty Two in the escort aircraft carrier USS Anzio, sink Japanese submarine HIJMS I-41 about 345 nautical miles ENE of Tacloban, Leyte, Philippine Islands in position 12.44N, 130.42E. This is the second submarine sunk by these units in two days.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 3d Battalion of 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, halts on a ridge 500 yards north of Limon to await the 1st Battalion, which is still battling the Japanese on Corkscrew Ridge. Positions of the 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, on Kilay Ridge are seriously threatened and under heavy fire.
    USAAF Far East Air Force B-24s, B-25s and A-20s again hit airfields and targets of opportunity on Mindanao Island. Fighter-bombers, A-20s and B-25s over several locations in the Philippine Islands attack shipping, supply and personnel areas, harbors, barges, airstrips, and communications targets.

    1945
     
  8. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1931
    MANCHURIA: Japan occupies Tsitsihar claiming it is a "purely defensive" action "aimed. at striking a decisive blow against the Ma Chan-shan army."

    UNITED STATES: Despite a ground swell of support for an economic boycott of Japan in the country, Secretary of State Henry Stimson informs the British that the U.S. would not participate in a League of Nations economic sanction against the Japanese. President Herbert Hoover's administration is not willing to go to war with Japan over Manchuria, a step which helps undermine the effectiveness of international sanctions against an aggressor state.

    1935
    CHINA: Japanese military authorities demand Chinese authorities at Peiping accept the autonomy program under threat of Japanese military occupation.


    INDIAN OCEAN: The Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney (D 48) engages in a battle with the German auxiliary cruiser HK Kormoron about 409 nautical miles NW of Perth, Western Australia, Australia, in position 26.32.34S, 111.00E. The official version is: At about 1600 hours local, the German auxiliary cruiser HK Kormoran, ship 41 also known to the British as Raider G, sights the HMAS Sydney and turns away. HMAS Sydney follows, approaches to within 1,500 yards and requests Kormoran to identify herself, which she does as the Dutch freighter SS Straat Malakka. When asked for her secret call sign Kormoran drops her camouflage, hoists the German ensign and opens fire which apparently knocks out Sydney's fire control system and forward turrets, and probably killed her captain and many others on the bridge.
    The battle lasts from approximately 1730 to 1825 hours Both ships are crippled and on fire. HMAS Sydney steams slowly south-southeast, still ablaze, and is never seen again; all 645 crewmen are lost. German survivors later say that they saw a glow on the southern horizon followed by a bright flash around 2400 hours; this could possibly be caused by the cruiser's magazines exploding.
    HK Kormoran drifts for approximately five hours before being scuttled by her crew with explosive charges; 85 crewmen are lost but 315 make it to Australia where they are held as POWs. This is a controversial subject in Australia with some believing the government is covering up the sinking. The truth and fate of HMAS Sydney will probably never be known.

    JAPAN: The Japanese Foreign Ministry sends the following message to their embassy in Washington, D.C.: "When our diplomatic relations are becoming dangerous, we will add the following at the beginning and end of our general intelligence broadcasts:
    (1) If it is Japan - U.S. relations, "HIGASHI;"
    (2) Japan-Russia relations, "KITA;"
    (3) Japan-British relations, (including Thai, Malaya and N. E. I.); "NISHI." The above will be repeated five times and included at beginning and end. Relay to Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, San Francisco."
    One submarine of the Support Group, Advance Group, Pearl Harbor Strike Force, HIJMS I-26, departs Yokosuka. On 7 December, HIJMS I-26 is underway between the Hawaiian Islands and California.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force reconnaissance aircraft over Attu and Agattu Islands sight two unidentified float monoplanes east of Buldir Island.

    PACIFIC: The 12th Fighter Squadron, 15th Fighter Group, moves from Christmas in the Line Islands to Efate in the New Hebrides with P-39s.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, forward elements of the Australian 25th Brigade, Maroubra Force, encounter the Japanese 1 mile S of Gona while the Australian 16th Brigade, Maroubra Force, makes contact with the Japanese just outside Soputa. After establishing contact with Australians near Popondetta, the 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, heads for Buna hut, since the Japanese appear to be concentrated west of the Girua River, and is directed to assist Major General George A. Vasey's Australian 7th Division instead. Major General Edwin Harding, Command General 32d Infantry Division, thus loses half his assault force; the left flank of Task Force Warren is left exposed. The 1st and 3d Battalions of the 128th Infantry Regiment, Warren Force, attack in parallel columns, the 1st Battalion from Boero and the 3d Battalion from Simemi. Both meet accurate Japanese fire from concealed positions and suffer heavy casualties; a maximum gain of 200 yards is made on right along the coast.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the 1st Battalion, 182d Infantry Regiment, crosses the Matanikau River and moves west along the shore with Company B, 8th Marine Regiment, covering the left flank; they dig in just east of Port Cruz. A gap of over 1,000 yards separates the 1st and 2d Battalions of the 182d Infantry Regiment west of the Matanikau River. During the of night 19/20 November, the Japanese move forward from Kokumbona and open fire on the 1st Battalion.

    1943
    GILBERT ISLANDS: (Seventh Air Force): 31 B-24's from Ellice bases hit Makin and Tarawa. Lost is B-24D "Raunchy" 42-72980.
    Carrier-based aircraft of USN two task groups attack Makin Island and Tarawa Atoll. Aircraft from Task Group 50.2 attack Makin; this task group is built around the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise with Carrier Air Group six and small aircraft carriers USS Belleau Wood with Light Carrier Air Group Twenty Four and USS Monterey with Light Carrier Air Group Thirty.
    Tarawa Atoll is hit by aircraft from Task Group 50.3 which drop 69 tons of bombs; this TG is built around the aircraft carriers USS Bunker Hill with Carrier Air Group Seventeen and USS Essex with Carrier Air Group Nine and the small aircraft carrier USS Independence with Carrier Air Group Twenty Two.
    USN pilots shoot down eight Japanese aircraft during the day

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, B-25's on shipping sweeps in the S China Sea strafe 2 vessels off Hong Kong, score damaging hits on 2 vessels at Kiungshan, damage a freighter off Tsao Tao , and leave a gunboat and freighter sinking E of Swatow; warehouses and wharves at Swatow also are hit.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 10 B-25's bomb the Matchin Bay area on Bougainville and Ballale Airfield.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): Nearly 30 B-25's and B 26's bomb positions in the Sattelberg area; A-20's hit the Finschhafen area. B-25's attack Kentengi Anchorage in the Bismarck Archipelago. HQ 58th Fighter Group arrives at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from the US. The 25th Liaison Squadron, Fifth Air Force, arrives at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from the US with L-5's. The 25th and 26th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadrons, 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, arrive at Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from the US with F-5's.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, the Australian 2/48th Battalion, 26th Brigade, 9th Division, encounters Japanese positions dug in on the slope of a large feature in the Finschhafen area. The Australians advance and take the positions with and then beat off a counter attack with the help of tanks.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Sculpin, heavily damaged by Japanese destroyer HIJMS Yamagumo about 154 miles north of Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, is scuttled. Captain John P. Cromwell, the embarked submarine squadron commander in Sculpin, familiar with secret details of upcoming operations, decides to go down with the ship rather than risk capture and inevitable interrogation. For his decision to accept certain death, Cromwell is awarded the Medal of Honor, posthumously.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 3 B-24s bomb Samah Bay docks on Hainan Island. In China, 10 B-25s damage 2 buildings N of Chefang and score hits on bridges at Tingka and Wan Lai-Kam, Burma; 8 P-40s and P-38s hit targets of opportunity S of Tingka and Chefang; 19 P-40s blast troops and river, rail, and road traffic in the Hankow area; 27 P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s hit numerous targets of opportunity in the Mangshih area. The 35th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Fourteenth AF, based at Chanyi, sends a flight to operate from Suichwan with F-5s.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 15 P-47s support ground forces attacking Bhamo and fighting in the Pinwe area; 36 P-47s pound enemy concentrations at Man Mao, Sekang, and Manlu. Transports fly 290 sorties to forward areas.

    BURMA: In the British Fourteenth Army's IV Corps area, the Indian 19th Division begins crossing the Chindwin River at Sittaung.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 5 B-24s from Guam on armed reconnaissance over Iwo Jima and bomb airfields on Iwo Jima while 15 hit shipping at Chichi Jima and Haha Jima Islands. 1 B-24 from Angaur Airfield bombs Legaspi Airfield.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Units moving to Leyte Island: HQ 312th BG and the 386th, 387th, 388th and 389th Bombardment Squadrons from Hollandia, New Guinea with A-20s; 2d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 22d BG (Heavy), from Owi with B-24s; 39th Troop Carrier Squadron, 317th Troop Carrier Group, from Hollandia; 403d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 43d BG (Heavy) from Owi with B-24s. Lost is B-24J 44-41258.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s hit Sidate, Mapanget, and Borebore on Celebes Island while other B-25s and A-20s hit airfields and shipping in the Ceram Island-Ambon Island-Boeroe Island area.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, elements of Task Group 78.14 land Army troops, a company of the 124th Infantry Regiment, 31st Infantry Division, U.S. Eighth Army, on Asia Island, 100 nautical miles W of Sansapor. The landing is supported by USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s and A-20s.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN destroyer escorts USS Conklin and McCoy Reynolds sink Japanese submarine HIJMS I-37 about 49 nautical mile NNW of Koror, Palau Islands, Caroline Islands in position 08.07N, 134.16E.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The 77th Infantry Division, en route to Leyte, is ordered to release a detachment of some 1,200 men, upon landing, for a projected operation against Mindoro.
    In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 1st Battalion of the 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, continues efforts to drive the Japanese from Corkscrew Ridge. The 1st Battalion of the 34th Infantry Regiment, still under heavy fire on Kilay Ridge, withdraws 100 yards N, abandoning the knoll on the south.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Alicante on the northeast of Negros Island and Palompon on Leyte Island while P-47s hit the Valencia, Mindanao Island, and Ormoc, Leyte Island areas. On Mindanao Island B-24s hit Libby Aerodrome while others bomb airfields at Sasa.
    One USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 from Angaur Island, Palau Islands, Caroline Islands, bombs Sanbon Field near Legaspi on Luzon Island.
    Carrier-based aircraft of Task Force 38 attack Japanese shipping off Luzon, in addition to airfields on that island. Navy carrier-based planes attack a convoy 10 nautical miles off San Fernando, Luzon, sinking a merchant cargo ship and damaging two escorting submarine chasers.

    UNITED STATES: Looking for ways to fund World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt announces the 6th War Loan Drive today. The Loan Drive floods the market with war bonds intended to meet Roosevelt's goals of "immediately" raising US$14 billion (US$155.35 billion in year 2005 dollars) for the war.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 184, NOVEMBER 19, 1944
    Before dawn on November 10 (West Longitude Date) ships of the Pacific Fleet bombarded installations on Iwo Jima in the Bonins. Several explosions were observed after the first salvos. Large fires ashore were started, which could be seen by ships 35 miles away. The enemy apparently was surprised, and his shore batteries replied ineffectively to our fire, causing no damage or casualties to our forces. Only one enemy plane was in the air.
    On November 14 units of the 81st Army Division reoccupied Ngeregong Island in the Palaus without resistance. The island had been occupied by an enemy force of approximately 200 men on the night of November 7 8 (reported in communiqué Number 181) which meanwhile had been heavily attacked with bombs and gunfire. Corsairs and Hellcats of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing with Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing One bombed enemy held islands in the Northern Palaus on November 14, destroyed vehicles and barges and starting fires in ammunition dumps. Fighters of the Second Marine Air¬craft Wing pounded the airfield on Yap the same day.
    Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing One attacked Haha Jima and Iwo Jima in the Bonins on November 14. On the next day Navy search Liberators hit Chichi Jima and Haha Jima. One coastal cargo ship was hit at Chichi Jima. Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on November 16 sank one medium cargo ship at Haha Jima in the Bonins and caused explosions and fires in two other cargo ships. Other Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force the same day struck at shipping in Chichi Jima, and Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing One bombed Okimura Town on Haha Jima. Results were not observed.
    From November 14 to 16 Marine units on Saipan killed 248 and captured 47 Japanese in a drive to clear the island of remnants of the enemy garrison. A number of machine guns were captured. Our losses were nine killed and 40 wounded.
    Fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing blasted airfields at Yap on November 16. Fires were started in fuel storage spaces and storage buildings In the Northern Palaus.
    Avengers and Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing hit Rota on November 17.
    Eleventh Army Air Force Liberators on November 16 bombed Suribachi in the Northern Kuriles. Meager antiaircraft fire was met.
    Fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force made strafing attacks on Pagan in the Marianas on November 15.
    The Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing continued neutralizing attacks in the Marshalls on November 16.

    1945

     
  9. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 5,868

    1937
    CHINA: After the fall of Shanghai on 9 November, the Japanese continued their advance westward and capture Soochow today. The Japanese then mount a vigorous campaign up the Yangtze River towards central China. Japanese air attacks on Chinese cities outrage world opinion.
    In light of the rapid Japanese advances in north and central China, the Nationalist Chinese government move their capital from Nanking to Chungking, although executive power is temporarily based at Hankow.


    1940
    FRENCH INDO-CHINA: Japanese warships and transports have arrived off Saigon, and the Japanese have demanded the right to occupy the city.

    1941
    JAPAN: Foreign Minister TOGO Shigenori sends a message to the Japanese ambassador in Ankara, Turkey, that includes the following: "Insofar as Japanese-American negotiations are concerned, in proceeding upon these negotiations for the adjustment of diplomatic relations on a just basis, conferences have been in progress since the 7th. However, there is great disparity between their opinions and our own. In the light of the trend of past negotiations there is considerable doubt as to whether a settlement of the negotiations will be reached. Insofar as we are concerned we have lent our maximum efforts in order to bring about a settlement of the negotiations. However, the situation not permitting any further conciliation by us, an optimistic view for the future is not permitted. In the event that negotiations are broken off, we expect that the situation in which Japan will find herself will be extremely critical. The above is for your information alone."
    All communications are cut to Etorofu Island, Kurile Islands. Tankan Bay is the assembly point for the Japanese naval vessels that will attack Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii.


    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Admiral Thomas C. Hart, commander of the Asiatic Fleet, orders the destroyer tender USS Black Hawk (AD-9) and the destroyers USS Alden (DD-211), Edsall (DD-219), John D. Edwards (DD-216) and Whipple (DD-217) dispatched to Balikpapan, Borneo, the Netherlands East Indies.

    UNITED STATES: The Japanese Ambassador to the U.S., NOMURA Kichisaburo presents the following draft proposal to U.S. Secretary of State Cordell Hull:
    "(1) Both the Governments of Japan and the United States undertake not to make any armed advancement into any of the regions in the South-eastern Asia and the Southern Pacific area excepting the part of French IndoChina where the Japanese troops are stationed at present.
    (2) The Japanese Government undertakes to withdraw its troops now stationed in French IndoChina upon either the restoration of peace between Japan and China or the establishment of an equitable peace in the Pacific area. In the meantime the Government of Japan declares that it is prepared to remove its troops now stationed in the southern part of French IndoChina to the northern part of the said territory upon the conclusion of the present arrangement which shall later be embodied in the final agreement.
    (3) The Government of Japan and the United States shall cooperate with a view to securing the acquisition of those goods and commodities which the two countries need in Netherlands East Indies.
    (4) The Governments of Japan and the United States mutually undertake to restore their commercial relations to those prevailing prior to the freezing of the assets. The Government of the United States shall supply Japan a required quantity of oil.
    (5) The Government of the United States undertakes to refrain from such measures and actions as
    will be prejudicial to the endeavors for the restoration of general peace between Japan and China."

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A USAAF Eleventh Air Force reconnaissance aircraft over Japanese-held Kiska Island draws heavy antiaircraft fire from Gertrude Cove.

    BURMA: Eight USAAF Tenth Air Force India Air Task Force (IATF) B-24's bomb the marshalling yard at Mandalay as IATF bombers intensify their campaign against Burma and Thailand.

    CANADA: Through trucks start rolling from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, toward Fairbanks, Territory of Alaska, along the 1,323 mile Alcan Military Highway, or Alaska Highway; built to supply the Pacific North West and Alaska in case of a Japanese invasion. An opening ceremony for the highway is held at Soldiers Summit, Yukon Territory, in -35F degree weather.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, advance elements of the Australian 25th Brigade, Maroubra Force, enter Gona but are driven out after nightfall. The 126th Infantry Regiment. U.S. 32d Infantry Division, upon reaching Popondetta, is sent on to Soputa to assist the Australian 16th Brigade, Maroubra Force. The Australian 16th Brigade clears the Japanese rear guard from Soputa and continues along the Sanananda track to its junction with the main trail to Cape Killerton but is halted at the Japanese forward defense line.
    Task Force Warren continues to meet heavy fire, which pins down the 3d Battalion, 128th Infantry Regiment, on the left; the 1st Battalion is halted after a 100-yard advance in the coastal area. Lieutenant Colonel Edmund Carrier's detachment (elements of the 1st Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment) and the 2/6th Independent Company, Maroubra Force, arrive at the front and prepare to join in attack along coast.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the Japanese attack the left flank of the 1st Battalion, 182d Infantry Regiment, early in the day and forces it back, but the battalion recovers lost ground with the assistance of air and artillery and drives forward until stopped by Japanese fire just west of Point Cruz. The Japanese retain Point Cruz itself. The 164th Infantry Regiment moves forward during the night of 20/21 November to bridge the gap between assault battalions of the 182d Infantry Regiment.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 2 B-25's hit warehouses and barracks on Nampang ; weather prevents completion of several other scheduled missions.

    UNITED STATES: The USAAF activates HQ XX Bomber Command at Smoky Hill AAFld, Kansas. This new command will eventually have operational and administrative control of all B-29 Superfortress units in India.

    BURMA: In the British Fourteenth Army's XV Corps area, the Indian 7th Division starts across the Mayu Range along two crude trails in preparation for an offensive.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville 45 B-25's, Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) Ventura's and P-38's attack Bonis airfield; a few other B-25's strafe coastal villages in the Empress Augusta Bay region.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Major General Ralph J. Mitchell, USMC, relieves Major General Nathan F. Twining, USA, as head of Solomons Air Command. Gen Twining later takes command of the USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy.
    On Bougainville, the 3d Marine Division is extending its positions in the vicinity of the Piva River forks against lively opposition. The 37th Infantry Division is unopposed.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): In New Guinea, 50 B-25's and B-26's pound Japanese positions in the Sattelberg area. A-20's hit the Lae area. 18 B-25s of the 345th BG escorted by four squadrons of P-47s attack the Hansa Bay area, no ships were spotted, but several barges sink or damaged and supply dump fires started. Well camoflaged AA batteries fired and damaged two B-25s, one force landed back at Port Moresby, the other B-25D 41-30522 ditched crew captured and killed. HQ 49th Fighter Group transfers from Dobodura to Gusap.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: A USN PBY-5 "Black Cat" Catalina of Patrol Squadron VP-101 sinks a cargo ship in Rabaul harbor during the night of 20/21 November. 50 B-24's bomb Gasmata.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: U.S. Army and Marine Corps troops invade Makin and Tarawa Atolls. Air and naval gunfire bombardment precede and closely support assault teams. Aerial supremacy over the Japanese has already been achieved.
    At both atolls, landing forces are beset with supply difficulties and communications failures.
    Rear Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner's Task Force 52's landing force (the 27th Infantry Division's 165th Infantry Regiment reinforced by the 3d Battalion of the 105th Infantry Regiment, tanks of the 193d Tank Battalion, and other supporting units), under Major General Ralph C. Smith, invades Makin. (The 165 Infantry Regiment is the old 69th "Fighting Irish" Regiment of the New York National Guard.) As a preliminary to the main invasion of Butaritari Island, the largest of the Makin group, a special landing detachment sails for Kotabu Island at 0645 hours and secures the island without opposition. The invasion of Butaritari is begun on schedule at 0830 hours, when Boat Landing Teams (BLTs) 1 and 3 of the 165th Infantry start landing on Red Beaches 1 and 2 on the west coast. At 1041 hours, about 10 minutes behind schedule, BLT 2 begins landing on Yellow Beaches, located on the northern (lagoon) shore between On Chong's Wharf and King's Wharf. Both assault forces secure beach heads and with tank support push rapidly forward against light resistance, converging along the West Tank Barrier, where Japanese opposition
    is overcome, although a small pocket remains to the northwest. Artillery is emplaced on Ukiangong Point.
    Rear Admiral Harry W. Hill's USN Task Force 53's landing force (2d Marine Regiment of 2d Marine Division, reinforced by the 2d Battalion of 8th Marine Regiment and supporting units), under Major General Julian C. Smith, USMC, invades Betio Island, at the southwestern tip of the atoll, where an airfield and main Japanese forces are located.
    Betio is 2 miles long and less than ½ mile wide The defenders are lead by Rear Admiral Shibasaki Keiji and 4,800 men with 50 artillery pieces and seven light tanks. The terrain ranges from sea level to 9 feet above sea level. Landings are made with great difficulty and very heavy casualties. Transports arrive south of the assigned area and at 0507 hours come under fire of previously alerted Japanese on Betio. While transports are moving northward out of range of Japanese guns, warships attempt, with some success, to neutralize Japanese positions. Aircraft deliver brief strikes before the forces land. Although H Hour is postponed from 0830 to 0900 hours, the first troops do not reach shore until 0910 hours. Marines land under direct fire, many wading from a partly exposed reef that fringes coast; upon reaching the shore, landing teams become intermingled and disorganized. Landings are made on three adjacent beaches (Red 1, 2, and 3, from west to east) on the northwest coast. The 3d Battalion, 2d Marine Regiment, the Red assault force, gains a beachhead on the northwest tip of the island but is isolated there. In the center, 2d Battalion, 2d Marine Regiment, is pinned down by Japanese fire on Red 2. The 2d Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, favored by more protracted naval gunfire preparation, meets less opposition on Red 3 and gains a beachhead extending inland to the airfield. To strengthen their precarious hold on the island, the 1st Battalion, 2d Marine Regiment, from regimental reserve, and 3d Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, from division reserve, are committed. Fortunately, Japanese counterattacks, expected after nightfall, fail to materialize, and meager gains are held. Shortly before the invasion of Betio, a scout-sniper platoon clears Japanese positions from the main pier, partly burning it in the process.
    Off Tarawa the aircraft carriers of Task Force 50 cover both landings. Beginning at about 1755 hours, 16 Betty's attack Task Group 50.3 built around the aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill and USS Essex and the small aircraft carrier USS Independence. F6F Hellcat pilots of Fighting Squadron VF-18 in USS Bunker Hill, shoot down five bombers and ship's gunners down four but one launches a torpedo that strikes the carrier's starboard quarter seriously damaging the ship; she retires for repairs.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 3 B-24s fly an air cover mission for the US Navy.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 8 B-25s hit the barracks area at Lashio, Burma; 60+ P-38s, P-40s, and P-51s on armed reconnaissance over parts of SE and SW China and French Indochina attack shipping--especially severely in the Chiuchiang, China area--and barracks, radio stations, villages, and other targets of opportunity. In China, the flight of the 21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Fourteenth AF, operating from Kanchow with F-5s, returns to base at Kunming.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 7 B-25s knock out the Hsipaw road bridge; 4 others fail to damage the Bawgyo bridge; 12 P-47s support ground forces in the Pinwe sector; 20+ others hit defenses at Mong Nge, a horse transport unit at Selan, bomb storage areas at Kyungon and Kyakataing, Japanese HQ and troop concentration at Man Mao, and several scattered targets of opportunity. Transports maintain continuous flights to forward bases and frontline areas.

    BURMA: On the Salween front, the Chinese of the XI Group Army push through Mangshih, whose airfield is soon used to land supplies.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): Bad weather cancels all bombing missions.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: Fleet oiler USS Mississinewa is sunk in the harbor of Ulithi Atoll, Admiral Halsey's Third Fleet anchorage, after being hit by a Japanese one man suicide submarine (Kaiten) while at anchor. The destruction of the Mississinewa proved to be one of the most important sinkings of the Pacific war as this was the first time the US Navy had encountered this type of submarine. Two kaitens, launched from their mother submarines HIJMS I-36 and I-47 had penetrated the safety nets across the mouth of the harbor. One ran ashore but failed to explode and is recovered by the USN. The second kaiten found its mark on the starboard side of the Mississinewa which is loaded with 440,000 U.S. gallons of aviation fuel which explodes and erupts into a blazing inferno at 0547 hours local. At about 0900 hours the ship slowly turns over and disappeares. Casualties are three officers and 47 enlisted men killed, 11 officers and 81 enlisted wounded from the ships complement of 298.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Units moving to Leyte Island: HQ Fifth AF moves from Owi; 13th Bombardment Squadron, 3d BG, from Hollandia, New Guinea to Dulag with A-20s. The 371st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 307th BG (Heavy), ceases operating form Noemfoor with B-24s and moves forward to Morotai.

    EAST INDIES: British carrier aircraft strike Sumatra, Netherlands East Indies. The targets are the airfields at Sabang and oil installations at Belawan Deli. The two carriers launch two strikes at these targets.
    In the air, USAAF Far East Air Forces (FEAF) B-25s bomb Haroekoe Drome on Haroekoe Island, an island off Ambon Island, and Laha Drome on Amon Island. On Celebes Island, P-38s hit targets of opportunity over Sidate and in the Makassar areas.
    Eight Australian Bostons and four Beaufighters attack the airfield and buildings at Tanamon Airfield on Celebes Island.

    NEW GUINEA: The U.S. Eighth Army's operations on Asia and Mapia Islands are successfully concluded. The islands are to become sites for loran and radar stations.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 1st Battalion, 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, is still held up on Corkscrew Ridge. Company C, 34th Infantry Regiment, joins the main body of the 1st Battalion on Kilay Ridge, abandoning forward positions. Company B tries unsuccessfully to recover knoll lost yesterday. The ammunition supply is critically low.
    The U.S. merchant ship SS Thomas Nelson, at anchor with twenty other ships in Dulag Bay. Leyte Island, is attacked by a Japanese suicide plane that has dived through a barrage of anti-aircraft fire to crash on her deck. On board are hundreds of tons of ammunition. The plane's single bomb explodes on impact, the explosion and fire causing the deaths of some 140 US Army enlisted men, navy gunners and merchant navy crewmen.
    USN submarine USS Gar lands supplies on the north coast of Mindoro.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 185, NOVEMBER 20, 1944
    Aircraft from a carrier task force under the tactical command of Vice Admiral J. S. McCain struck at shipping and airfields in and around Manila on November 18 (West Longitude Date). Incomplete reports show that two large cargo ships and one large oiler were burned in Manila Harbor and about 100 enemy planes were destroyed on the ground. Light fighter opposition was met over the targets and 10 Japanese aircraft were shot down. Our fighters destroyed eight additional attacking planes near our carriers.
    Fighter planes of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing hit a fuel dump and other storage areas on Babelthuap in the Palaus and sank two enemy barges in waters around this island on November 17. On the same day Catalinas of Fleet Air Wing One bombed the town on Koror in the Palaus. Fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing pounded the runways on Yap Airfield.
    On November 18 strafing and bombing attacks were made by planes of Fleet Air Wing One on barges near Kits. Iwo Jima in the Bonins. Unaggressive attacks were made on our planes by five enemy fighters.
    Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force on November 18 bombed targets in Suribachi in the Northern Kuriles. Intense antiaircraft fire was encountered.
    Second Marine Aircraft Wing fighters attacked the phosphate plant on Rota in the Marianas on November 18.
    Fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing encountered intense antiaircraft fire in bombing attacks on the power plant and other installations on Nauru on November 18. An explosion was observed near the power station.

    1945
     
    JagdtigerI likes this.
  10. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1931
    JAPAN: The government proposes the League of Nations send a commission of inquiry to Manchuria. The Japanese think it will give a clear view of the "realities" in Manchuria and China and hope the commission can be induced to approve the Japanese occupation.

    1940
    AUSTRALIA: The government presents a budget calling for increased taxation to finance a boost in defence spending.

    1941
    JAPAN: The Foreign Ministry sends the following message to the Japanese Embassy in Berlin, German: "At present, the possibility of peace between Germany and the Soviet Union seems remote. However, it may be that Germany would prefer to avoid being faced with a long term resistance by the U.S.S.R., so that she-Germany- may transfer her entire fighting forces to some other part. On the Soviet side, it seems possible that sentiment for peace may develop when she views the situation from the standpoint of reconstruction. Our relations with the United States may have considerable effect on our southward program, depending, of course, on what turns those relations take. In other words, our relationship with Great Britain and the United States has a great bearing on the future of our national greatness. For this reason, we would like to avoid the rise of any violence at this time. At the same time, we would like to break up the policy of British-U.S. -U.S.S.R. joint action. We would,
    therefore, welcome, if anything, peace between Germany and the Soviet Union. For the purpose of enhancing our position, we would not be opposed to mediating in a peace, if such a course is possible. Will you, therefore, bearing the above in mind, keep an eye on developments. "
    The four submarines of the 1st Submarine Unit, Advance Group, Pearl Harbor Strike Force, depart Kure today. Each submarine is carrying a “Glen” seaplane (Kugisho E14Y1, Navy Type 0 Small Reconnaissance Seaplane). On 7 December, these four submarines will be stationed about 70 nautical mile north of Oahu, Hawaiian Islands.


    UNITED STATES: The Navy Department sends the following message to the Commanders of the Asiatic and Pacific Fleets. "Have been informed by Dutch Legation that they have received a dispatch as follows: "According to information received by the Governor General of The Netherlands East Indies a Japanese expeditionary force has arrived in the vicinity of Palau. Should this force, strong enough to form a threat for The Netherlands Indies or Portuguese Timor, move beyond a line between the following points Davao (Philippine Islands) Waigeo (Island, Netherlands East Indies) Equator the Governor General will regard this as an act of aggression and will under those circumstances consider the hostilities opened and act accordingly. " Inform Army authorities of foregoing. Request any information you may have concerning development of this Japanese threat against the Dutch East Indies and your evaluation of foregoing information. "

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force reconnaissance is flown over Agattu and Japanese-held Kiska and Attu Islands.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, upon reaching Soputa, is attached to the Australian 16th Brigade, Maroubra Force, which continues their costly and fruitless efforts to advance toward Sanananda. The 2d Battalion, 128th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, begins a drive on Buna Mission, moving from Ango along the Dobodura-Buna track; upon reaching the trail junction, called the Triangle, where the trails to Buna Mission and Buna Village converge, they are halted by well-organized bunker positions that are made more formidable by swampy terrain on both sides of the Triangle.
    Since no further progress can be made with the forces present, the 2d Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment is ordered to cross the Girua River and assist. The attack of the Warren Force is delayed by a series of mishaps, but gets under way by 1630 hours after air and artillery preparation, which is of little benefit. Casualties are again heavy and gains negligible.
    The 3d Battalion, 128th Infantry Regiment, attempting to take the bridge between airstrips, is pinned down by Japanese fire. The Australian 2/6th Independent Company, Maroubra Force, tries to secure the eastern end of New Strip by infiltration and knocks out a few machine gun positions in the area.
    Along the coast, 1st Battalion of the 128th Infantry Regiment and Colonel Carrier's detachment of the 1st Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, attack abreast, gaining a few yards and destroying some machine gun nests. The situation improves somewhat as additional guns are brought forward and the airstrip at Dobodura becomes operational.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20's and B-25's attack the airfield, antiaircraft positions, and a bridge at Buna and hit the village of Sanananda in support of Allied ground forces.
    The Australian-U. S. force is advancing from Soputa toward Sanananda but U.S. forces driving on Buna are halted by strong bunker positions at The Triangle where trails to Buna mission and Buna village meet.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the 1st Battalion, 182d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, clears the Japanese from Point Cruz but is unable to advance any farther. To the south, the 164th Infantry Regiment attacks from the Hills 80-81 ridge line but is halted after negligible gains by the Japanese, whose defenses are skillfully organized in depth and mutually supporting. The Japanese defenders are the 700 remaining men of the 16th Regiment and the 228th and 224th Regiments, with Major General Ito Takeo, commander of the 38th Division, in command.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): The Seventh Air Force resumes operations against the Marshalls, in support of the base-development phase of Operation GALVANIC (the assault on the Gilbert ) and in preparation for invasion of the Marshall [Operation FLINTLOCK (operations against Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls) and Operation CATCHPOLE (operations against Eniwetok and Ujelang Atolls)]. B-24's from Funafuti Atoll and Nanumea bomb Nauru.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 29 P-40's strafe 100+ sampans and small boats on Tungting Lake in the Li-Chou-Changte-Ansiang area; 12 P-40's attack 5 vessels, 20 houses, and 100 men at Shihmen and between Shihmen and Li-Chou; 8 others hit troops and small river boats near Tsowshih; 12 P-40's and 4 B-25's pound the town of Tzeli; 4 other B-25's on shipping sweeps over the S China Sea damage a freighter and blast buildings at Taiping-hsu airfield. The 76th Fighter Squadron, 23d Fighter Group, transfers from Hengyang to Kweilin, China with P-40's; a detachment of the squadron is operating from Suichwan.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): In the Solomons, Brigadier General Nathan F Twining, USAAF, Commander Air Solomonss (COMAIRSOLS), is succeeded by Major General Ralph J Mitchell, USMC. A few B-25's on a shipping search strafe Kieta.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-24's bomb Gasmata. A-20's again hit the Finschhafen area; B-25's and B-24's hit shipping and other targets on Aroe and off Manokwari. HQ 58th Fighter Group transfers from Sydney, New South Wales to Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. The group's 69th and 311th Fighter Squadrons arrive at Brisbane from the US with P-47's. They will fly their first mission on 17 and 2 Feb 44 respectively. Lost on a night radar search of Wewak is B-24D 42-40886. Lost on a flight from Wards Drome to Archerfield is C-47A "Star Duster" 41-18648.

    USN - Six F4U Corsairs of VF-17 perform midmorning and noon CAP over Empress Augusta Bay, then strafe targets of opportunity along the Monoitu-Kahili Trail. Lost is F4U Corsair 17804 near Kangu Hill.

    NAURU ISLANDS: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24s from the Ellice Islands bomb Nauru Island. Nauru Island is a 8 square mile island in the South Pacific Ocean, located about halfway between the Gilbert and Solomon Islands. The island is rich in phosphate deposits and was occupied by the Japanese on 25 August 1942.

    NEI: PACIFIC OCEAN: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s and RAAF Beaufighters sink a Japanese fishing vessel off Maluku Island, Netherlands East Indies and RAAF Bostons sink a small Japanese cargo vessel off south coast of New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    NEW GUINEA: The Australian units attacking near Sattelberg, Northeast New Guinea gradually gain ground. The Japanese surprise raid at Scarlet Beach, near Lae, Papua New Guinea, is narrowly held by American and Australian defenders.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: On Makin Atoll, Boat Landing Team (BLT) 2, 165th Infantry Regiment, attacks on Butaritari Island., after air and artillery preparation, and overruns the fortified area between West and East Tank Barriers as it pushes eastward to Stone Pier. BLT 1 mops up in the western part of the island and eliminates a pocket near the West Tank Barrier. A reconnaissance detail lands on Kuma Island early in the day, reconnoiters, and withdraws.
    On Tarawa Atoll, Marines on Betio Island continue to meet grim opposition but strengthen their hold on the island with assistance of aircraft, artillery, and naval gunfire. Further reinforcements are landed, bringing the total battalions ashore to seven. Regimental Combat Team (RCT) 6 is released from V Amphibious Corps reserve to 2d Marine Division and its 1st Battalion lands on Green Beach, on the western end of the island. The rest of the 8th Marine Regiment lands on Beach Red 2. The 3d Battalion of RCT 2 secures the entire western end of Betio (Green Beach), while the 1st and 2d Battalions of RCT 2, from Red 2 and 3, push across the airfield to the south coast, splitting the Japanese forces.
    The 2d Battalion of RCT 8, on Red 3, makes little progress during the day. Meanwhile, artillery and naval gunfire are directed against the eastern end of Betio to prevent the Japanese from escaping to next island (Bairiki), and the 2d Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment lands on Bairiki after preliminary bombardment that kills the few Japanese there. While fighting is in progress on Betio, Company D of the 2d Tank Battalion starts reconnoitering other islands of Tarawa Atoll.
    On Apamama Atoll, the V Amphibious Corps Reconnaissance Company lands from the USN submarine USS Nautilus and begins reconnoitering the atoll under naval gunfire cover.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): Advance HQ Eleventh AF is established on Shemya with Brigadier General Harry A Johnson as Deputy Commander. 5 B-24s fly air coverage for naval units; another fleet coverage mission by 10 B-25s is cancelled due to weather; before clearance can be obtained from the Soviets through diplomatic channels, a B-24 air-drops provisions to a marooned crew of a B-24 which forcelanded on Kamchatka Island on 17 Nov 44.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 42 P-51s and P-38s on armed reconnaissance attack fuel supplies and the town area at Ishan and road and rail traffic and other targets of opportunity N of Wanling, Burma and in the Chiuchiang area, S of Foochow, and at Hsuchang, Sincheng, and Sheklung.

    CHINA: Major General Albert C. Wedemeyer Commanding General China Theater, U.S. Army, and Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek's Chief of Staff, formally presents his recently formulated ALPHA Plan to concentrate Chinese forces in the Kunming area as quickly as possible and place them under command of China's best general in order to avert a threat to Kunrning–to Chiang Kai-shek. General Chen Cheng is recommended for command of ALPHA forces, but Chiang Kai-shek prefers General Ho Ying-chin. American assistance will consist of maximum air support and liaison officers to advise the Chinese Army.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): 61 B-29s from Chengtu, China bomb an aircraft plant at Omura, Kyushu Island, Japan; 13 B-29s bomb Shanghai, China, and several others hit alternates and targets of opportunity; the B-29s claim 27 fighters downed, the highest Twentieth AF claim to date.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 28 P-47s support ground forces in the Pinwe and Bhamo areas; 37 others hit supply areas, troop concentrations and strongholds at Langwa, Pinmalut, Hlebwe, Mutawng, and
    Nawnghkem; 15 P-47s hit targets of opportunity while sweeping the Kyaukme-Namyao road; 10 B-25s knock out bridges at Hsipaw and Bawgyo. Transports fly 280+ sorties to forward areas.
    BURMA: USAAF Major General George Stratemeyer Commanding General AAF, India-Burma Sector, CBI Theater and commander of the Eastern Air Command, South East Asia Command, inactivates the Third Tactical Air Force so that the RAF 221 Group may provide close support for the British Fourteenth Army and the RAF 224 Group can support the British XV Corps for the Arakan offensive.
    On the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) front, the Chinese 38th Division continues to close in on Bhamo. The 114th Regiment, bypassing a Japanese outpost at Subbawng, which detachment of 113th Regiment is containing, drives into Shwekyina.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): Seventh AF service groups are reassigned from the VII Air Service Area Command to the VII Bomber Command and VII Fighter Command, with one service group to support each tactical group in the field. B-24s from Guam bomb shipping and naval shore installations at Chichi Jima and Haha Jima. 5 B-24s from Guam on armed reconnaissance bomb airfields on Iwo Jima

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s hit Langoan and Mapanget Airfields on Celebes Island while B-24s in the Kendari area bomb Ambesia Airfield. B-24s sink a Japanese ship in Makassar Strait off Dutch Borneo.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The USN submarine USS Sealion is on patrol north of Formosa. At 0220 hours, radar contact is made with two Japanese battleships, HIJMS Kongo and Haruna, two cruiser and three destoryers. By 0257 hours, the submarine is in position and fires six torpedoes at Haruna but they miss and three hit the destroyer HIJMS Urakaze. After a series of explosions, Urakaze simply blows apart and in less than two minutes, the vessel sinks taking her entire crew of 14 officers and 293 men with her. At 0259 hours, Sealion fires three additional torpedoes and one strikes the battleship HIJMS Kongo. Kongo had been badly damaged by air attacks on 25 October during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. A gash on her starboard side opened up 15 oil tanks, the contents of which poured into the sea. The damage forced the Kongo to attempt a return voyage to Japan for repairs. The torpedo hit causes Kongo to list 20 degrees. Heading for the nearest port on northern Formosa, the list increases to 45 degrees. It becomes obvious that the Kongo is sinking and the order is given to abandon ship. When the list accelerates past 60 degrees, tragedy strikes. At 0525 hours local, her forward 14-inch magazine explodes with horrifying results and the Kongo rolls over and slips beneath the waves about 67 nautical miles north of Taipei, Formosa, in position 26.07N, 121.36E. Some 1,250 officers and men are lost. Two of her escorts, the destroyers HIJMS Hamakaze and Isokaze rescue survivors, Hamakaze picking up seven officers and 139 men and Isokaze rescued six officers and 85 men, a total of 347 survivors.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 128th Infantry Regiment, less 1st Battalion, which is to contain the Corkscrew Ridge, is ordered to capture Limon and secure a crossing of the Leyte River tributary to the south. In preparation for this attack, fire is placed on Japanese positions along Highway 2 during the night. The action on Kilay Ridge is confined to patrolling and fire exchanges. Supplies brought by hand from Consuegra are being supplemented by airdrops. In the XXIV Corps area, the 3d Battalion of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, moves from Baybay to position just south of the 2d Battalion. Artillery is being emplaced at Damulaan.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Matina and Lumbia Aerodromes on Mindanao Island. On Leyte Island, fighter-bombers hit troop barges and supply dumps in Ormoc Bay and numerous targets of opportunity throughout the central Philippine Islands.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 186, NOVEMBER 21, 1944
    Army and Marine Infantry units in the Marianas and Palaus continued to clear captured islands of remnants of Japanese garrisons. Total enemy casualties given below are through November 13 (West Longitude Date)
    Saipan, killed, 26,277; captured, 2,068
    Guam, killed, 17,238; captured, 463
    Tinian, killed, 6,893; captured, 316
    Angaur and Peleliu, killed, 12,980; captured, 420
    On November 18, aircraft of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing made a strafing attack on installations on Haha Jima and shipping at Chichi Jima.
    Additional reports on aircraft strikes by carrier based planes over Manila on November 18 now show that a total of 26 Japanese planes were shot out of the air. Four of these were destroyed by ships' antiaircraft fire. (A total of 18 planes had been reported shot down in communiqué No. 185. )
    Japanese bases in the Palaus were hit by planes of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing and Fleet Air Wing One on November 18. Several large fires were started. On the same day fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing carried out bombing attacks on the airfield at Yap.
    Air attacks were made on enemy held bases in the Marshalls on November 19 and 20 as the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and search planes of Meet. Air Wing Two continued neutralizing raids on those islands. The enemy sent up meager antiaircraft fire.

    1945

     
  11. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1935
    UNITED STATES: Pan American Airways commences the first trans-Pacific airmail service, flying the Martin M.130 "China Clipper" from Alameda, California, to Manila, Philippine Islands, via Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii; Midway Island; Wake Island; and Guam. About 125,000 people witness the take-off from Alameda. The clipper arrives in Manila on 29 November carrying 110,000 letters and arrives back in Alameda on 6 December carrying 98,000 letters.


    1941
    JAPAN: The Foreign Ministry sends a message to Ambassadors NOMURA Kichisaburo and special envoy KURUSU Saburo in Washington, D.C.; the message contains the following statement: "There are reasons beyond your ability to guess why we wanted to settle Japanese-American relations by the 25th, but if within the next three or four days you can finish your conversations with the Americans."
    The Japanese First Air Fleet arrives in Hitokappu Bay, Etorofu Island, Kurile Islands. This fleet consists of six aircraft carriers (HIJMS Akagi, Hiryu, Kaga, Shokaku, Soryu and Zuikaku), two battleships (HIJMS Hiei and Kirishima), two heavy cruisers (HIJMS Chikuma and Tone), a light cruiser (HIJMS Abukuma) and ten destroyers. This is the force that will attack Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii.

    UNITED STATES: Secretary of State Cordell Hull tells Japanese representatives Ambassadors NOMURA Kichisaburo and special envoy KURUSU Saburo that there might be a relaxation of economic pressures. Secretary of State Hall "said that he had called in the representatives of certain other governments concerned in the Pacific area and that there had been a discussion of the question of whether things (meaning Japanese peaceful pledges, et cetera) could be developed in such a way . . . these representatives were interested in the suggestion and there was a general feeling that the matter could all be settled if the Japanese could give us some satisfactory evidences that their intentions were peaceful."


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A USAAF Eleventh Air Force B-24 flies reconnaissance over Agattu and Japanese-held Kiska and Attu Islands; bombers and fighters are alerted for a mission tomorrow to find and destroy a reported five vessel convoy.

    BURMA: Six B-24's of the USAAF Tenth Air Force's India Air Task Force inflict heavy damage on the railroad center at Mandalay.

    INDOCHINA: USAAF 14th Air Force aircraft on a shipping strike sink a Vichy French ship east of Haiphong harbor, French Indochina.

    NEW GUINEA: The Australian 25th Brigade, Maroubra Force, continues toward Gona, Papua New Guinea; two battalions move in to attack and are forced to withdraw with heavy casualties. The U.S. 126th Infantry Regiment (-) attacks through the Australian 16th Brigade, Maroubra Force, toward Sanananda; the 16th Brigade will not attempt any forward moves until the Americans have secured the Soputa-Sanananda- Killerton Track junction. Major Richard Boerem's detachment, elements of the 1st Battalion moves along the road as the 3d Battalion advances on the flanks along secondary trails. After nightfall, fresh Japanese forces attack Company L, flanking on the right, to insure safety of food supply dump in line of advance and are driven off. From Soputa, the 2d Battalion of 126th Infantry Regiment moves forward to assist the 2d Battalion of 128th, crossing to the east bank of the Girua River on rafts during the evening.
    On the Warren Force front, the 3d Battalion of 128th Infantry Regiment secretly pulls back to positions just behind the 1st Battalion, though Company I holds former position astride trail just west of New Strip.

    PAPUA NG: USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20's attack trails around Sanananda while B-26's hit the Buna area; B-17's and B-25's bomb the airfield at Lae and barges between Lae and Salamaua.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The attempt to build an airfield at Aola Bay on Guadalcanal is ended. The units involved in Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner's brainchild are shifted to Koli Point, east of Lunga, where they will successfully complete an airfield.
    On Guadalcanal, the 182d and 164th Infantry Regiments again meet strong resistance while attempting to push west and are unable to advance. The 8th Marine Regiment prepares to attack through the 164th Infantry.

    NEW BRITAIN: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17's and B-25's attack warships 68 nautical miles SW of Arawe, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago and elsewhere in the Solomon Sea.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 11 B-24's from Canton bomb Mille Atoll. The B-24's claim 2 interceptors shot down.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): Twelve USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-40s strafe river traffic from Hofuh to Changte, and 16 attack numerous small troop boats on Tungting Lake, west of Changteh.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): P-40's in a battle with 30-40 fighters over Empress Augusta Bay, claim 5 fighters shot down; P-38's strafe barges and shore targets at Chabai. 20+ B-25's, along with 5 RNZAF Ventura's, 8 P-38' and 8 USN F4U's, attack the airfield on Buka scoring hits on the airstrip and taxiways.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 22 B-25's and A-20's attack villages around Sattelberg. 100+ B-25's and B-24's bomb Gasmata and Cape Gloucester. Lost are B-24D 42-41075 and B-25G 42-64846. B-24's on armed reconnaissance score hits on freighter near Kavieng and a tanker and barge in the Bismarck Sea. The 17th Reconnaissance Squadron (Bombardment) and 82d Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter), 71st Reconnaissance Group, transfer from Milne Bay to Dobodura with B-25's and P-39's respectfully. They will fly their first mission on 28 Jan 44 and 27 Nov 43 respectively. The 418th Night Fighter Squadron, V Fighter Command, transfers from Milne Bay to Dobodura with P-38's and P-70's.

    MARSHALL ISLANDS: Eleven USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24s from the Phoenix Islands bomb Mili Atoll. The B-24 gunners claim two interceptors shot down.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, the Australian 9th Division continues to struggle for Sattelberg, the 26th Brigade reaching the southern slopes. The Japanese attack the Australian 2/43rd Battalion, 24th Brigade, 9th Division, north of Scarlet Beach and are wiped out.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN destroyer USS Frazier is damaged when she intentionally rams Japanese submarine HIJMS I-35. Frazier and destroyer USS Meade depth charge the sub forcing her to the surface and then engage her with gunfire. Finally, Frazier rams the sub sinking her about 10 nautical miles west of Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, in position 01.22N, 172.47E.
    USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24 Liberators on armed reconnaissance sink a Japanese cargo ship about 129 nautical miles NW of Kavieng, New Ireland Island, Bismarck Archipelago, in position 01.00S, 149.20E.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: After a preparatory bombardment on Makin Atoll, Boat Landing Team 3 of the 165th Infantry Regiment takes over the attack from Boat Landing Team 2 and drives east on Butaritari Island well beyond the East Tank Barrier, which the Japanese have abandoned. Though the eastern tip of the island remains to be explored, Admiral Richmond K. Turner, commander of the Amphibious Force Pacific Fleet, declares the island captured. Major Gen Ralph Smith, Commanding General 27th Infantry Division, assumes command ashore.
    During the night of 22/23 November, the Japanese are virtually wiped out when they make an unsuccessful counterattack. Steps are taken to cut off the Japanese escape from Butaritari: elements of Company A, Boat Landing Team 1, make a waterborne move to the narrow neck of the island to intercept the Japanese; a special detail moves to Kuma Island to halt the Japanese withdrawal there.
    The Japanese on Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, undergo heavy air, naval, and artillery bombardment as the battle for the island continues. The Japanese are brought under cross fire as artillery is emplaced on Bairiki Island. Passing through the 3rd Battalion of the 2d Marine Regiment, the 1st Battalion of the 6th Marine Regiment drives east along the south coast on a narrow front, making contact with the 2d Marine Regiment force and continuing advance to the eastern end of the airfield. The 2d Battalion of the 8th Marine Regiment, with elements of the 3d Battalion attached, presses east along the northern coast to the eastern end of the airfield. The 1st Battalion of the 8th Marine Regiment, attached to the 2d Marine Regiment, attacks a strongpoint between Red Beaches 2 and 1 and succeeds in containing it.
    Thus by the end of the day the Japanese are compressed into the eastern part of Betio beyond the airfield and retains a pocket between Red Beaches 1 and 2. The 3d Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, lands on Green Beach and moves forward along the south coast behind the 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. Major General Julian C. Smith, USMC, establishes a command post ashore.
    During the night of 22/23 November, Japanese counterattacks are repelled by the 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment.
    During the afternoon on Abemama Island, the 78 man scouting party, composed of the V Amphibious Corps Reconnaissance Company and an Australian scout call on the USN submarine USS Nautilus for gunfire support against the minute, 25-man, but game Japanese garrison .
    Rather than sacrifice marines in bringing the Japanese out of their bunkers, naval gunfire is requested. The gunfire proves accurate, killing 14; the remainder commit suicide. Thus, by the time the main assault force arrived on the 26 November, Abemama had been secured and preparations to turn it into an air base for the Marshalls campaign had begun.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 4 B-25s abort an air coverage mission due to weather.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 22 B-24s bomb Hankow; 11 B-25s pound the Ishan and Liuchenghsien areas while 8 hit storage facilities at Wanling and Kutkai, Burma; 95 P-51s, P-40s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance over wide expanses of S China attack town areas, supplies, and road and rail traffic, hitting the Chefang area especially hard.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 15 P-47s support ground forces at Bhamo while 37 others fly close support in the Pinwe area; supply and personnel areas at Nawngchio, Kutkai, Ingon, Selong, Man Mao, and in the vicinity of Kanbalu are pounded by more than 40 P-47s; 12 others attack the airfield at Kawlin Transports fly 188 sorties to forward areas. In India, the 2d Combat Cargo Squadron, 1st Combat Cargo Group, moves from Sylhet to Imphal with C-47s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 22 B-24s from Saipan escorted by 22 P-38s (the first long-range P-38 escort of Seventh AF bombers), bomb airfields on Moen and Param. P-47s from Saipan pound the airfield on Pagan.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: Aircraft from a USN Task Group 38.4 bomb Japanese air facilities on Yap using napalm, the first time this weapon had been used by carrier-based aircraft.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Fighter-bombers hit targets of opportunity in the Makassar area, loosing the P-38 piloted by Robert Westbrook.

    EAST INDIES: On Celebes Island in the Netherlands East Indies, fighter-bombers hit targets of opportunity in the Makassar area while B-24s bomb the nickel mine and targets of opportunity in the Kendari area and hit airfields in northeastern Celebes. Other B-24s hit small shipping during a sweep over Brunei Bay, British Brunei, Borneo.
    Nine Japanese aircraft raid Pitu and Wama Airfields on Morotai Island, Netherlands East Indies, destroying 15 RAAF and USAAF aircraft on the ground and damaging 29.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The British submarine HMS/M Stratagem (P 234) is sunk by a Japanese patrol craft approximately 3 nautical miles SW of Malacca, Malaya, in the shallow Strait of Malacca. The bow strikes the bottom and the sub begins flooding. Unable to shut the watertight doors, the crew scuttles the boat. Ten men escape from the stricken boat, though only eight manage to make it to the surface alive and are taken prisoner by the Japanese. Three of the eight are taken to Japan and survived the war; the fate of the other five is unknown.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 2d and 3d Battalions of the 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, attack south astride Highway 2 and take Limon, virtually completing the battle of Breakneck Ridge. Bypassed Japanese pockets are eliminated by mid-December. Forward elements of the 128th Infantry Regiment cross the tributary of the Leyte River south of Limon. The 1st Battalion of the 34th Infantry Regiment, under heavy Japanese attack on Kilay Ridge, is forced to compress its defense perimeter to avoid encirclement. In the XXIV Corps area, the 7th Infantry Division is ordered to assemble in the Baybay area as quickly as possible. The 11th Airborne Division, although not originally intended to operate on Leyte, is ordered to relieve the 7th Infantry Division, less the 17th Infantry Regiment, so the 7th can clear the eastern shore of Ormoc Bay.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers pound Bacalod Airstrip and Ipil on Negros Island, and Ormoc, Leyte Island area bridges, barges, and targets of opportunity. B-24s also bomb Sasa Airfield on Mindanao Island.

    UNITED KINGDOM: The USAAF Eighth Air Force's 2d and 4th Combat Bombardment Wings (Heavy) of the 3d Bombardment Division are combined to form the Administrative Bombardment Wing (Provisional) ; this type of unit is expected to be highly suitable for conditions in the Pacific theater where bomb division HQ might be located far from its wing HQ; under this new plan, the administrative wing can absorb many functions of the division HQ; this experiment will be judged acceptable during February 1945.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 187, NOVEMBER 22, 1944
    Further reports of the air strikes in and around Manila on November 18 (West Longitude Date) reveal the following total damage to shipping and Installations by planes of the Third Fleet:
    One medium cargo ship and one small coastal cargo ship set afire in Subic Bay.
    Two medium cargo ships burning and one small coastal cargo ship sunk near San Fernando.
    One cargo ship burned and another burning in Manila Bay.
    An oiler in flames and one medium cargo ship and two other oilers hit in Manila Bay.
    Five luggers burning off Batangas and another sunk at Laoag.
    Locomotive destroyed at Lucena.
    Our planes strafed a heavy cruiser which appeared to be beached or in shallow water near Santa Cruz.
    Ten fires were started in fuel dumps at San Fernando, Del Carmen Field and Clark Field while buildings and other installations were destroyed at West Lipa, Nichols, Malvar and Del Carmen Fields.
    Liberators and Lightnings of the Seventh Army Air Force on November 21 strafed and bombed airfields on Truk. Five enemy fighters were seen of which four were destroyed.
    Fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing on November 19 hit Babelthuap in the Palaus, setting fuel dumps afire, and pounded the airfield on Yap.
    Defenses on Rota in the Marianas were pounded by fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing on November 19.

    1945
     
  12. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1941
    JAPAN: Carrier Striking Task Force Operations Order No. 1 is issued stating that the "The Carrier Striking Task Force will proceed to the Hawaiian Area with utmost secrecy and, at the outbreak of the war, will launch a resolute surprise attack on and deal a fatal blow to the enemy fleet in the Hawaiian Area. The initial air attack is scheduled at 0330 hours, X Day. Upon completion of the air attacks, the Task Force will immediately withdraw and return to Japan and, after taking on new supplies, take its position for Second Period Operations. In the event that, during this operation, an enemy fleet attempts to intercept our force or a powerful enemy force is encountered and there is danger of attack, the Task Force will launch a counterattack. The second unit, the Midway Bombardment Unit (the 7th Destroyer Division less the 2nd section), will depart from Tokyo Bay around X-6 Day and, after refueling, secretly approach Midway. It will arrive on the night of X Day and shell the air base. The unit will then withdraw and, after refueling, return to the western part of the Inland Sea. The oiler Shiriya will accompany the bombardment unit on this mission and will be responsible for the refueling operation."

    MARSHALL ISLANDS: Nine Japanese submarines of the 3rd Submarine Unit, Advance Group, Pearl Harbor Strike Force, depart Kwajalein Atoll today and arrive off the Hawaiian Islands on 6 December. One of the submarine, HIJMS I-8, is carrying a "Glen" seaplane (Kugisho E14Y1, Navy Type 0 Small Reconnaissance Seaplane); on 7 December HIJMS I-8 will be stationed about 45 nautical miles SW of Oahu Island, seven of the boats will be stationed about 25 nautical miles S of Oahu and one boat will be stationed 100 nautical miles W of Oahu.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force aircraft fly a reconnaissance mission over Japanese-held Kiska and Attu Islands and Agattu, and Amchitka Islands.

    AUSTRALIA: Japanese bombers attack targets in the Northern Territory. At around midnight on the night of 22/23 November, a formation of high-flying bombers attack RAAF Coomalie Creek Airfield. All the bombs fall in the scrub and do no damage to the airfield. At least two Japanese bombers are shot down. Between 0300 and 0439 hours, the bombers attack the Darwin town area and RAAF Darwin.

    CHINA: Six B-25's and 17 P-40s of the USAAF Tenth Air Force's China Air Task Force attack Tien Ho Airfield at Canton claiming 40+ aircraft destroyed on the field. These strikes follow three weeks of missions in support of Chinese forces along the Siang-Chiang River.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Nine B-25's and seven P-40s of the USAAF Tenth Air Force’s China Air Task Force feint at Hong Kong, then fly to the Gulf of Tonkin and sink a freighter and damage two others near Haiphong.

    INDIAN OCEAN: In the Arabian Sea, the 10,006 ton British India SN Company passenger/cargo liner SS Tilawa is torpedoed and sunk by Japanese submarine HIJMS I-29 about 809 nautical miles NNE of the Seychelles Islands in position 07.36N, 61.08E.
    The ship is en route from Bombay, India, to Mombassa, Kenya, and Durban, South Africa, with 6,472 tons of cargo. The explosion creates great panic among the native passengers who rush the lifeboats.
    The ship is carrying 222 crewmen, four gunners and 732 passengers. Of the 958 people on board, 252 passengers and 28 crew are lost. The British light cruiser HMS Birmingham rescues 678 survivors.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the main body of the Australian 25th Brigade, 7th Division, arrives at the front and begins an assault on Gona against determined resistance. The 3d Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, continues toward Sanananda; Company L, on the right, is pinned down by fire at edge of food dump. The airfield atPopondetta becomes operational, and four guns are flown in and emplaced just south of Soputa. The 2d Battalions of the 126th and 128th Regiments are combined to form the Urbana Force under command of the commanding officer, 128th Infantry Regiment. The 2d Battalion of the 128th Infantry Regiment is slowed by extremely difficult terrain as it advances against the Triangle along the main track and swamps on either side of it.
    After ineffective preparatory fire against Japanese bunkers, the 1st Battalion of the 128th Infantry Regiment and the detachment of the1st Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, attack along the coast toward Cape Endaiadere, gaining some 300 yards against intense fire.
    The Australian 2/16th Independent Company makes limited progress toward the eastern end of New Strip.
    In Papua New Guinea, Fifth Air Force A-20's and B-26's bomb Sanananda Point as Australian forces begin their assault on Gona and U.S. forces approach Sanananda.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The frontline companies, west of the Matanikau River on Guadalcanal, withdraw about 300 yards this morning. Three battalions of artillery pound the Japanese lines for 30 minute and then the 8th Marine Regiment passes through the 164th Infantry Regiment to continue the attack westward but is unable to advance.
    Since the offensive has proved too costly to be continued for the time being, the attack is halted along Hills 66-80-81-Point Cruz line to await reinforcements. This halt will result in a stalemate for the next six weeks. The Cactus Air Force also provides support and wounds Lieutenant General Seikichi Hyakutake, commander of the 17th Army, and his Chief of Staff.
    Japanese mortar fire wounds Lieutenant Colonel Hall of the 3rd Battalion, 164th Infantry Regiment.
    Six Cactus Air Force SBDs attack the Munda area on New Georgia Island.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 6 B-24's from Nukufetau in the Ellice bomb Emidj and Jabor , Jaluit Atoll, in the Marshall .

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 13 B-25's, 24 P-40's, and 7 P-51's pound the Yoyang railroad yards and warehouse area; 8 other P-40's, on armed reconnaissance over the Hanshow area, strafe barges, boats, supplies, and cavalry forces.

    BURMA: In northern Burma, the Japanese overrun the command post of the 112th Regiment, Chinese 38th Infantry Division.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): Major General Hubert R Harmon, USAAF, assumes duties as Deputy Commander for Air in the South Pacific Area (SOPAC). Colonel Earl W. Barnes assumes command of the XIII Fighter Command.
    On Bougainville Island, Chabai is attacked by 23 B-25's of the 42nd BG (12 from 75th BS and 4 from 70th BS) dropping parafrag bombs and strafing, meeting intense anti-aircraft fire that damaged three planes. Lost is B-25C 42-32255. Also participating are 6 RNZAF Venturas, and 24 USN F4U's; 2 B-24's bomb the same targets later in the day; 19 B-24's hit Bonis Airfield and Buka Airfield; 4 B-25's on a shipping sweep bomb and strafe villages along the coast between Mabiri and Luluai.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-25's and A-20's hit villages around Finschhafen. Two new units arrive at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia from the US: 1. The 20th Combat Mapping Squadron, 4th Photographic Group (Reconnaissance), with F-7's. They will fly their first mission on 5 Apr 44. 2. The 310th Fighter Squadron, 58th FG, arrives with P-47's. They will fly their first mission on 24 Feb 44.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s attack a convoy near Halmahera Island in the Moluccas Islands and sink one vessel. B-24's attack a convoy near Halmahera in the Moluccas and sink 1 vessel.

    MARSHALL ISLANDS: Six USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators based in the Ellice Islands bomb Emidj and Jabor Islands, Jaluit Atoll.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, the Japanese counterattack on the Australian 24th Brigade, 9th Division, is stopped. The 26th Brigade continues advancing on Sattelberg, with bulldozers clearing the way for tanks.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the 3d Marine Division, still strongly opposed in the Piva forks area, begins regrouping. The 1st Marine Parachute Battalion arrives.
    USN Task Force 39, consisting of four light cruisers and eight destroyers, bombards the Buka Island-Bonis area of northern Bougainville.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: In Makin Atoll, organized resistance on Butaritari Island ends at 1030 hours when advance elements of 3d Battalion, 165th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division, reach the tip of the island. Re-embarkation of the assault forces begins. U.S. casualties are 66 killed and 152 wounded; the Japanese lose 395 men.
    In Tarawa Atoll, the 3d Battalion of the 6th Marine Regiment, attacking through the 1st Battalion, reaches the end of Betio Island shortly after 1300 hours, and Major General Julian C. Smith, Commanding General 2d Marine Division, reports the end of organized resistance on Betio at 1330 hours. The 8th Marine Regiment, less the 1st Battalion, moves to Bairiki Island. The 2d Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, moves from Bairiki to Betio and is given the task of securing the rest of islands in Tarawa Atoll. The 3d Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, moves to the village of Eita Island, where the 3d Platoon of Company D, 2d Tank Battalion, is attached to it. U.S. casualties are 961 killed, 2,296 wounded and 27 missing; of the original 4,836 Japanese on the island, all but 17 wounded POWs and 129 Korean laborers are killed.
    USN F6F-3 Hellcat fighter pilots of Fighting Squadron Sixteen in the aircraft carrier USS Lexington shoot down 17 Japanese Zero near Makin Atoll at about 1005 hours.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 B-25s bomb a storage area near Lashio and 8 hit Kutkai and Wanling. 2 B-24s bomb Kowloon Docks in Hong Kong. 120+ P-40s, P-51s and P-38s hit targets of opportunity throughout SW and SE China; 32 of the fighter-bombers support ground forces in the Chefang, China area.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 50+ P-47s support ground forces in the Pinwe and Bhamo areas; 16 sweep and strafe airfields and many targets of opportunity from Anisakan to Nawnghkio; 3 hit an ammunition dump at Man Naung; 21 P-47s sweep roads in the Ye-U area and strafe rail installations at Kanbalu; 10 B-25s knock out the Tantabin main bridge and Tangon and Thegyaung bypass bridges, and blast approaches to the Tangon main bridge and Tantabin bypass bridge. 282 transport sorties are flown to forward bases and frontline areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 17 B-24s from Guam Island hit shipping at Chichi Jima and Haha Jima Islands and bomb the town of Okimura in the Bonin Islands.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: The RAAF's No. 6 Squadron resumes their attack on Rabaul, New Britain Island, with Beauforts. The town will be attacked three more times before the end of the month.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The 63d and 64th Bombardment Squadrons (Heavy), 43d BG (Heavy), move from Owi to Tacloban, Leyte Island with B-24s.

    EAST INDIES: Eleven RAAF (P-40) Kittyhawks dive bomb Lolobato and Hatetabako Aerodromes on Halmahera Island and 12 others dive bomb Galela Airfield on Galela Island 20 miles from Morotai Island.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 128th Infantry Regiment of the 32d Infantry Division improves and consolidates positions south of Limon and for the next few days patrols actively. The 112th Cavalry Regiment, which has been patrolling the Mt. Minoro area, is ordered southwest toward Highway 2 to relieve pressure on the 32d Infantry Division. In the XXIV Corps area, the 77th Infantry Division begins unloading on Leyte and is assigned to the corps. The Battle of Shoestring Ridge opens as the Japanese attack the sector of thinly spread 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, along the Palanas River, forcing a limited withdrawal.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Matina Aerodrome on Mindanao Island.
    The USN submarine USS Gar lands men and supplies on west coast of Luzon.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Australian troops of the 9th Battalion, 7th Brigade, 3rd Division, relieve the U.S. 2d Battalion, 132d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, at Cape Torokina, Bougainville. The Australian arrival opens the campaign on Bougainville that cost over 500 Australian lives by the war's end.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 188, NOVEMBER 23, 1944
    Matsuwa in Kuriles was bombarded by a Naval task force on November 21 (West Longitude Date). Large fires and explosions were observed. Enemy guns did not reply. None of our ships was damaged.
    Fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing destroyed an ammunition dump and set fire to trucks and a barge at Babelthuap in the Northern Palau Islands on November 20. One of our planes was lost, but the pilot was rescued.
    Fighters of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing bombed the airstrip on Yap on November 20.
    Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed and strafed shipping and harbor installations at Chichi Jima and Haha Jima in the Bonin Islands on November 20. One enemy plane was seen over Chichi Jima. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.
    Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and strafed the barracks area and power plant on Wake Island on November 22. A large explosion was observed north of the power plant. Antiaircraft fire was meager and In¬accurate.
    Search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing continued neutralization raids in the Marshall Islands on November 21 and 22.

    1945
     
  13. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1931
    JAPAN: The Government assures the U.S. Government that there is nothing in the report of Japanese advance on Chinchow stating, "The Foreign Secretary, the Secretary of War, and the Chief of Staff are all of them agreed there should be no hostile operations toward Chinchow and that military orders to that effect had been issued."

    1935
    CHINA: The Chinese administrator of the eastern section of the demilitarized zone in Hopei, Yin Ju-keng, declares the independence of the district for administration under the East Hopei Anti-Communist Autonomous Council with Japanese military support to get direct Japanese control over the coal-producing, area together with its connections with the sea.


    1939
    CHINA: The Japanese claim to have occupied the strategically important city of Nanning in the Kwangsi province, despite fierce resistance by 100,000 Chinese Nationalist troops. The capture of Nanning is Japan's first major victory since its forces advanced west into Kwangsi province in a bid to deprive the Chinese of their last remaining links with French Indochina. The Japanese claim that they now control the road which hitherto had been the route for 70 percent of China's supplies from Indochina.


    1941
    UNITED STATES: Admiral Harold R. Stark, the USN Chief of Naval Operations, sends the following message to Admiral Thomas C. Hart, Commander-in-Chief Asiatic Fleet in the Philippine Islands; Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, Commander-in-Chief Pacific Fleet in the Territory of Hawaii; Rear Admiral Charles A. Blakely, commander of the Eleventh Naval District at San Diego, California; Vice Admiral John W. Greenslade, commander of the Twelfth Naval District at San Francisco, California; Vice Admiral Charles S. Freeman, commander of the Thirteeth Naval District at Seattle, Washington; and Rear Admiral Frank H. Sadler, commander of the Fifteenth Naval District in the Canal Zone: "Chances of favorable outcome of negotiations with Japan very doubtful. This situation coupled with statements of Japanese Government and movements their naval and military forces indicate in our opinion that a surprise aggressive movement in any direction including attack on Philippines or Guam is a possibility.
    Chief of Staff (of the U.S. Army, General George C. Marshall) has seen this dispatch concurs and requests action addresses to inform senior Army officers their areas. Utmost secrecy necessary in order not to complicate an already tense situation or precipitate Japanese action. Guam will be informed separately."


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: An Eleventh Air Force B-24 flies reconnaissance over Japanese held Kiska Island but weather precludes the westward continuation of reconnaissance. A scheduled mission of eight B-24s and four B-26's to Kiska Island is called off due to icing conditions.

    BURMA: Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell, Commander in Chief US China-Burma-India Theater of Operations, Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, and Commander in Chief Northern Area Combat Command (NCAC) is informed by the U.S. War Department that little more aid, aside from existing commitments, can be provided for the northern Burma offensive.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Japanese continue to repel efforts of the Australian 25th Brigade, 7th Division, to take Gona. The 3d Battalion of the 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, pushes on toward Sanananda: Two Australian companies join Company L in a battle for the food dump on the right; on the left, Companies I and K reach a clearing west of Killerton trail, some 1,200 yards N of the original starting point, but are driven back into a swamp by Japanese infiltrators.
    The Urbana Force launches a co-ordinated assault on the Triangle at 1428 hours after ineffective air and a brief mortar preparation. While Company F of the 126th Infantry Regiment makes a frontal assault in which Company H of the 128th Infantry Regiment joins, Company E of the 126th Infantry Regiment takes over the left flank positions along the Entrance Creek and Companies E and G of the 128th Infantry Regiment attack on the right flank.
    The attack, although carefully planned, is a failure. The Warren Force front along coast is quiet.
    In Papua New Guinea, Fifth Air Force A-20s, B-25s, B-26s, B-17s, P-40s, and P-39 and P-400s Airacobras, hit Sanananda Point, the Buna area, the Sanananda-Soputa trail south of Sanananda, and the area between Cape Killerton and Sanananda Point as Allied forces launch a ground assault on The Triangle; the attack is repelled by fierce resistance.
    USAAF B-17s and B-25s and RAAF Beaufighters sink Japanese destroyer HIJMS Hayashio in Huon Gulf between Lae and Finschafen and damage torpedo boats Otori and Hiyodori east of Lae.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Search aircraft over the Buin, Bougainville Island area report a large number of destroyers and cargo vessels in the harbor. By this date elements of the Americal Division have pushed along the N coast of Guadalcanal Island to a position S of Point Cruz where they wait until a general offensive can be prepared following the arrival of reinforcements. Throughout these operations P-39s have continually hit ground positions and troops all along the coast, flying as many as 11 strikes on some days.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 20 B-24's out of Nanumea bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshalls, scoring hits on the landing ground and a cargo vessel.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 5 B-25's and 16 P-40's bomb Hanshow and strafe 15-20 small boats N of the city; 2 other B-25's attack the harbor and town of Amoy; 2 direct hits are scored on a docked freighter.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 25 B-24's bomb Chabai and Buka; 20 B-25's of the 42nd BG hit Kahili Airfield. Lost is B-25 "Careless" (rescued). Six others bomb and strafe a possible radio station at Mutupina Point; fighter patrols strafe Gazelle and Queen Carola Harbors, sinking a barge and damaging a schooner. The 371st Bombardment Squadron, 307th BG (Heavy), based on Espiritu Santo with B-24's, begins operating from Guadalcanal.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: At 0510 hours local, the USN escort aircraft carrier USS Liscome Bay is struck abaft the after engine room by a torpedo fired by the Japanese submarine HIJMS I-175 about 21 nautical miles WSW of Butaritari Island, Makin Atoll, Gilbert Islands, in position 02.54N, 172.30E. The aircraft bomb magazine detonates a few moments later and the entire interior bursts into flames.
    At 0533 hours Liscome Bay lists to starboard and sinks carrying Rear Admiral Henry M. Mullinix, commander of Task Group 52.3, Liscome Bay's skipper Captain I.D. Wiltsie, 53 other officers, and 591 enlisted men down with her; 272 of her crew are rescued. One of the enlisted men killed is black Ship's Cook Third Class Doris "Dorie" Miller who was awarded the Navy Cross at Pearl Harbor by moving his mortally wounded captain to a place of greater safety and then manning a 50 caliber machine gun on the deck of the USS West Virginia until he ran out of ammunition and is ordered to abandon ship. Miller is commended by Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox on 1 April 1942, and on 27 May 1942 he received the Navy Cross, which Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, personally presented to Miller on board aircraft carrier USS Enterprise for his extraordinary courage in battle. Speaking of Miller, Nimitz remarked: "This marks the first time in this conflict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacific Fleet to a member of his race and I'm sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts."

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the 3d Marine Division makes substantial progress, gaining commanding ground in the Piva Forks area.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): Colonel Neel E Kearby becomes Commanding Officer of the V Fighter Command. In New Guinea, 30+ B-25's, B-26's, and A-20's bomb village of Kalasa; 15 A-20's and B-25's, with P-38's escorting, hit stores and supplies in the Finschhafen area. 20+ B-24's, supported by P-38's, bomb Gasmata. The 25th Liaison Squadron, V Bomber Command, transfers from Sydney to Brisbane with L-5's. They will fly their first combat mission in Feb 44.

    EAST INDIES: Eighteen USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s hit shipping at Halmahera Island, Netherlands East Indies.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: On Makin Atoll, Regimental Combat Team 165, less the 3d Battalion, leaves for Hawaii. The 3d Battalion and miscellaneous units are left behind to conduct minor mopping up operations and to support the construction forces. Command is turned over to Colonel Clesen H. Tenney, Garrison Force commander. The 27th Infantry Division casualties for Makin total 218, of whom eight are killed and eight die of wounds. Japanese casualties, aside from those subsequently inflicted during the mop-up, are estimated at 550, including 105 prisoners.
    On Tarawa Atoll, two Marine Regimental Combat Team's (the 8th and the 2d) leave for Hawaii. Embarking from Betio Island, the 2d Battalion of 6th Marine Regiment, guided by scouts of the 2d Tank Battalion, begins an uneventful search for the Japanese on islands up the long east side of Tarawa Atoll.

    UNITED STATES: The aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18 ) is commissioned. The USN now has ten aircraft carriers in commission.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 21 B-24s bomb the warehouse area and docks at Hankow, China. 3 others hit the Haiphong, French Indochina area. 22 B-25s bomb a storage area near Lashio, Burma, targets of opportunity in the Hankow, China area, and the towns of Wanling and Wan Lai-Kam, Burma, and Siangtan, and Wuchang, China. 120+ P-40s, P-38s and P-51s on armed reconnaissance attack many targets of opportunity in E Burma and SW and SE China, concentrating on river and rail traffic and supplies at Chefang, Hengshan, and the Sinshih-Changsha, China area.

    CHINA: Japanese forces in southern China, attempting to gain contact with their forces garrisoning French Indochina, take Nanning.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 32 P-47s fly close support strikes in the Pinwe and Bhamo se#2ctors; 50 P-47s attack troops and supply areas at Panma, Hpa-Hpen, Nawng-Sang, Kawlin, Wahkyet, Kawngai, and in the Pintha area, 8 damage bridges at Meza, Namhkai, and Hsenwi while 10 others hit Lashio Airfield; 6 B-25s pound the storage and ferry area at Meza and 4 damage approaches to the Namhkai and Hsenwi road bridges. 323 transport sorties are flown to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 2 B-24s from Saipan Island on a shipping reconnaissance attack vessels at Haha Jima and Chichi Jima Islands. 3 B-24s from Guam Island on armed reconnaissance bomb Marcus. 14 Saipan based P-47s strafe landing ground on Pagan.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): The XXI Bomber Command flies its first mission against Japan; the objective is Tokyo; the 111 B-29s are led by 73d Bombardment Wing (Very Heavy) Commanding General, Brigadier General Emmett O'Donnell Jr piloting DAUNTLESS DOTTY, copiloted by Major Robert K Morgan, erstwhile pilot of the famed B-17, MEMPHIS BELLE; 35 B-29s bomb the primary target, the Musashino aircraft plant; 50 bomb the secondary target, the urban area and docks; 17 abort enroute; the remainder are unable to bomb due to mechanical difficulties; 1 B-29 crashes off Honshu Island when a fighter rams the bomber, shearing off the elevator and right horizontal stabilizer, becoming the first XXI Bomber Command B-29 lost to Japanese action; 1 other ditches after running out of fuel; B-29 gunners claim 7 aircraft downed.

    Per Jim Bowman "On this day, after repeated daily delays due to bad weather, the 73rd Bomb Wing launched its long-anticipated attack against Japan, the first bombing raid on the main island of Honshu since Doolittle's raiders in April 1942. Primary target was the Musashino Aircraft Engine Factory near Tokyo, secondary target was the dock and industrial area of Tokyo.
    As its contribution to this mission, the 500th Bomb Group scheduled 27 aircraft. Assigned bombing altitude for the 500th was 32,000 feet. Each plane carried a mix of general purpose bombs and incendiaries. Take-off was between 0740 and 0825 local. One plane, Z-30 (LaMarche crew) failed to take off due to loss of power in #3 engine. Of the 26 planes that got airborne, four -- Z-1 (Goldsworthy crew), Z-10 (Thompson crew), Z-27 (Cordray crew) and Z-49 (Feathers crew) -- had to abort due to engine trouble.
    The 22 planes which reached Japan found heavy cloud cover over the primary. Only three bombed the primary through the clouds, while 17 dropped their bombs on the secondary target or targets of opportunity. The 20 planes which bombed included Z-2 (Irvin crew), Z-4 (Oswald crew), Z-5 (Luman crew), Z-6 (Field crew), Z-7 (Sullivan crew), Z-8 (Fitzgerald crew), Z-9 (Hatch crew), Z-21 (Pierce crew), Z-23 (Hays crew), Z-24 (Tackett crew), Z-25 (Van Trigt crew), Z-28 (Gerwick crew?), Z-41 (Ashley crew?), Z-42 (Moreland crew), Z-43 (Setterich crew?), Z-44 (crew unknown), Z-45 (McClanahan crew), Z-46 (Holmes crew), Z-48 (Black crew), Z-50 (Braden crew). Two aircraft -- Z-3 (Samuelson crew) and Z-29 (Savage crew) -- experienced bomb rack malfunctions over the target and jettisoned their bombs later.
    Flak was light, fighter opposition was also light. The 500th BG fortunately suffered no losses on its first mission. Unfortunately, due to the cloud cover, damage to the target was negligible.
    After a very long flight, all planes returned safely to Saipan, landing between 1930 and 2200 local.
    One footnote to this mission. Some people recall it as taking place on Thanksgiving Day. But 24 Nov was actually the Friday after Thanksgiving. The confusion probably results from the fact that because of the International Date Line, it was still 23 Nov, Thanksgiving Day, back in the States."


    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: In the Philippine Islands, B-24s bomb AA positions and targets of opportunity at Camp Downes and Panalisan Point and US fighters attack and destroy several aircraft over Carigara Bay and the Leyte Island area; B-24s hit AA positions and other targets at Matina Airfield on Mindanao; units arriving on Leyte Island: 25th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, at Dulag from Biak Island with F-5s; 65th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 43d Bombardment Group (Heavy), at Tacloban from Owi with B-24s. Lost on a flight from Biak to Hollanida is C-46 42-101046.

    JAPAN: The USAAF Twentieth Air Force's XXI Bomber Command flies Mission 7, their first against Japan; the objective is Tokyo. The 111 B-29s are led by Brigadier General Emmett O'Donnell Jr, Commanding General, 73d Bombardment Wing (Very Heavy), piloting "Dauntless Dotty," copiloted by Major Robert K Morgan, erstwhile pilot of the famed B-17 "Memphis Belle." Thirty five B-29s bomb the primary target, the Musashino aircraft plant while 50 bomb the secondary target, the urban area and docks. Seventeen others abort en route, the remainder are unable to bomb due to mechanical difficulties. Unfortunately, even with the use of radar, overcast skies and bad weather prove an insurmountable obstacle at 30,000 feet and fewer than 50 bombs hit the primary target. One B-29 crashes off Honshu Island when a fighter rams the bomber, shearing off the elevator and right horizontal stabilizer, becoming the first XXI Bomber Command B-29 lost to Japanese action; one
    other ditches after running out of fuel. B-29 gunners claim 7-18-9 Japanese aircraft. This is the first time Tokyo has been bombed since the Doolittle raid of 18 April 1942.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 1st Battalion of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, repels a minor counterattack against Kilay Ridge. In the XXIV Corps area, the 32d Infantry Regiment recovers some ground previously lost on Shoestring Ridge and holds the perimeter--about 2,000 yards long and less than 1,500 yards deep against a vigorous counterattack during the night of 24/25 November.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb antiaircraft positions and targets of opportunity at Camp Downes and Panalisan Point and fighters attack and destroy several aircraft over Carigara Bay and the Leyte Island area. B-24s hit antiaircraft positions and other targets at Matina Aerodrome on Mindanao Island. P-40s and P-47s attack one of the groups of ships involved in the 5th phase of the TA Operation, sinking a submarine chaser and three landing ships in Cataingan Bay, Masbate Island.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: USN heavy cruisers USS Chester, Pensacola and Salt Lake City bombard Iwo Jima.

    1945
     
  14. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 6,254

    1931
    CHINA: The Government appeals for the establishment of a neutral zone between Japanese and Chinese forces. The Japanese are advancing on Chinchow.

    UNITED STATES: Secretary of State Henry Stimson approves the idea of a neutral commission for Manchuria "to support the League of Nations Council action."

    1935
    CHINA: The failure of the Japanese to establish an autonomous North China leads the Japanese government to create an East Hopei Autonomous Council to govern Japanese-occupied north China (between T'ungchou, outside Peinping, and the Yellow Sea). The Japanese are able to openly smuggle goods wholesale into China through this autonomous region, including narcotics from the world market. This policy is met by student demonstrations in Peiping against Japanese imperialism.


    1940
    PACIFIC OCEAN: The 247 ton coastal steamer SS Holmwood, en route from New Zealand's Chatham Islands, located about 350 nautical miles (644 kilometers) east of New Zealand, to the mainland is intercepted by the German raiders HK Komet (Ship number 45 known to the British as Raider B) and Orion (Ship number 36 known to the British as Raider A) and the supply ship Kulmerland at 0720 hours. The Holmwood is carrying 29 passengers and crew, including four women and four children, 1,370 sheep, two dogs and a horse. All of the crew and passengers are removed to Komet and the sheep were distributed among the three ships and SS Holmwood was sunk by gunfire.

    UNITED STATES: Additional National Guard units are inducted into Federal service. Called up are two divisions, six brigades, 21 regiments and five observation squadrons. The divisions are Alabama's 31st and Texas' 36th. Two of the regiments are coast artillery regiments and one is a cavalry regiment

    1941
    GERMANY: In Berlin, Finland signs the Anti-Comintern Pact. Germany invited Finland to adhere to the pact in early November, but there was considerable reluctance in Finland to do so. It was thought that Finnish adherence would worsen the relations with the Western Allies. On the other hand, Finland is very dependant on German deliveries of food supplies, and had just requested 175,000 tons of grain. In the end, the Finnish government decided that joining the pact is the lesser of two evils, because adequate level of food supplies has to be secured for the duration of winter.
    Renewal for five years of the Anti-Comintern Pact of 25 November 1936 at Berlin, by Germany, Japan, Italy, Hungary, Spain, Manchukuo, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, Rumania, Slovakia, and the Japanese puppet Nanking regime in China.

    JAPAN: Admiral YAMAMOTO Isoroku, Commander-in-Chief, Combined Fleet, issues Operations Order No. 5: "The Carrier Striking Task Force will immediately complete taking on supplies and depart with utmost secrecy from Hitokappu Bay (Etorofu Island, Kurile Islands) on 26 November and advance to the standby point (42 N, 170 W) by the evening of 3 December." The standby point is about 1,380 nautical miles (2 557 kilometers) north-northwest of Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii and 728 nautical miles (1 348 kilometers) south-southwest of Dutch Harbor, Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands, Territory of Alaska.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Japanese troop transports en route to Malaya are sighted off Formosa.

    UNITED STATES: The Government establishes compulsory convoying of merchant ships in the Pacific.

    WAKE ISLAND: USN submarines USS Triton (SS-201) and Tambor (SS-198) arrive off Wake Island on simulated war patrols.


    1942
    ALASKA: After eight months of work, the Alcan Highway is completed.

    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force aircraft fly reconnaissance is flown over the Semichi Islands and Japanese-held Kiska and Attu Islands.

    CHINA: USAAF Tenth Air Force's China Air Task Force B-25s and P-40s cripple three freighters on the Pearl River near Canton.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, firm Japanese opposition on the entire front has resulted in a virtual stalemate. Artillery fire is exchanged and patrols are active in some sectors. In the air, USAAF Fifth Air Force P-38s hit the airfield at Lae.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-17 lands 11 tons of supplies at Kamimbo Bay, Guadalcanal. Submarine missions to supply the beleaguered Japanese garrison on Guadalcanal will continue through the end of November.

    1943
    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In a raid on Rangoon, Burma, B-24's of the 308th BG (Heavy), borrowed from the Fourteenth Air Force, are unable to bomb because of bad weather, but B-25's, covered by P-51's, manage to hit Mingaladon airfield, damaging the field and claiming 2 airplanes destroyed. Japanese fighters intercept and in the ensuing battle the B-25's and P-51's claim 2 shot down; 2 P-51's are lost.

    MARSHALL ISLANDS: Carrier-based aircraft of USN Task Group 50.1 attack Mili Atoll.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 14 B-25's and 16 P-38's and P-51's attack the airfield at Shinchiku, hitting a parking area, hangars, barracks, and other buildings. 32 enemy aircraft are claimed destroyed in the air and on the ground; 16 P-40's on armed reconnaissance over the Hanshow-Chanpte area sink 2 60-ft (18.3 m) boats and 15 sampans and strafe many small supply and troop carrying boats. The 16th Fighter Squadron, 51st Fighter Group, transfers from Hengyang to Chengkung, China with P-40's. A detachment begins operating from Tsuyung, China.

    FORMOSA: Forty-two Japanese aircraft are destroyed on the ground at Shinchiku airfield on Formosa as the USAAF Fourteenth Air Force mounts its first attack on the island. This mission is under the command of Colonel "Tex" Hill, Commanding Officer of the 23d Fighter Group. The attack force consisted of 14 North American B-25Cs, eight battle worn but newly arrived North American P-51As and eight P38s.
    Taking off from Suichwan, the attack force flies at low altitude over the Formosa Straight to avoid detection. The P-38s lead the mission with the job of destroying any airborne Japanese aircraft; they shot down 15 of 20 defenders. The B-25s came next at 1,000 feet dropping fragmentation bombs on the airfield. The P-51As, which claim five airborne Japanese aircraft, come in next strafing followed by the P-38s making one more strafing pass. Approximately 22 Japanese aircraft are destroyed without the loss of any USAAF aircraft.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): P-39's strafe Bogadjim Road; Sattelberg falls to the Australian 9 Division. The 25th and 26th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadrons, 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, transfer from Sydney, New South Wales to Brisbane, Queensland, Australia with F-5's. They will fly their first mission on 5 Feb and 10 Feb 44 respectively.

    NEW GUINEA: A company of the Australian 2/48th Battalion enters Sattelberg, Northeast New Guinea, and raises the Australian flag at 1000 hours local.
    Lockheed (Model 18-40-11) Lodestar, ex-Netherlands East Indies Air Force serial number LT9-08, registered VH-CAB by the Australian airline QANTAS, crashes into a hill shortly after talking off from Ward's Strip, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. All 15 aboard are killed

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN destroyer USS Radford sinks Japanese submarine HIJMS I-19 about 54 nautical miles W of Butaritari Island, Makin Atoll, Gilbert Islands, in position 03.10N, 171.55E.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The Battle of Cape St. George is fought during the early hours as the five ships of USN Destroyer Squadron 23 intercept five Japanese destroyers off Cape St. George on the southern tip of New Ireland Island. USS Charles Ausburne, Claxton, and Dyson sink HIJMS Onami with torpedoes and HIJMS Yugiri with gunfire; the same three U.S. ships, joined by USS Spence and Converse, sink HIJMS Makinami with torpedoes and gunfire and damage HIJMS Uzuki. The USN destroyers suffer no damage.

    RAAF: After attacking Japanese barges off New Britain, crashed is Beaufighter A19-139.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: On Apamama Atoll, the Apamama Occupation Force, based on the 3d Battalion of the 6th Marine Regiment, is en route to atoll. On Tarawa Atoll, after scouting about half way up the eastern side of the atoll, Company D of the 2d Marine Tank Battalion is recalled to the village of Eita to prepare to reconnoiter other atolls. The 2d Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, continues an uneventful trek up the Tarawa Atoll.
    The first unit of the garrison air force, USN VF-1 equipped with F6F Hellcats, takes off from escort aircraft carriers USS Barnes and Nassau and land on Betio Island. Just after sunset, 13 Japanese 'Betty" bombers from the Marshall Islands attack USN ships off Makin Atoll with torpedoes; no hits are scored.
    In a second attack, F6F Hellcat pilots guided by a VT-6 radar-equipped TBM Avenger, shoot down three "Bettys" at sea between 1725 and 1928 hours local. However, the commanding officer of VF-6, Lieutenant Commander Edward "Butch" O'Hare, is lost.
    O'Hare was a Medal of Honor recipient for action on 20 February 1942 when he shot down five Japanese bombers who were attempting to bomb a USN aircraft carrier.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): A B-24 aborts an armed photo mission over Matsuwa Island due to weather and instead radarbombs Kurabu Airfield on Paramushiru Island; B-25s cancel a shipping sweep due to weather.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 12 B-25s hit warehouses, village and town areas at Lashio and Wanling, Burma. 6 attack rail targets, trucks, and buildings at Phu Lang Thuong, French Indochina. 75 P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance attack river, road, and rail traffic, troops, buildings, and other targets of opportunity at several Thailand, Burma, S China, and N French Indochina locations, including areas around Bhre and Lampang, Thailand; Paoching, Ankang, Ishan, and Hochih, China; Namsang, and Mongyu, Burma; and Phu Lang Thuong, French Indochina.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 24 fighter-bombers support ground forces in the Bhamo area; 24 bomb an airfield at Kawlin while 8 more strafe Tabingaung Airfield and town area; 12 attack the Meza railroad station and boxcars in nearby bridge area, storage and personnel areas in the Lashio area and at Nawngyang, Ashang, and Man Mao; 8 P-47s strafe targets of opportunity along the Wuntho-Shwebo rail line. Transports fly 325 sorties to forward bases and frontline areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 7 Guam Island-based B-24s, escorting a photo aircraft over the Bonin and Kazan Islands, bomb Chichi Jima, Muko Jima, and Haha Jima Islands.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s and fighter-bombers hit airfields on Ceram and Boeroe (Buroe) Islands and B-24s on armed reconnaissance over northern Borneo hit shipping and other targets of opportunity. During the night of 25/26 November, B-25s hit airfields in northeastern Celebes and Halmahera Islands.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the South China Sea, USN submarine USS Cavalla sinks Japanese destroyer HIJMS Shimotsuki about 220 nautical miles ENE of Singapore, Malaya.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: On Leyte, Lieutenant General Walter Krueger, Commanding General Sixth Army, halts work on airfields. In the X Corps area, Company A, the most advanced unit of the 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, on Kilay Ridge, repels a heavy Japanese counterattack, during the night of 25/26 November. In the XXIV Corps area, the 32d Infantry Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division contains another Japanese counterattack, which is made in less strength after nightfall. The 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division, starts s difficult westward trek over the mountains from Burauen toward Mahonag, 10 miles distant, to ease pressure on the corps units driving on Ormoc.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces fighter-bombers range over wide areas of Masbate, Cebu, and Leyte Islands, and surrounding waters, attacking shipping, airfields, bivouacs, and a variety of targets.
    Carrier-based aircraft of USN Task Groups 38.3 and 38.4 bomb Japanese shipping off central Luzon. Planes from carrier USS Ticonderoga sink heavy cruiser Kumano in Dasol Bay on west central Luzon. F6Fs, SB2Cs and TBMs from carriers USS Ticonderoga and Essex , along with F6Fs and TBMs from small carrier USS Langley attack a convoy about 15 nautical miles SW of Santa Cruz, on the west coast of Luzon, and sink a coast defense ship and three landing ships. Planes from carrier USS Intrepid sink two fast transports and damage a fast transport and ah escort destroyer in Balanacan Harbor on Marinduque Island. Planes from USS Essex and Langley sink an army cargo ship and damage a cargo ship in San Fernando harbor.
    Kamikazes breach the fleet's fighter defenses, however, and press home determined attacks, damaging carriers USS Essex, Intrepid and Hancock and small carrier USS Cabot. Small carrier USS Independence is damaged by crash of own aircraft into island structure.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the Australian 9th Battalion, 7th Brigade, 3rd Division, relieves the 2d Battalion, U.S. 132d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Ocean Area (CINCPOA) issues Operation Plan 11-44 for the invasion of Iwo Jima. The USN Fifth Fleet commander is to seize Iwo and develop air bases there. The invasion date is tentatively set for 3 February 1945.

    CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 189, NOVEMBER 25, 1944
    Seventh Army Air Force planes bombed shipping and dock installations at Chichi Jima and Haha Jima in the Bonins on November 22 (West Longi¬tude Date). Hits were scored on docking facilities on Haha Jima. On November 24, Chichi Jima was again struck by Seventh Air Force planes.
    On November 22, Corsairs of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing destroyed a number of barges and struck at installations in the Northern Palaus. The airfield at Yap was hit on the same date by Marine Corsairs.
    Three barges were sunk and fires were started in enemy held bases in the Northern Palaus which were attacked by Second Marine Aircraft Wing fighters on November 24. On the same date Seventh Army Air Force planes bombed Arakabesan, leaving large fires.
    Installations on Marcus Island were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on November 24.
    Second Marine Aircraft Wing Corsairs encountered moderate antiaircraft fire in attacks on Yap airfield on November 21. On the same date, Marine night fighters hit enemy held bases in the Northern Palaus and Seventh Army Air Force bombers pounded Arakabesan and Yap.
    Thunderbolts of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked the airfield on Pagan in the Marianas on November 21. A Japanese reconnaissance plane was shot down by an Army fighter over Saipan on November 24.
    Ponape in the Carolines was bombed on November 21 and 23 by fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Targets were hit in the area of the airfield, the seaplane ramp and fuel dumps.
    Planes of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing on November 21 and 23, carried out neutralization raids in the Marshalls.

    1945

     
  15. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 6334

    1931
    SWITZERLAND: The League of Nations Council notifies China and Japan that Council members propose to send observers to the Chinchow, China, area to establish a neutral zone.

    1941
    JAPAN: The Carrier Group of the Pearl Harbor Strike Force (Vice Admiral NAGUMA Chuichi), consisting of six aircraft carriers (HIJMS Akagi, Hirju, Kaga, Shokaku, Sorju and Zuikaku), two battleships (HIJMS Hiei and Kirishima), two heavy cruisers (HIJMS Cikuma and Tone), one light cruiser (HIJMS Abukuma), ten destroyers, three submarines and seven oilers, sails from remote Hittokappu Bay, Etorofu Island, Kurile Islands, its departure shrouded in secrecy. Its mission, should talks between the U.S. and Japan fail to resolve the diplomatic impasse over Far Eastern and Pacific questions, is to attack the U.S. Pacific Fleet wherever it is found in Hawaiian waters.
    The Foreign Office sends a message to the Japanese Embassy in Washington, D.C. containing the following statement: "When you reach a settlement in accordance with our new proposal, it is essential that you secure guarantees for the acquisition of goods in connection with clauses 2 and 3 of that proposal. Of these goods, the acquisition of petroleum is one of the most pressing and urgent requirements of the Empire.
    Therefore, in accordance with the course of negotiations, prior to the signing of an understanding, and at as early a date as possible, I would like to have you make our wishes known insofar as petroleum imports are concerned along the following lines: 4 million tons per year from the United States. (This figure is the average amount of imports during the years 1938, '39, and '40 from the United States. The breakdown according to type, aviation gasoline included, corresponds to the actual figures covering imports before the freezing legislation went into effect.) That is to say, roughly 333,000 tons per month. In addition, on the basis of past negotiations and roughly in the agreed amounts, we hope to import from the Netherlands Indies 1 million tons per year.

    UNITED STATES: In a meeting between U.S. Secretary of State Cordell Hull, Japanese Ambassador NOMURA Kichisaburo and Special Envoy KURUSU Saburo in Washington, Hull offers a plan of a broad but simple settlement covering the entire Pacific area as a counter proposal to Japan.
    The U.S. plan calls for the Japanese evacuation of French IndoChina and China, recognition of the territorial integrity of these states, extend official recognition to the Nationalist Chinese government, and conclude a multilateral non-aggression pact. Once the Japanese acted on these points, the U.S. would begin negotiations to establish a liberal trade policy between the two nations. Special Envoy KURUSU said this was tantamount to the end of negotiations. "When they reported our answer to their Government it would be likely to throw up its hands."
    Ambassador NOMURA sends a message to Tokyo with the following entry: "Judging from the progress of present Japanese-American relations, with which you are well acquainted through successive telegrams, the American proposal on the 26th showed a great disparity between the demands of both parties. Unfortunately, there are no hopes of acceptance of our demands within the time limit you set." Special Envoy KURUSU calls YAMAMOTO Kumaicho, Head of American Division of Japanese Foreign Office in Tokyo, and says, "I have made all efforts, but they will not yield. I sent a cable expressing my opinions to the Foreign Minister this morning. The situation is just like that. Otherwise there is no means of accomplishing it. I shall cable you now. Already, you have a general understanding I imagine. Accordingly, I do not know how things will turn out regarding my meeting with the President. Hull is not making much progress it seems."
    Secretary of State Hull warns U.S. Army and Navy officials of an imminent Japanese surprise attack stating, "There was practically no possibility of an agreement being achieved with Japan."
    U.S. Army G-2 (Intelligence) sends a memorandum to General George S. Marshall, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, stating: "The following information was received from the Commandant 14th Naval District (in Hawaii) through the Office of Naval Intelligence at 12: 45 a. m., this date:
    - 1. The Japanese have been organizing a naval task force for the past month comprising:
    - a. Second Fleet: Under the command of Commander-in-Chief, Second Fleet. (The Second Fleet corresponds roughly to our Scouting Force, consisting mainly of strong Cruiser Divisions).
    - b. Third Fleet which formerly was the China Coast Command Force including its first and second base forces, constituted by miscellaneous small vessels.
    - c. Combined Air Force consisting of all large carrier forces.
    - d. Also destroyer squadron 3, air squadron 7, submarine squadron 5, and possibly 1 battleship division from First Fleet consisting of 3 battleships.
    - Summary of Above: 14 Heavy Cruisers, 4 Light Cruisers, 10 Carriers, 3 Light Cruisers. 2 Destroyer Squadrons (24 destroyers), 2 Submarine Squadrons (18 submarines), and possibly 3 battleships.
    - 2. The combined air force has assembled in Takao, Formosa, with some units believed in Hainan Island. The Third Fleet is believed moving in direction of Takao and Bako, Pescadores off West Coast of Formosa, from home waters in Japan. Units from the Second Fleet are at present possibly en route to South China as advance scouts. Strong concentration of submarines and air groups in the Marshalls. Present location other units of this task force are not known.
    - 3. The evaluation put upon the above information by the Commandant, 14th Naval District is that a strong force may be preparing to operate in Southeastern Asia, while component parts thereof may be expected to operate from Palao and the Marshall Islands.
    The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Harold R. Stark, sends the following message to the Commander-in-Chief Pacific Fleet, Admiral Husband E. Kimmel: "In order to keep the planes of the Second Marine Aircraft Wing available for expeditionary use OPNAV has requested and Army has agreed to station twenty five Army pursuit planes at Midway and a similar number at Wake provided you consider this feasible and desirable.
    It will be necessary for you to transport these planes and ground crews from Oahu to these stations on an aircraft carrier. Planes will be flown off at destination and ground personnel landed in boats essential spare parts tools and ammunition will be taken in the carrier or on later trips of Regular Navy supply vessels. Army understands these forces must be quartered in tents. Navy must be responsible for supplying water and subsistence and transporting other Army supplies. Stationing these planes must not be allowed to interfere with planned movements of Army bombers to Philippines. Additional parking areas should be laid promptly if necessary. Can Navy bombs now at outlying positions be carried by Army bombers which may fly to those positions for supporting Navy operations. Confer with commanding general and advise as soon as practicable." A second message is sent stating that the "Army has offered to make available some units of Infantry for reenforcing defense battalions now on station if you consider this desirable. Army also proposes to prepare in Hawaiian garrison troops for advance bases which you may occupy but is unable, at this time to provide any antiaircraft units. Take this into consideration in your plans and advise when practicable number of troops desired and recommend armament.

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs a bill officially establishing the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. In 1789, President George Washington became the first president to proclaim a Thanksgiving holiday, when, at the request of Congress, he proclaimed November 26, a Tuesday, as a day of national thanksgiving for the U.S. Constitution. However, it was not until 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving to fall on the last Thursday of November, that the modern holiday was celebrated nationally. With a few deviations, Lincoln's precedent was followed annually by every subsequent president until 1939.
    In 1939, Roosevelt departed from tradition by declaring 23 November, the next to last Thursday that year, as Thanksgiving Day. Considerable controversy surrounded this deviation, and some Americans refused to honor Roosevelt's declaration and he conceded defeat today by signing the bill.

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A B-24 reconnoitering Holtz Bay harbor on Japanese held Attu Island spots shipping targets which are subsequently hit by four B-26s escorted by four P-38s; one cargo ship is damaged. Reconnaissance is flown over Rat Island, Agattu and Semichi Islands and the Japanese-held Kiska Island shipping and the north coast of Attu Island; two P-38s and a B-26 sustain minor damage.

    AUSTRALIA: At 0320 hours local, Japanese bombers attack the Darwin town area and the Strauss and Hughes Airfields.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: Japanese Lieutenant General Imamura Hitoshi formally assumes command of the 8th Area Army at Rabaul, New Britain Island. (The 8th Area Army is responsible for the 17th Army in the Solomon Islands and the 18th Army in New Guinea.) Colonel Sugita presents a paper outlining the current situation on Guadalcanal and suggesting withdrawal but General Imamura refuses to formally accept the paper because it is defeatist. Major Hayashi arrives from Guadalcanal with the news that all rice and barley there would be entirely consumed that day.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the stalemate continues on Gona front. Further frontal and flanking attacks of 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, toward Sanananda makes limited progress: The 1st Battalion (-) is pinned down on the Soputa- Sanananda track after a 100-yard advance; on the left, the 3d Battalion (-) drives east to within 700 yards of the Killerton trail; on the right, Company L and the Australians finally overrun the bitterly contested food dump.
    The Urbana Force halts frontal and right flank attacks on the Triangle and prepares to make a strong effort on left, since the Japanese are disposed in less strength west of Entrance Creek and the terrain is more favorable. The Warren Force, under personal observation of Major General Edwin Harding, Commanding General 32d Infantry Division, makes a determined effort to advance after strong air and artillery preparation.
    The Japanese retire into bunkers during the bombardment and emerge afterward to meet the attack. The 3d Battalion of the 128th Infantry Regiment (-) and 1st Battalion of 126th Infantry Regiment (-)
    advance abreast, the latter on the left followed by the 1st Battalion of the 128th. Little is accomplished by the attack. Company I of the 128th Infantry Regiment and the Australian 2/6th Independent Company, Maroubra Force, charged respectively with securing the west and east ends of New Strip, are unable to advance. The Japanese retain air superiority over Buna front and sink a lugger bound for Hariko with ammunition. The 127th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, reaches Port Moresby from Australia.
    In Northeast New Guinea, Fifth Air Force P-40s, A-20s, and B-25s attack airfields and antiaircraft positions in the Buna area while B-26s strike the Salamaua area.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 5 B-25's and 16 fighters attack Kiangling airfield; 2 other B-25's damage freighter in Honghai Bay; 12 P-40's attack numerous boats in the Changte-Tehshan area. 8 other P-40's hit railroad yards at Cam Duong, French Indochina.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Eight USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-40s hit railroad yards at Cam Duong.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): Buka Airfield and Bonis Airfield are hit by 40+ B-24's, 30+ B-25's, and 30+ fighter aircraft. A few RNZAF Venturas attack Green Island, causing heavy damage in the bivouac and supply area and sinking a barge. A single B-25 bombs Ballale Airfield.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): In New Guinea, almost 40 medium bombers hit barge hideouts near Sio; P-40's and P-47's strafe villages and targets of opportunity around Alexishafen, Madang, and Nubia; P-39's attack a force of about 40 Japanese fighters and bombers in the Finschhafen area, claiming 4 shot down. B-24's bomb Gasmata and score hits on a cruiser near Ubili. Lost on a recon flight are Boomerang A46-132 and Boomerang A46-109.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, fighting at Pabu Hill continues as the Australian 2/43rd Battalion, 24th Brigade, 9th Division, repulses strong Japanese attacks. The 2/43rd Battalion holds Pabu, one of the outlying features near Sattelberg, against strong Japanese attacks.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the I Marine Amphibious Corps continues to expand the perimeter of the beachhead. The 3d Marine Division is now at the southern shore of Lake Kathleen.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: On Apamama Atoll, V Amphibious Corps scouts are recalled as the Apamama landing force arrives and begins organizing defenses of the atoll. On Tarawa Atoll, the 2d Battalion of the 6th Marine Regiment reaches Buariki, the last relatively large island of the atoll, and prepares to attack Japanese forces believed to be there.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): A shipping sweep by 4 B-25s is called off due to weather.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 19 B-25s and 20 P-51s blast railway cars, station, and track, hit several trucks, and hit town areas at Hochih, China and Phu Lang Thuong, French Indochina. 6 B-25s damage a bridge at Kengluang, Thailand. 90+ P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s hit river, rail, and road traffic and other targets of opportunity over wide S China areas, 40 of them concentrating on targets between Kweiyi and Changsha and around Liuchow, China. A flight of the 21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Fourteenth AF, begins operating from Luliang, China with F-5s (squadron is based at Kunming).

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command area, the British 36th Division, replacing the 72nd Brigade with the 29th Brigade, patrols actively in the Pinwe area.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 16 P-47s continue close support strikes; about 60 fighter-bombers hit concentrations, supply and ammunition dumps, and rail targets at Panghkai, Kunmong, Mabein, Lashio, Panku, and around Meza; 7 others on a railroad sweep hit targets of opportunity between Maymyo and Man Pyen. Transports fly 300+ sorties to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): P-47s from Saipan strafe the airfield on Pagan. During the night a B-24 on a snooper mission from Guam bombs Iwo Jima. B-24s from Angaur Airfield bomb Arakabesan in the Palau.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 22d BG and the 33d Bombardment Squadron move from Leyte to Angaur Airfield with B-24s.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s pound airfields in the Ambon-Ceram Islands area. Other bombers and fighters fly light strikes and armed reconnaissance missions against a variety of targets on northern Celebes, northern Borneo and the Halmahera Islands.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 1st Battalion of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24 Infantry Division, relieves Company A with Company C on Kilay Ridge. The battalion is highly vulnerable to Japanese attack from different directions and is maintaining positions with the use of artillery. In the XXIV Corps area, the Japanese make another night attack, on the night of 26/27 November, on Shoestring Ridge, about 200 Japanese troops gaining positions in the bamboo thicket within the American lines, but 400 Japanese dead are counted at the conclusion of the action.
    Over 40 USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s, some with fighter support, bomb La Carlota and Talisay Airfields on Negros and Cebu Islands respectively; fighter-bombers hit an airfield and various targets of opportunity throughout the area. B-24s bomb an airfield near Davao, Mindanano Island. Other bombers and fighters fly light strikes and armed reconnaissance missions against a variety of targets in southern Luzon and Mindanao.

    1945

     
  16. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 6,390

    1931

    CHINA: Japan refuses to accept the good offices of neutral observers to establish a zone between the Chinese and Japanese armies stating, "The policy which the Japanese Government had so far consistently pursued in the true interest of good relations between China and Japan had been not to resort, in disputes capable of direct settlement with China, to the interposition of third parties."

    1937
    JAPAN: Japan rejects the idea of relinquishing South Sea island mandates stating, "Maintenance of Japan's Mandate over South Sea islands which formerly belonged to Germany is the established policy of this empire. . . ." These mandates, which had been granted to Japan in 1919, are located in the Caroline, Mariana and Marshall Islands. In 1935, the Japanese prohibited foreigners from visiting these islands.


    1940
    PACIFIC OCEAN: The 16,710 ton New Zealand passenger liner MV Rangitane is sunk by gunfire from the German auxiliary cruiser H.K. Orion (Ship 36 also known as Raider A by the British) about 443 nautical miles (820 kilometers) east of Auckland, New Zealand, in position 37.00S, 176.00W. The ship, en route from Auckland to Liverpool, England, is the largest passenger liner to be sunk by surface raiders during WWII. Rangitane had encountered the Orion, auxiliary cruiser H.K. Komet (Ship 45 and known to the British as Raider B) and the supply ship Kulmerland at about 0320 hours. (The same ships had encountered and sunk the freighter SS Holmwood two days ago.) Rangitane is carrying 311 people, including 36 women passengers) and only 16 die. During the next three weeks the Germans sink six more ships and have over 600 prisoners. The ships head for Emirau Island in the St. Matthias Island group and releases 512 men, women and children; they are eventually rescued by the Australians. About 150 men are held as prisoners as returned to Germany as POWs.

    1941
    CHINA: U.S. passenger liner SS President Madison, chartered for the purpose, sails from Shanghai with the 2d Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment embarked, bound for the Philippine Islands.

    HAWAII: USN Communication Intelligence Summary, 27 November: "General.-Traffic volume a little below normal due to poor signals on the frequencies above 7000 kcs. Tokyo-Takao (Formosa) circuit unreadable on mid-watch. Some tactical traffic intercepted from carriers. Bako, Sama, and Saigon active as originators, addressing traffic to each other and to the Chiefs of Staff of Second, Third Fleets and Combined Air Force. Bako addressed the Chief of Staff Third Fleet information Destroyer Squadrons Four and Five and Chief of Staff Second Fleet. The main Tokyo originator today was the Intelligence activity who sent five dispatches to the major commanders. The Direction Finder activity was very high with all stations sending in bearings including the Marshall Islands Stations which has been silent for the past four days.
    - COMBINED FLEET.-No further information as to whether or not Destroyer Squadron Three is in Hainan area but is believed to be still with Cruiser Division Seven in that area. There is still no evidence of any further movement from the Kure-Sasebo area. The Chief of Staff Combined Fleet originated several messages of general address. He has been fairly inactive as an originator lately. CinC. Second Fleet originated many messages to Third Fleet, Combined Air Force and Bako.
    - THIRD FLEET.-Still holding extensive communication with Baka, Sama South China Fleet and French Indo China Force. The use of WE addresses is increasing, those occurring today were: "DAIHATIFUTABUTAISANBOTEU" (in Taihoku) "KOROKUKITISIKI" "KIZUKEYAMASITABUTAI" (in care of RYUJO) "HEIZEUKAIGUNDAIGONREUSEU" There is nothing to indicate any movement of the Third Fleet as yet.
    - FOURTH FLEET.-CinC. Fourth Fleet frequently addressed dispatches to the defense forces in the Mandates. Jaluit addressed messages to the Commander Submarine Force and several submarine units. The Saipan Air Corps held communication with Jaluit and CinC. Fourth Fleet. The Civil Engineering Units at IMIEJI and ENIWETOK were heard from after being silent for weeks. Chitose Air Corps is in Saipan and Air Squadron Twenty-four is still operating in the Marshalls. No further information on the presence of Carrier Division Five in the Mandates.
    - AIR.-An air unit in the Takao area addressed a dispatch to the KORYU and SHOKAKU. Carriers are still located in home waters. No information of further movement of any Combined Air Force units to Hainan. SUBMARINES.-Commander Submarine Force still in Chichijima Area."

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: At 2000 hours, an unidentified aircraft is detected at high altitude over central Luzon by Iba radar. All Far East Air Force units are placed on alert.

    UNITED STATES: The USN Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Harold R. Stark, sends the following message to the commanders of the Asiatic Fleet, Admiral Thomas C. Hart, and Pacific Fleet, Admiral Husband E. Kimmel: "This dispatch is to be considered a war warning. Negotiations with Japan looking toward stabilization of conditions in the Pacific have ceased and an aggressive move by Japan is expected within the next few days. The number and equipment of Japanese troops and the organization of naval task forces indicates an amphibious expedition against either the Philippines, Thai or Kra Peninsula or possibly Borneo. Execute an appropriate defensive deployment preparatory to carrying out the tasks assigned in WPL46. Inform District and Army authorities. A similar warning is being sent by War Department. Spenavo inform British. Continental districts, Guam, Samoa directed take appropriate measures against sabotage."


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force photo reconnaissance covers Kiska, Amchitka and Attu Islands. A ship attacked in Holtz Bay on Attu Island yesterday is observed lower in the water and still burning.

    AUSTRALIA: In the early hours of the morning, a flight of heavy Japanese bombers drop a large number of bombs on RAAF Coomalie Creek Airfield in the Northern Territory. Most of them land in the bush adjacent to the airfield. Only two or three bombs hit the runway, but the holes are easily filled in after the raid.

    HONG KONG: Ten B-25s and 20+ P-40s of the USAAF Tenth Air Force's China Air Task Force, the largest CATF effort in China to date, hit shipping and harbor installations at Hong Kong, firing warehouses and claiming two freighters and numerous barges sunk; a large force of fighters intercept during the return trip but are driven off by the escort; the Americans claim several airplanes shot down.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, Japanese reinforcements reach Buna losing one destroyer during the night. A three-day lull begins as preparations are made for renewing the attack.
    Thirteen Zeke's bomb and strafe an Australian medical dressing station and a U.S. casualty clearing station at Soputa. Twenty two Australians and six Americans are killed.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-26s pound the Buna area, hitting buildings, the airfield, and other targets, as Allied ground forces prepare to renew attacks in the Buna-Gona area.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 8 B-24's from Canton in the Phoenix and Nukufetau bomb Mille Atoll.

    BURMA: Twenty-three B24's bomb Rangoon with excellent results; formation is opposed by intense AA fire and 20 enemy aircraft of which 6 are destroyed, as against 4 B-24's achieve excellent results; 15 enemy aircraft intercept, of which 4 are destroyed, 2 probably, and several damaged for the loss of 1 B24. Nine B25's with 8 P-51's as escort raid Insein engine sheds, scoring direct hits and starting fires; results excellent; of 7 intercepting enemy aircraft, l is destroyed.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Enemy installations on the Tran Ninh plateau in NW Indo-China raided by 6 P40s; 6 transport planes set afire.

    CHINA: According to the Chinese comq, Hwanshihshih, S of Tzeli is retaken by the Chinese. Three Japanese aircraft bomb area 25 mi. W of Changsha. Chinese report that the Japanese drop 'incendiary bombs inside Changteh.

    INDIAN OCEAN: SS Scotia (Norwegian tanker, 9,972 tons) sunk by sub at 3-00 S, 69-03 E.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 4 B-25's on sea sweeps attack docks and warehouses at the port of Swatow and hit a convoy of 9 vessels heading S toward Amoy; the B-25's claim 1 destroyer sunk and a destroyer and freighter damaged by direct hits. Lost is B-24J 42-73312.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS.: Mosigetta-Mawiarakaw-Motupena region along S shore of Empress Augusta Bay is target for 60 SBDs and 37 TBFs escorted by 8'P-391s, which drop over 40 tons of bombsand strafe the region; at least 25 buildings destroyed, am-munition.dump blown up, and 10-15 fires started. Nineteen B-24s drop quarter ton bombs on Bonis airfield with unreported results. Twenty-three B25s escorted by 24 fighters drop 34 tons of bombs on Buka, scoring 40 hits on runway; 4 planes damaged byr heavy AA fire. Five B-25s with 8 fighters as escort destroy several buildings and damage a pier in QueenCarola Harbor area, NW Buka, during low level bombing and strafing raid. No enemy air interception encountered during dayand only 1 F4U is lost to AA fire

    NEW GUINEA: Japanese cleared from coastal road 2 mi. of Song R. by Allied troops supported by tanks.Wewak and Boram heavily hit with light bombs by 63 B-25s escorted by 53 P-38s; targets also thoroughly strafed; 5 planes destroyed on the ground and others damaged, 6 barges sunk, AA positions and an AK hit, camp areas damaged by strafing; 2 B-25's fail to return. Dutch New Guinea villages, including Timoeka, effectively bombed and strafed by 5 RAAZ Beauforts,Lost are B-25D-5 "Impatient Virgin" 41-30046, B-25G 42-64889 and P-38H 42-66869. Medium bombers also bomb the town of Finschhafen. HQ 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group transfers from Sydney to Brisbane.

    USMC - Force landed at Nukufetau is SBD 38035.

    PACIFIC: From Glen Boren's diary: We changed Task Forces from 50.3 to 50.4. The USS Essex left us and the USS Monterey joined us. Admiral Sherman joined us and we were Flag Ship for a while. We received 7 more fighters today. One glided over the wires and took the barrier, flipping upside down. Pilot was cut up some, but otherwise O.K. One of the men came up to me and said, "I got the clock!" Almost before the pilot was out of the aircraft. The aircraft. was pushed over the side as too badly damaged to repair at sea. The in-dash clocks were highly prized trophies as they were fine instruments. Never got one myself, but I wanted one. After sunset, jap plans came within 8 miles of us and dropped flares, but did not find us. Four of our planes chased a jap betty and shot it down and had to land on the Princeton as our deck was fouled and it was getting dark.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 17 B-24s bomb Gia Lam, French Indochina. 17 B-25s blast the Hochih, China area, 6 bomb Phu Lang Thuong, French Indochina, and 8 pound warehouses at Lashio, Burma. 56 P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance over E Burma, N French Indochina, and vast areas of S China attack town areas, railroad targets, bridges and other targets of opportunity around Lampang, Thailand; Phu Binh, French Indochina; Pachai, Ishan, and Chefang, China; and Wanling, Hsenwi, and Kawnghka, Burma. A detachment of the 426th Night Fighter Squadron, Fourteenth AF, begins operating from Hsian, China with P-61s (squadron is based at Chengtu with a detachment at Kunming).

    CHINA: U.S. Major General Albert Wedemeyer, Commanding General, U.S. China Theater of Operations and Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, presents a plan to Chiang Kai-shek to furnish munitions to Chinese Communists. The proposal is rejected.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 P-47s fly close support strikes in the Pinwe area; 21 fighter-bombers destroy bridges at Inailong and Thegyaung and damage bridges at Ho-hko and Kawnghka; 60+ fighter-bombers attack personnel and supply areas at Kutkai, Kyungon, Kodaungbo, Mongmit, Datwin, Man Namsawk, Old Lashio, and Ugingyi. Transports fly 280+ sorties, carrying men and supplies to forward bases and frontline areas. A detachment of the 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 8th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, begins operating from Myitkyina, Burma with F-5s (squadron is based at Barrackpore, India); the 165th Liaison Squadron (Commando), 1st Air Commando Group, moves from Yazagyo, Burma to Asansol, India with UC-64s and L-5s; the 434th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 12th Bombardment Group (Medium), moves from Comilla to Fenny, India with B-25s.

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS (Twentieth Air Force): The USAAF Twentieth Air Force's XX Bomber Command flies Mission 18: 60 B-29 Superfortresses operating from the Calcutta, India area, are dispatched to bomb the Bangsue railroad yards at Bangkok; 55 bomb the target and three others hit individual targets. One aircraft is lost.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: Hostilities on Peleliu in the Palau Islands end. Approximately 13,600 Japanese have been killed on Angaur, Peleliu, and small islands off Peleliu; prisoners total about 400. The 81st Infantry Division and attached units have suffered over 3,275 casualties, including 542 killed. The reinforced 1st Marine Division's casualties total about 5,250 killed and 5,275 wounded.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 24 B-24s from Saipan escorted by 12 P-38s, hit Iwo Jima; 29 more B-24s, from Guam fly a second strike against the island. 25 B-24s from Angaur Airfield bomb Del Monte Airfield.

    MARIANA ISLANDS: At 0005 hours, two Japanese "Betty" bombers bombed and strafed Isley Field on Saipan destroying a B-29 Superfortress. At 1210 hours, 17 "Zeke" fighters staging through Iwo Jima, strafed Isley Field destroying two B-29s and damaging seven others. Virtually all of them are shot down by antiaircraft and intercepting fighters.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): 81 Mariana Islands-based B-29s fly against Tokyo; none of the B-29s bomb the primary targets, the Musashino and Nakajima plants, but 59 hit the secondary, the urban area and docks; 7 bomb Hamamatsu, a target of opportunity; while the mission is in progress 11 enemy airplanes attack Isley Field destroying or damaging several B-29s; AA and intercepting fighters down 10 aircraft.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The detachment of the 419th Night Fighter Squadron, XIII Fighter Command, operating from Noemfoor moves to Morotai with P-61s (squadron is based on Middleburg).

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces (FEAF) B-25s blast Namlea Airfield on Boeroe Island and Liang and Laha Dromes on Ambon Island. A variety of FEAF aircraft attack airfields, shipping, and targets of opportunity on Celebes Island, North Borneo, and in the Halmahera and the Ceram Islands areas.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: On Leyte, a battalion of 306th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division, leaves for operation against Mindoro. In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area, the 1st Battalion of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, on Kilay Ridge, learns from a patrol that help is coming however they undergo a strong Japanese counterattack from the east and its supply line to Consuegra is temporarily cut. In the XXIV Corps area, the 1st Battalion (-) of the 84th Infantry Regiment moves from Caridad to Damulaan to help the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division; attacks toward Albuera, clearing the Japanese from the bamboo thicket within the 32d Infantry Regiment's zone; 109 Japanese dead are counted. The 32d Infantry Regiment and 1st Battalion, 184th Infantry Regiment, establish defense perimeters and repel light infiltration attempts during the night. The Japanese begin operations to regain airfields. Corps has learned of a Japanese plan to capture airfields in the Burauen area and is taking countermeasures.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Malogo and Bacalod Airfields on Negros Island and Degos Aerodromes on Mindanao Island.
    Twenty five USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24s from Angaur Island bomb Del Monte Airfield on Mindanano Island.
    USN destroyers bombard Japanese positions at Ormoc Bay, Leyte; firing continues on 28 November.

    1945

     
  17. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1931
    CHINA: Japanese troops withdraw from Chinchow to await the adjournment of the League of Nations Council.

    1937
    JAPAN: Premier KONOYE Fumimaro again rejects third-party participation in the Sino-Japanese peace negotiations when peace terms are formulated.


    1939
    AUSTRALIA: The Government decides to send the 6th Division, Second Australian Imperial Force, overseas when their training is completed.

    1941
    CEYLON: Force "G," the British battleship HMS Prince of Wales (53) and destroyers HMS Electra (H 27) and Express (H 61), arrive at Colombo. These ships join the battlecruiser HMS Repulse (34) and destroyers HMS Encounter (H 10) and Jupiter (F 85) and will form the British Far East Fleet based at Singapore. The aircraft carrier HMS Indomitable (92) was scheduled to join them, but was damaged when she ran aground in Jamaica, West Indies, on 3 November while training.

    CHINA: U.S. passenger liner SS President Harrison, chartered for the purpose, sails from Shanghai, China, for the Philippine Islands, with the 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment and regimental staff embarked. "Stirring scenes of farewell," U.S. Consul Edwin F. Stanton reports to Secretary of State Cordell Hull, accompany the marines' departure. (The 2d Battalion left yesterday in the SS President Madison.)

    HAWAII: The USN's Task Force Eight (TF 8) (Vice Admiral William Halsey), comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise; the heavy cruisers USS Chester, Northampton and Salt Lake City; and the destroyers USS Balch, Benham, Craven, Dunlap, Ellet, Fanning, Gridley, Maury and McCall, departs Pearl Harbor on a mission to deliver 12 Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats, a detachment of Marine Fighting Squadron Two Hundred Eleven (VMF-211), to Wake Island.
    Halsey approves "Battle Order No. 1" that declares that Enterprise is operating "under war conditions." "Steady nerves and stout hearts," the carrier's captain concludes, "are needed now." Supporting PBY Catalina operations will be carried out from advanced bases at Wake and Midway.
    The Communication Intelligence Summary for 28 November states:
    "General.-Traffic volume normal. Communications to and from South China and between Mandates and Empire very heavy. No tactical traffic seen. As has been previously reported the suspected Radio Intelligence net is very active and is becoming more so.
    The TOKYO plotting activity addressed more messages to the Radio net than previously and most of these sent for information to the Major Commanders. Much traffic also was directed to NRE0 (the TOKYO D. F. Command) from all eight stations in the Mandates and OMINATO. This Command also originated messages of high precedence to the Major Fleet Commanders. This activity is interpreted to indicate that the Radio Intelligence net is operating at full strength upon U.S. Naval Communications and is getting results.
    TOKYO originators were active with messages of high precedence to the Commander in Chiefs of the Second and Third Fleets and Combined Air Force. The Navy Minister sent to Alnavs. The Chief of the Naval General Staff sent one to the Chief of Staffs of Combined Air Force, Combined Fleet, Fourth Fleet, Third Fleet, French IndoChina Force, Second Fleet and RNO PALAO. The BUAERO sent one to Chief of Staff Fourth Fleet info IMIESI and 11th Air Corps at SAIPAN. Combined Fleet.
    No indication of movement of any Combined Fleet units. Commander in Chief Second Fleet originated his usual number of dispatches to Third Fleet and Combined Air Force. The units paid particular attention to by the Commander in Chief Second Fleet were CARDIVS Five and Seven and DESRONS Two and Four and SUBRON Five.
    No traffic today from the TAKAO (CA).
    Third Fleet.-Little activity from Third Fleet units save for the Commander in Chief. The impression is growing that the First Base Force is not present with the bulk of the Third Fleet in SASEBO but it is not yet located elsewhere. The Army Commander in TAIHOKU is still holding communications with the commander in Chief Third Fleet.
    Two Third Fleet units arrived at BAKO and are apparently returning to KURE from BAKO.
    Fourth Fleet.-Bulk of Fourth Fleet still at TRUK. The Commander in Chief Fourth addressed message to the Sixth Base Force at JALUIT and the Fourth Base Force at TRUK. Yokohama Air Corps is at RUOTTO and WOTJE and held communications with AIRRON Twenty-Four and KAMOI.
    Sixth China.-SAMA sent several messages to shore addresses in the Empire. SAMA also addressed the OMURA AIR CORPS in several messages which went for information to SAIGON and TOKYO. TAKAO radio station addressed the Chiefs of Staff Combined Fleet, Second Fleet, the French Indo China Force and Combined Air Force. TAKAO Air Corps addressed SUKUGAWA Air Corps and YOKOSUKA Air Corps. A representative of a HAINAN office now at SAIGON originated several messages to the Naval Bases at SASEBO and KURE.
    The Commander in Chief China Fleet originated more traffic than usual and addressed his fleet collectively for information to the Commander in Chief Second and Commander in Chief Third Fleets.
    Submarines. Except for the mention of SUBRONS Five and Six in two dispatches there was no submarine activity today.

    JAPAN: The Foreign Ministry sends the following message to the Japanese Embassy in Washington, D.C.: "Well, you two Ambassadors have exerted superhuman efforts but, in spite of this, the United States has gone ahead and presented this humiliating proposal. This was quite unexpected and extremely regrettable. The Imperial Government can by no means use it as a basis for negotiations. Therefore, with a report of the views of the Imperial Government on this American proposal which I will send you in two or three days, the negotiations will be de facto ruptured. This is inevitable. However, I do not wish you to give the impression that the negotiations are broken off. Merely say to them that you are awaiting instructions and that, although the opinions of your Government are not yet clear to you, to your own way of thinking the Imperial Government has always made just claims and has borne great sacrifices for the sake of peace in the Pacific. Say that we have always demonstrated
    a long-suffering and conciliatory attitude, but that, on the other hand, the United States has been unbending, making it impossible for Japan to establish negotiations. Since things have come to this pass, I contacted the man you told me to in your #1180 and he said that under the present circumstances what you suggest is entirely unsuitable. From now on do the best you can."

    UNITED STATES: Secretary of State Cordell Hull again warns U.S. officials of an imminent Japanese attack.
    The Japanese Ambassador NOMURA Kichisaburo sends a message to Tokyo stating that headlines are appearing in the newspapers saying " Hull Hands Peace Plan to Japanese," and "America Scorns a Second Munich." The papers say that it is up to Japan either to accept the American proposal with its four principals, or face war, in which latter case the responsibility would be upon Japan."
    Headquarters Western Defense Command at the Presidio of San Francisco, California, issues a SECRET message to the Commanding Generals of the Northwest Sector Pacific Coastal Frontier; Northern California Sector Pacific Coastal Frontier; and Southern California Sector Pacific Coastal Frontier: "It appears that negotiations with Japan have failed....It is desired that Japan commit the first overt act.....take precautions....do not alarm civilians or disclose your intent..... In view of the above, the following measures are to be taken:
    (a).Harbor entrance control posted...24 hour manning...
    (b) One gun battery each harbor on continuous alert...
    c) Harbor defense ...co-operate with Naval district commands
    (d) Protection against sabotage and other subversive activities has been intensified. Take the following measures:
    (a) Complete sector plans under Rainbow 5...
    (b) Designate two Reserve battalions and motor transport to Commanding General, Ninth Corps Area..........
    (c) Have Rainbow 5 reconnaissance put into effect...
    (d) Keep personnel on duty at headquarters at all times....
    (e) Take precautions against sabotage or subversive activity....Limit distribution of this document to minimum essential officers.

    WAKE ISLAND: Seaplane tender USS Wright (AV-1), arrives with the ground echelon of Marine Aircraft Group Twenty One (MAG-21) to establish an advance aviation base.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A B-24 photographs a beached freighter at Holtz Bay, Attu Island and draws no antiaircraft fire during ten runs over the bay, and flies reconnaissance over Kiska Island.

    (CBI) THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Tenth Air Force): CHINA AIR TASK FORCE (CATF): In China, the detachment of the 11th Bombardment Squadron, 341st BG (Medium), operating from Nanning with B-25's, returns to base at Kunming (another detachment is operating from Karachi, India).

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-26s bomb the airfields at Lae and Buna; elements of the 126th Infantry Regiment, US 32d Infantry Division arrive on the Sanananda front from Wairopi.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The 14,125 ton USN cargo ship USS Alchiba is damaged by Japanese midget submarine Ha.10 (from submarine HIJMS I-16 ) while she is anchored 3,000 yards northeast of Lunga Point, Guadalcanal. Her hold is loaded with drums of gasoline and ammunition, and the resulting explosion shoots flames 150 feet in the air. The commanding officer orders the ship to get underway to run her up on the beach and this action undoubtedly saves the ship. Hungry flames raged in the ship for over five days before weary fire fighting parties finally bring them under control. This leaves only four undamaged cargo ships in the South Pacific Force.

    THAILAND: In the first USAAF air raid on Thailand, nine Tenth Air Force B-24s fly 2,760 miles from Gaya, India, to bomb Bangkok.

    USA: The first production Ford-built B-24 Liberator rolls off the assembly line at Ford's massive Willow Run plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan. In February 1942, the last Ford automobile rolled off the assembly line for the duration of the war, and soon afterward the Willow Run plant was completed.
    Built specifically for Ford's war production, Willow Run is the largest factory in the world. Using the type of assembly line production that has made Ford an industrial giant, Ford hopes to produce 500 B-24s a month. After a gradual start, that figure is reached in time for the Allied invasion of Western Europe, and by July 1944, the Willow Plant is producing one B-24 every hour. By the end of the war, the 43,000 men and women who work at Ford's Willow Run plant have produced over 8,500 bombers, which unquestionably has a significant impact on the course of the war.
    The Air Forces Proving Ground Command at Eglin Field, Valpariso, Florida, is redesignated Army Air Forces Proving Ground Command.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 11 B-24's from Nanumea hit Nauru. The 45th Fighter Squadron, 15th Fighter Group, transfers from Baker to Nanumea with P-40N's.

    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, B-24's heavily damage the Botataung docks at Rangoon; the B-24's claim 4 interceptors shot down; B-25's pound Sagaing.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 8 P-40's bomb and strafe the barracks area and village on the W bank of the Salween River near Litsaoho; 8 P-40's drop ammunition to besieged Chinese troops at Changte.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Six USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-40s strafe the town area and airfield at Luang Prabang and hit the radio building, barracks, and tower at Tran Ninh.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: Tarawa Atoll is completely secured. No Japanese are found on the small islet of Naa on the northern tip of the atoll. Marine casualties on Tarawa total 3,301. Japanese losses are estimated to be 4,690 killed, 17 captured, and 129 Koreans taken prisoner

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomons , 6 B-25's bomb and strafe the Mutupina Point area; fighters strafe Tinputs Harbor, barges at Tonolai, and targets of opportunity along the W coast.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): Nearly 50 B-24's bomb airfields at Wewak and Boram, and 40+ B-25's, B-26's, and A-20's hit villages on the Huon Peninsula and tracks in the Finschhafen area.

    IRAN: U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Josef Stalin meet in Teheran for a series of talks on wartime strategy and post-war planning. This meeting is coded EUREKA.
    This is the first time the three leaders of the Allied forces meet with each other to negotiate war plans. The Big Three announce that they have coordinated their war plans and reach complete agreement on the scope and planning of military operations. The Western Allies detail the invasion of Normandy and the supporting invasion of southern France and the Soviets coordinate the timing of their offensive against Germany.
    Premier Stalin again affirms his promise to enter the war against Japan once the war in Europe is over. Plans for the proposed United Nations are also discussed during the conference. On 1 December the leaders issue a declaration pledging economic aid to Iran during and after the war and divided occupation duties. Soviet troops guard the region north of Teheran, British forces occupy southern Iran, and U.S. units patrol the supply routes.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 1 B-24 photographs and bombs the Matsuwa Island shore area in the Kurile Islands.

    CHINA: The Japanese 11th Army, acting independently and against orders, drives across the Kwangsi-Kweichow border although it has been ordered to halt at the border.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In French Indochina, 17 B-24s, escorted by 12 P-51s, bomb Gia Lam and 6 B-25s hit a railroad bridge at Phu Lang Thuong. In Burma, 3 B-25s blast 6 warehouses at Hsenwi, 3 bomb Wan Lai- Kam, 1 hits Kutkai, and 4 attack buildings in the Wanling and Chefang, China areas. 60+ P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance over wide areas of E Burma and S China hit troops, bridges, horses, and other targets of opportunity at many locations.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) area, the Chinese 38th Division maintains pressure on the main northern defenses of Bhamo with the 114th Regiment; the 113th Regiment has the mission of entering the city but has been unable to do so.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 39 P-47s support ground forces in the Pinwe and Bhamo areas; supply and personnel concentrations and targets of opportunity at Nwegyo, Kutkai, the Meza area, Mankang, Manai, Nawnglok, Nawnglong, Loimawk, Man Myeng, Mong Wi and Kungmong are attacked by about 80 fighter-bombers; 16 hit targets of opportunity along the Maymyo- Bawgyo rail line. Transports fly 317 sorties to forward areas. HQ 4th Combat Cargo Group and the 13th Combat Cargo Squadron arrive at Sylhet, India from the US with C-46s.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: In the Palau Islands, elements of the 81st Infantry Division begin to clear Kayangel Atoll, north of Kossol Passage. In the air, three USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators from Angaur Island bomb the radio station on Arakabesan Island.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 21 Saipan based B-24s bomb the airfield on Iwo Jima; 3 others, flying an armed reconnaissance mission, bomb Marcus. During the night of 28/29 Nov a B-24 on a snooper mission hits Iwo Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The 2d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 22d BG (Heavy), moves from Leyte to Angaur Airfield Island with B-24s; the 35th Fighter Squadron, 8th FG, that has been operating from Morotai Island, joins the ground echelon at Dulag, Leyte Island with P-38s.

    EAST INDIES: Small attacks by USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers are launched against airfields, shipping, and targets of opportunity over wide areas in the Halmahera and Timor Islands area.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the Japanese try to recover Kilay Ridge, during the night of 28/29 November, moving onto it in strength and isolating Company C, 34th Infantry Regiment, on the southwestern end. The 12th Cavalry Regiment, mopping up in the Mt Badian-Hill 2348 region, about 5 miles NE of Kananga, inches westward from this time until 9 December. In the XXIV Corps area, the 32d Infantry Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division, now greatly weakened, is to be withdrawn to reserve while the 184th and 17th Infantry Regiments continue the battle for Shoestring Ridge.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Degos and Matina Aerodromes on Mindanao Island. Small attacks by B-24s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers are launched against airfields, shipping, and targets of opportunity over wide areas including the central Philippines.
    During the night of 28/29 November, three Japanese Army transports attempt to drop 45 paratroopers on Tacloban Airfield on Leyte where their mission is to disrupt flight operations. One of the aircraft is shot down by antiaircraft fire and the other two crash near Dulag Airfield.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Camotes Sea, Japanese submarine HIJMS I-46 is sunk about 16 nautical miles S of Ormoc, Leyte, Philippine Islands, in position 10.48N, 124.35E, by the USN destroyers USS Saufley, Waller, Pringle, and Renshaw

    1945

     
  18. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1941

    CHINA: USN river gunboats USS Luzon (PR-7) and USS Oahu (PR-6) depart Shanghai for Manila, Philippine Islands. USS Oahu (PR-6) is the sistership of river gunboat USS Panay (PR-5), which had been bombed and sunk by Japanese naval aircraft near Nanking, China, on 12 December 1937.


    HAWAII: Communication Intelligence Summary, 29 November 1941: General.-Traffic volume above normal, The traffic to South China still very high. Automatic transmissions was attempted on the Tokyo-Takao (Formosa) circuit but was a failure and traffic sent by hand. A good share of today's traffic is made up of messages of an intelligence nature. Tokyo Intelligence sent eleven messages during the day to Major Commanders both ashore and afloat, while the radio intelligence activity at Tokyo sent four long messages to the Major Commanders. In addition to the stations normally reporting to Tokyo, radio Yokosuka sent in reports. This station had not previously been seen to submit reports. The Direction Finder Net controlled directly by Tokyo was up during the night with much activity. One message for Jaluit Radio Direction Finder Station included Commander Submarines for information. The Navy Minister originated his usual two AlNavs and the Naval General Staff addressed Commanders Se
    cond Fleet Third Fleet, Combined Ail Force and the South China Units. The unit which has been addressed as the "103rd Air Group" originated one dispatch today whose address was composed entirely of enciphered calls. It is apparent that he has no Navy call list. One address was "JUITIKOUKUUKANTAI" "11th AIR *FLEET*". Since this has appeared before it is evident that the use of KANTAI is intentional making the existence of an air fleet positive. Its composition is unknown.
    Combined Fleet:-The arrival of Air Squadron Seven in Takao area is confirmed. The presence of Cruiser Division Four in that area is not confirmed nor denied. The dispatches today indicate that the following units are under the immediate command of CinC. Second Fleet: CARDIV THREE, DESRON TWO, SUBRON FIVE, DESRON FOUR, SUBRON SIX, THIRD FLEET CRUDIV FIVE, FRENCH INDO CHINA FORCE, CRUDIV SEVEN
    Associated with Third Fleet are two Battleships but their assignment is not yet definite. Aside from messages which were addressed to Third Fleet, China and South China Fleets, Combined Air Force and the Naval General Staff, Commander in Chief Second Fleet was mainly occupied with the units listed above. Only one message from Commander in Chief Combined Fleet was seen. This was addressed to YOKOSUKA, Combined Air Force, CRUDIV Four and BUMILAFF. The HIYEI sent one message to Chief of Staff Third Fleet.
    Third Fleet.-Commander in Chief Third Fleet sent one message to Comdesron Five, Number Two Base Force, Number One Base Force, Defense Division One and Comdesron Two and Four. He held extensive communications with the Commander in Chief Second Fleet and BAKO. Two more units of Third Fleet made movement reports.
    Fourth Fleet.--Relatively inactive today. Sent one message to Commander in Chief Second Fleet, Commander in Chief Third Fleet and Combined Air Force. He is still in TRUK area.
    Submarines.- Traffic for Commander Submarine Force was routed through SAIPAN today. He was at CHICHIJIMA yesterday.
    South China.-CRUDIV Seven now in SAMA made a movement report but direction was not indicated. The French Indo China Force Commander addressed several messages to Second and Third Fleets as well as TOKYO. The Commander in Chief China Fleet was active in addressing the South China Naval Bases and the South China Fleets, all for information to Commander in Chief Second Fleet.

    JAPAN: A liaison conference among the Service Chiefs and Cabinet of the Japanese Government decides that the final proposal from the U.S. dated 26 November is unacceptable. Their alternative is war and their decision is prepared for an Imperial Conference, with the Emperor, which is scheduled for December.
    Premier General TOJO Hideki says American and British exploitation of Asiatic peoples must be purged with vengeance stating, "Nothing can be permitted to interfere with this sphere because this sphere was decreed by Providence."

    UNITED STATES: Secretary of State Cordell Hull warns the British Ambassador Lord Halifax Britain of an impending Japanese attack.
    The Australian Minister to the U.S., Richard G. Casey, sends a message to the Australian government reporting that a Japanese task force of five divisions is assembled for a southward advance.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A B-24 over Holtz Bay, Attu Island, reports the vessel bombed and damaged on 26 November as still sinking; a B-26 flies an uneventful reconnaissance over the south shore of Kiska Island.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: B-25s of the USAAF Tenth Air Forces China Air Task Force bomb Hongay and Campho on the coast.

    SOUTH PACIFIC AREA (SOPAC, Joint Chiefs of Staff): A detachment of the 33d Troop Carrier Squadron, 374th Troop Carrier Group, ceases operating from New Caledonia (another detachment is operating from Cairns, Australia; the squadron is enroute from the US to Australia).

    NEW GUINEA: Colonel Yazawa Kiyomi and part of the Japanese force that has withdrawn along the west bank of the Kumusi River to positions north of Gona reach Giruwa from there by barge. Australian troops attack in the Gona area attack from the south and east but are halted by determined Japanese troops.
    In New Papua Guinea, B-17s, P-40s, and A-20s attack the Gona area while B-25s and a single A-20 bomb the airfield at Lae.

    NEW HEBRIDES ISLANDS: Following the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 12-15 November, all plans to recapture that island were abandoned by the Japanese, and all their efforts were directed instead toward making its final capture by the Americans as expensive as possible. For a period of approximately three weeks, only air raids and the appearance of minor naval vessels broke the lull for U.S. forces. However, towards the end of November, Japanese shipping in the Shortland Islands, Solomon Islands, area increases as supplies are loaded upon fast transports, and it becomes apparent that a Japanese move in force to supply their the Guadalcanal garrison is imminent.
    In order to deny the Japanese the much needed food, ammunition and technical personnel, the USN established Task Force 67 is formed on 27 November at Espirtu Santo Island to intercept the rejuvenated "Tokyo Express" before it could effect a landing.
    TF 67, under the command of Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright, is composed of the heavy cruisers USS Minneapolis, New Orleans, Northampton and Pensacola, light cruiser USS Honolulu, and destroyers USS Drayton, Fletcher, Lamson, Larder, Maury and Perkins. At about 2300 hours, TF 67 got underway to intercept the Japanese landing which was expected to take place at Tassafaronga.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s intercept a force of four troop carrying destroyers proceeding through Vitiaz Strait between New Britain Island and New Guinea without air cover; the B-17s damage the Japanese destroyers HIJMS Shiratsuyu and Makigumo and cause the others to turn back, thus preventing reinforcement of Gona with fresh troops from Rabaul on New Britain Island.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the 3d Battalion, 147th Infantry Regiment, elements of the 246th Field Artillery Battalion, part of the Marine 9th Defense Battalion, and additional Seabees are landed in the Koli Point area, where an airfield, Carney, is to be constructed; the Aola Bay area has been rejected as unsuitable for an airfield site.
    During the night of 29/30 November, Japanese Destroyer Squadron Two, consisting of eight destroyers under the command of Rear Admiral Tanaka Raizo, departed Buin on the southern coast of Bougainville Island en route to Guadalcanal. The destroyers divided into two forces were: Strike Force consisted of HIJMS Naganami and Takanami; Transport Force consisted of HIJMS Kagero, Kawakaze, Kuroshio, Makinami, Oyahio and Suzukaze.
    Aircraft from Henderson Field, Guadalcanal sink Japanese cargo ships SS Azusa Maru and Kiku Maru, in Wickham Anchorage, New Georgia Island.

    UNITED STATES: Coffee joins the list of items rationed. Despite record coffee production in Latin American countries, the growing demand for the bean from both military and civilian sources, and the demands placed on shipping, which is needed for other purposes, required the limiting of its availability.
    In a major reorganization, all Bombardment Squadrons assigned to the USAAF Antisubmarine Command are redesignated Antisubmarine Squadrons.
    Lieutenant Colonel Boyd D. "Buzz" Wagner, America's first WWII fighter ace, is killed in a P-40 accident 25 miles north of Eglin Field, Valpariso, Florida. In December 1941, Lieutenant Wagner was assigned to the 17th Pursuit Squadron in the Philippines and shot down five Japanese aircraft in four days. He was evacuated to Australia in January 1942 and then went to New Guinea in April 1942 with two P-39 squadrons.
    On 30 April, he was credited with three Japanese fighters bringing his total to eight. By late summer, he had returned to the U.S. in a combat-training assignment. He is on a routine flight from Eglin Field to Maxwell Field, Montgomery, Alabama when his aircraft crashes.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 2 B-25's hit the airfield, town area, and warehouse section at Swatow, 2 bomb the power station and nearby targets of opportunity at Amoy, and 2 attack barges in nearby coastal areas; 24 P-40's drop food and ammunition to Chinese troops at Changte, strafe a camp in the Hsutu Lake area, damage a vessel in Tien-hsin Lake and attack numerous small craft in channels between Hsutu and Tungting Lakes and between Tsowshih and Hofuh.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 18 B-25's, with fighter cover, attack Tinputs Harbor and targets of opportunity in the area from Numa Numa to Kieta; 21 B-24's pound Kieta; P-39's join USN dive bombers in a strike on the Mosigetta warehouse area while a fighter patrol attacks Gazelle Harbor and gun positions S of Torokina Plantation.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force):
    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: Task Group 74.2, the Australian destroyers HMAS Arunta and Warramunga and the USN destroyers USS Helm and Ralph Talbot, shell Japanese positions at Gasmata on New Britain Island.
    Thirty five USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s and B-26s bomb Cape Gloucester on New Britain Island. 35 B-25's and B-26's bomb Cape Gloucester;
    6 B-24's bomb a barracks at Manokwari.

    NEW GUINEA: As the Australians advance from Finschhafen, Northeast New Guinea, they capture Bonga, former enemy supply base, and Gusika and then press on towards Wareo. Farther north Allied warships shell Sio.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Solomon Sea, the USN destroyer USS Perkins is sunk shortly before 0200 hours by the Australian troopship HMAT Duntroon which rams Perkins on the portside, amidships. Splitting in two, Perkins goes down 1.7 nautical miles off the coast of Papua New Guinea about 171 nautical miles E of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Four crewmen are lost.
    USN submarine USS Bonefish sinks the 4,625 ton Surabaya-bound Japanese army cargo ship SS Suez Maru in the Java Sea off Kangean Island, north of Bali, about 177 nautical miles E of Surabaya, Java, Netherlands East Indies, in position 6.57S, 115.42E.
    There are 916 men aboard the ship: in two holds, 422 sick British (including 221 RAF servicemen) and 127 sick Dutch prisoners, including up to 20 stretcher cases, are accommodated; 205 Japanese patients fill the other two holds. After being hit by the torpedo, the ship starts to list as water pours into the holds drowning hundreds.
    Hundreds more, Allied and Japanese, manage to escape the holds and are struggling in the water. The Japanese escort mine sweeper W-12, starts to pick up Japanese survivors leaving the Allied captives behind. Between 200 and 250 men are floating in the sea. The minesweeper then makes several slow circles around the survivors and minutes later machine-gun and rifle fire are directed towards the defenseless swimmers. Empty rafts and lifeboats are then rammed and sunk. The minesweeper then picks up speed and speeds off towards Batavia. They had rescued 93 Japanese soldiers and crewmen and 205 Japanese sick patients; 69 Japanese had died during the attack.
    Back at the site of the sinking only floating wreckage and an oil spill was all that was left of the Suez Maru. Of the 546 British and Dutch prisoners, there is only one survivor, a British soldier who is picked up 24-hours later by the Australian minesweeper HMAS Ballarat.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The 1st Marine Parachute Battalion is landed before dawn about 6 miles E of Cape Torokina from LCVPs and LCMs, covered by two LCI(G) and a motor torpedo boat; heavy Japanese opposition at daybreak, however, compels the evacuation of the marines.
    Destroyer USS Fullam aided by F4U Corsairs, silences enemy artillery, mortar and sniper fire, and thus allows the successful extraction of the beleaguered marines.
    On Bougainville, work is begun on an airstrip, called Piva Uncle, near the Piva River.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 3 B-24s bomb Kashiwabara on Paramushiru. B-25s call off a shipping sweep due to weather.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-25s bomb Ninh Binh, French Indochina and 8 hit Lashio and 3 attack Hsenwi, Burma. 20 P-40s, P-38s and P-51s hit targets of opportunity in the Chefang, China area. 23 P-38s and P-51s attack bridges, horses, shipping, and rail traffic around Hochih and Nanning, China; Quang Yen, French Indochina; and Hsenwi, Kawnghka, and Namhkai, Burma.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 50+ fighter-bombers fly close support strikes in the battle areas around Bhamo and Pinwe; bridges at Tonbo, Pauktaw, Man Loi, Meza, Bon Chaung, and at 2 unnamed points in N Burma are pounded by 60+ fighter-bombers; 8 others bomb supplies, personnel and ammunition stores at Tigyaing. 323 transport sorties are flown to forward areas. The 1st Combat Cargo Squadron, 1st Combat Cargo Group, moves from Sylhet to Tulihal, India with C-47s; the 490th Bombardment Squadron (Medium), 341st Bombardment Group (Medium), moves from Moran, India to Warazup, Burma with B-25s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 18 B-24s from Guam bomb Iwo Jima. 4 P-47s from Saipan strafe Pagan.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): 24 Mariana Islands-based B-29s strike the Tokyo dock and industrial area during the night of 29/30 Nov; 2 B-29s bomb the last resort targets of Yokohama and Numazu.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Kendari Airfield on Celebes Island. B-24s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers fly several light raids against Halmahera Island airfields and against shipping and other targets of opportunity in the Ceram Island area, northern Celebes Island, and northern Borneo.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army’s X Corps area on Leyte, the Japanese continue attacks on Kilay Ridge, but the 1st Battalion of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, succeeds in relieving Company C. An urgent request for reinforcements, 2d Battalion of 528th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, moves forward, Company G, the first to arrive, immediately reinforcing Company C. In the XXIV Corps area, elements of the 184th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, recover some ground at the bamboo thicket but are unable to clear the Japanese from the thicket and they repel three heavy Japanese counterattacks.
    In Leyte Gulf, Japanese kamikazes crash the battleship USS Maryland between turrets Nos. 1 and 2 killing 31 sailors but the ships remained on station. Also hit are the destroyers USS Saufley killing one sailor and Aulick killing 31.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Matina Aerodrome on Mindanao Island while A-20s and P-47s hit the airfield at Pangsagan. B-24s, with fighter cover, bomb Puerto Princesa Airfield on Palawan Island. B-25s and P-47s attack Japanese shipping near Ormoc Bay sinking a submarine chaser. P-40s and P-47s sink an army cargo ship off Camotes Island, and a cargo ship Shinsho Maru off Ormoc. B-25s, and fighter-bombers fly several light raids against targets of opportunity in the Philippine Islands.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Archerfish torpedoes and sinks the 68,059 ton Japanese aircraft carrier HIJMS Shinano about 190 nautical miles S of Nagoya, Japan, in position 32.00N, 137.00E. This was the carrier’s maiden voyage and there were 2515 sailors, 300 shipyard workers and 40 civilian employees aboard. She had sailed from Yokosuka yesterday with three destroyers en route to Kure for fitting out. Unfortunately for those aboard, her watertight compartmentation not yet being installed Archerfish fired six torpedoes and four hit on the starboard side and Shinano becomes the largest warship ever lost in combat when she sank at 1055 hours. The ship had been at see for a total of 17 hours. Of the 2,515 men aboard, 1,435 are lost and 1,080 are rescued.
    USN submarine USS Scabbardfish sinks the Japanese submarine HIJMS I-365 with one torpedo about 84 nautical miles SE of Tokyo, Japan, in position 34.44N, 141.01E. Scabbardfish rescues one survivor.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, Australian troops of the 9th Battalion, 7th Brigade, 3rd Division, attack Japanese positions on Little George Hill about 9 miles NNE of the Torokina perimeter and takes the hill in less than 30 minutes. The Japanese counter-attack in the evening but are driven off.

    1945

     
  19. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm] 6,810

    1938
    JAPAN: The Japanese Emperor, Advisory Council, Army, Navy, and Privy Council are reported to have decided on a policy regarding "new order in East; Asia."

    1940

    CHINA: Japan has formally recognised China's breakaway reformed Kuomintang government and its premier, Wang Ching-wei, after last minute secret peace talks with Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek's Kuomintang government in Chungking broke down. Chungking is now expected to go on a diplomatic offensive against what it calls Wang Ching-wei's puppet government and warn foreign governments that it will break off relations with any power that recognises the new regime.


    1941
    FIJI ISLANDS: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-10 launches a “Glen” seaplane (Kugisho E14Y1, Navy Type 0 Small Reconnaissance Seaplane) to fly a reconnaissance mission over Suva Bay, Viti Levu Island.

    HAWAII: Communication Intelligence Summary, November 30, 1941: "General.-Traffic volume less than for past few days. Today's traffic consisted largely of dispatches bearing old dates, some as far back as 26 November. No reason can be given for the retransmission of these messages unless the high volume of traffic for past few days has prevented the repetition of dispatches. The number of dispatches originated on the 30th is very small. The only tactical circuit heard today was one with Akagi and several marus. The TOKYO Intelligence activity originated two WIWI dispatches to Major Fleet Commanders. One urgent dispatch was sent by NGS to Chiefs of Staff Combined, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Fleets, Combined Air Force; Submarine Force and China Fleets.
    - Combined Fleet.-The Chiefs of Staff of the Combined Fleet and First Fleet are in KURE. In the same message the Chief of Staff Second Fleet was nor at any location. Other traffic indications are that he is at sea. Commander in Chief Second Fleet sent one to his usual addressees of the Third Fleet and Combined Air Force but also included Kongo and Hiyei, which places them as members of his Task Force. The Commander in Chief Second Fleet is no longer adding PALAO activities and has not for past two days. The RNO PALAO today addressed two messages to TAIWAN GUNSIREIBU (TAIWAN Army Headquarters) .
    - Third Fleet.-Commander in Chief Third Fleet addressed two messages to COMDESRON Two, Four and Five; COMCRUDIV Five; First and Second Base Forces and Defense Division One for information to Commander in Chief Second Fleet. No information obtained as to the location of the Commander in Chief Third Fleet, which gives the strong impression that he is underway.
    - Fourth Fleet.-Believed to be still in TRUK area. D. F. activity in Marshalls a little greater today than normal. JALUIT addressed Commander Submarine Force and AIRRON 24 in one dispatch. The continued association of JALUIT and Commander Submarine Force plus his known progress from the Empire to CHICHIJIMA to SAIPAN makes his destination obviously the Marshalls. Since one of his large units (SITI4) arrived in the Marshalls some time ago this unit cannot agree with Com 16 that there is not a submarine concentration in that area. Every evidence points to a concentration of not only the small Fourth Fleet submarines there but also a good portion of the Fleet submarines of the Submarine Force. AIRRON 24 plus Yokohama Air Corps presence in that area points to intended air-submarine operations from the Marshalls. Also the presence of a unit of plane guard destroyers indicates the presence of at least one carrier in the Mandates although this has not been confirmed.
    - South China.-BAKO active with dispatches to Second and Third Fleets. Combined Air Force and SAMA. Commander in Chief China Fleet becoming more and more active as an originator with dispatches to the Task Force. He made a movement report with the South China Fleet as an information addressee. The Staff Communication Officer of the South China Fleet was addressed at Shanghai today."

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the South China Sea, river gunboats USS Luzon (PR-7) and Oahu (PR-6) rendezvous with submarine rescue vessel USS Pigeon (ASR-6) and minesweeper USS Finch (AM-9); they will remain in company until 3 December.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Lieutenant General Douglas MacArthur, Commanding General U.S. Army Forces Far East, orders Fort Mills on Corregidor Island put on full alert.
    U.S. passenger liner SS President Madison arrives at Olongapo and disembarks the 2d Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment. The ship will then proceed on to Singapore.

    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt is tonight hurrying back to Washington by car and private train from Warm Springs, Georgia, where his brief holiday has been interrupted by the grave situation in the Pacific. It was only yesterday that he left Washington, saying that the policy of the United States towards Japan was one of "infinite patience." Three days ago Roosevelt delivered a ten-point note of final terms to the Japanese, after talks with Tokyo's special envoy, KURUSU Saburu, had foundered. At the same time a Japanese fleet with five divisions of troops on board was reported sailing south of Formosa. A cabinet meeting on 28 November agreed that these and other Japanese troop movements posted a "terrific" threat to the British, Dutch and Americans in the Far East. Roosevelt is aware of the danger of a surprise attack. He asks top advisers "how we should manoeuvre them into firing the first shot." In an informal Thanksgiving speech he warned his friends that by next year American boys might be fighting "for the defence of American institutions. " More news of Tokyo's troop movements force Roosevelt to hurry back to the White House.
    The following message is sent from the Chief of Naval Operations to the Commanders-in- Chief of the Asiatic and Pacific Fleets: "Indications that Japan about to attack points on Kra Isthmus by overseas expedition. In order to ascertain destination this expedition and for security our position in the Philippines desire you cover by air the line Manila-Camranh Bay on three days commencing upon receipt this dispatch. Instruct planes to observe only. They must not approach so as to appear to be attacking but must defend themselves if attacked. Understand British air forces will search arc 180 miles from Tedta Bharu and will move troops to line across Kra Isthmus near Singora. If expedition is approaching Thailand inform MacArthur. British mission here informed."

    UNITED STATES: The Army General Headquarters Maneuvers in North and South Carolina that began on 15 November conclude.


    1942
    ANDAMAN ISLANDS: B-24s of the USAAF Tenth Air Forces India Air Task Force attack shipping at Port Blair, claiming damage to one vessel by near misses; this strike begins a series of raids on this water approach to Burma. The Andaman Islands are located in the eastern part of the Bay of Bengal; Port Blair is located about 472 nautical miles (874 kilometers) west-southwest of Bangkok, Thailand.

    BURMA: The British 123rd Brigade's advance reaches Bawli Bazar in the Arakan Valley. The weather, which is normally clear during November, has not cooperated thus making the advance extremely difficult.

    INDIA: The 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Tenth AF, moves from Karachi to Chakulia, India with F-4s (a flight is operating from Kunming, China).

    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): A B-24 flies reconnaissance over Semichi and Attu ; other flights are prevented by weather.

    JAPAN: The German tanker SS Uckermark, the former supply ship SS Altmark that had replenished the German armored ship Admiral Graf Spee, is at anchor at Yokohama when a huge explosions rips the vessel apart while the crew is having lunch. The cause of the explosion is thought to be a spark from tools used by a repair gang working near the fuel tanks. Forty-three crewmen from the Uckermark die. Anchored nearby and also sunk by the explosion is the Australian freighter SS Nankin and the German
    auxiliary cruiser HK Thor (Ship 10 also known as Raider E by the British) which had captured the Nankin on 5 October while she en route from Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia, to Colombo, Ceylon. During her two cruises, HK Thor had sunk or captured 20 ships totaling 152,125 tons.

    NEW GUINEA: U.S. Lieutenant General Eichelberger, Commanding General I Corps, flies from Australia to Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. The Australian 21st Brigade, Maroubra Force, having rested and
    reorganized after action in the Owen Stanley Range, takes over the attack on the Gona front, relieving the Australian 25th Brigade. In the Sanananda sector, the left flank elements of the 126th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, establish a block behind the Japanese on the Soputa-Sanananda trail, but a frontal attacks along the trail in the center and flanking attacks on the right make little headway. The Urbana and Warren Forces each make concerted attacks but gain little ground. The
    Urbana Force fails in three attempts to take Buna Village; elements protecting the flank and rear seize a crossing over Siwori Creek and the outpost region between there and Buna Creek, but are unable to clear Coconut Grove or advance beyond the Triangle. Warren Force, attacking toward Cape Endaiadere on the right and the northeastern edge of New Strip on the left, encounters the Japanese main line of resistance in Duropa Plantation and is unable to breach it. Bren gun carriers that are to have spearheaded assault in this sector fail to arrive.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s and B- 26s attack the airfield, AA positions, and defenses in the Buna area.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Arafura Sea between Australia and New Guinea, Australian Beaufighters drive off 14 Japanese aircraft that were attack the Australian minesweepers HMAS Armidale and Castlemaine.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: During the night of 30 November/1 December, the BATTLE OF TASSAFARONGA is fought. In an attempt to resupply the Japanese troops on Guadalcanal, the Japanese Navy has devised a scheme of loading gasoline and oil drums with food, medicine and whatever else would be needed, chaining the drums together and dump them overboard. The chain would be brought ashore by ships boat and the drums would be dragged ashore by the Army.
    Today, eight destroyers under Rear Admiral Tanaka Raizo, six of them carrying 440 drums, set sail from the Shortland Islands. The eight destroyers are HIJMS Kagero, Kawakaze, Kuroshio, Makinami, Naganami, Oyashio, Suzukaze and Takanami. The USN has been warned by an Australian coastwatcher on Bougainville and sends Task Group 67.2 under Rear Admiral Carleton H. Wright to intercept and sink the Japanese force.
    TG 67.2 consists of the heavy cruisers USS Minneapolis, New Orleans, Northampton and Pensacola; the light cruiser USS Honolulu; and the destroyers USS Drayton, Flethcer, Lamson, Lardner, Maury and Perkins. The USN ships surprise the Japanese off Tassafaronga Point, Guadalcanal.
    The Japanese press on to jettison the drums to sustain the troops while Long Lance torpedoes launched from destroyers HIJMS Kagero, Kawakaze, Kuroshio, Naganami and Oyashio wreak havoc
    on the USN's heavy cruisers: USS Minneapolis is hit by two torpedoes, one on the port bow, the other in her number two fireroom, causing loss of power and severe damage: her bow is gone back to the chain pipes, her port side badly ruptured, and two firerooms open to the sea; USS New Orleans next astern of USS Minneapolis, is forced to sheer away to avoid collision, and runs into the track of a torpedo which rips off her bow.
    Bumping down the ship's port side, the severed bow punches several holes in the hull. A fifth of her length gone, the ship slows to 2 knots; the next ship in line, USS PENSACOLA, turns left to prevent
    collision with the two damaged ships ahead of her and silhouetted by the burning American cruisers, she came in the Japanese line of fire. A torpedo hits her below the mainmast on the portside. Her engine room floods, three gun turrets go out of commission, and her oil tanks rupture to make a soaked torch of her mast.
    The next ship in line is USS Honolulu but she escapes the trap but the last ship in the column, USS
    Northampton, takes two torpedoes that tore a huge hole in her port side, ripping away decks and bulkheads. Flaming diesel oil sprays over the ship, she takes on water rapidly and begins to list and the abandon ship order is given three hours later and the ship sinks about 35 nautical miles NNW of Henderson Field, Guadalcanal.
    With the sinking of Northampton, the USN has only 13 heavy cruisers in commission. The only Japanese casualty is the destroyer HIJMS Takanami which is sunk by gunfire about 28 nautical miles NNW of Henderson Field. There are only 33 survivors of the 212 men aboard the ship.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 10 B-24's from Canton in the Phoenix strike Maloelap Atoll; 20 others, sent against the same target from Nanumea run into bad weather; 2 attack a cargo ship (and other vessels near Maloelap Atoll the remaining 18 return to base without attacking.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: Marine 2d Tank Battalion scouts reconnoiter Abaiang and Marakei Atolls, north of Tarawa Atoll, finding but five Japanese, on the former.

    INDIA: Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek again agrees to Operation CHAMPION (plan for the offensive in Burma) while inspecting Chinese troops at Ramgarh.

    IRAN: The EUREKA Conference at Tehran between British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Soviet Premier Josef Stalin, ends. Acceding to Soviet desires to make Operation OVERLORD (Normandy invasion) the main effort, Operations OVERLORD and ANVIL (southern France) have been given priority over all other operations.
    Stalin has agrees to commit Soviet forces against Japan after Germany is defeated. From Tehran, British and U.S. delegates go back to Cairo, where the SEXTANT Conference talks will be renewed.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 6 P-40's bomb a fuel and ammunition dump at Luchiangpa; 8 others strafe several boats on a lake SE of Ansiang; supplies are dropped to Chinese troops in Changte.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 17 B-25's bomb Malai near Shortland. Fighter aircraft (AAF and USN) attack barges and AA guns at Tonolai Harbor, the SE coast of Ballale the NW tip of Choiseul , Amun above Cape Moltke, Numa Numa, and Chabai. Other fighters cover dive bombers attacking the Jakohina Mission area, gun positions at Kangu and Malabita Hill, and in the Mosigetta area; a few RNZAF Venturas hit the Mawareka area.

    UNITED STATES: Major General Alexander A. Vandegrift, USMC, is appointed as Commandant Designate of the U.S. Marine Corps and as a lieutenant general, is sworn in as the 18th Commandant on 1 January 1944. General Vandegrift commanded the 1st Marine Division during the Guadalcanal Campaign, for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor. Subsequently, he commanded the I Marine Amphibious Corps during the assault on Bougainville Island.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-24's bomb Cape Gloucester airfield on New Britain . In New Guinea, B-25's bomb and strafe villages along coast from Borgen Bay to Riebeck Bay; B-24's hit Alexishafen; B-25's and A-20's attack Kalasa and hit trucks in the Waroe area. The 386th, 388th and 389th Bombardment Squadrons (Dive), 312th Bombardment Group (Dive), arrives at Port Moresby, New Guinea from the US with P-40's. They will be redesignated Bombardment Group/Squadrons on 6 Dec; fly their first mission on 14 Jan 44; and convert to A-20G and H aircraft in Feb 44.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): A weather sortie is the only mission.

    CHINA: Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek decides to move the Chinese 22d and 38th Divisions from Burma to China for defense of Kunming. The Chinese 14th Division is eventually substituted for the 38th, so that current operations in Burma will suffer less. Major General Albert Wederneyer, Commanding General US China Theater of Operations and Chief of Staff to Chiang Kai-shek, informs the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Admiral Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander of the South-East Asia Theatre, of the Generalissimo' s decision. Chiang Kai-shek also agrees to provide 270,000 replacements for ALPHA (the plan to defend Kunming and Chungking) by 1 April 1945 but refuses a request to supply arms to the Chineses forces of the IX War Area.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 12 B-25s and 8 P-51s damage 2 railroad bridges and several buildings at Phu Lang Thuong and Phu Ly, French Indochina. 11 bomb 5 warehouses and several other buildings at Lashio and Wanling, Burma. 9 fighter-bombers hit shipping, rail targets, and troops at various points in Thailand. In China, 23 fighter-bombers attack targets of opportunity in the Chefang area; the 25th Fighter Squadron, 51st Fighter Group, based at Yunnani with P-40s and P-51s, sends a detachment to operate from Poashan.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 9 B-25s knock out and damage bridges at Bawgyo, Namhkai, and Hsenwi; 16 P-47s support ground forces at Bhamo; the town of Pinwe is found to be free of enemy forces; about 70 fighter-bombers attack troops and supply areas at several locations including Molo, Naungmo, Namun, Hkumpen, Myadaung, Kutkai, Kanbalu, Kyauk, and Natpe; 13 others attack bridges at Meza and in the Bawdwin area; 8 strafe targets of opportunity along the Kyaukme-Panglong road. 321 transport sorties are flown to forward areas. In India, HQ 1st Combat Cargo Group and the 4th Combat Cargo Squadron move from Sylhet to Tulihal with C-47s; the detachment of the 5th Fighter Squadron (Commando), 1st Air Commando Group, operating from Fenny with P-47s, returns to base at Asansol; the detachment of the 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 8th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, operating from Tingkawk Sakan, Burma with F-5s, returns to base at Barrackpore (other detachments are at Myitkyina, Burma and Chittagong); the 317th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando), 2d Air Commando Group, moves from Sylhet to Bikram with C-47s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 23 B-24s from Saipan bomb the airfield on Iwo Jima. 8 Guam based B-24s, escorting photo aircraft over the Kazan and Bonins, bomb Haha Jima. 37 from Angaur hit Legaspi Airfield. During the night of 29/30 Nov, 2 B-24s from Guam and Saipan bomb the Iwo Jima airfield on snooper missions.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The air echelons of the 36th and 80th Fighter Squadrons, 8th FG, operating from Morotai with P-38s, return to base at Dulag; the 340th Fighter Squadron, 348th FG, moves from Noemfoor Island to Tacloban with P-47s; the ground echelon of the 418th Night Fighter Squadron begins a movement from Dulag to San Jose (air echelon is on Morotai with P-61s).

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s in major strikes of the day hit Malimpoeng and Parepare Airfields on Celebes Island and four airfields on Halmahera Island. Fighter-bombers, B-24s, and B-25s fly armed reconnaissance, harassing strikes, and light raids over various areas of the Netherlands East Indies.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The projected Mindoro operation is postponed for ten days by General Douglas MacArthur, Commander in Chief South-West Pacific Area, in order to release shipping and naval support forces for landing in the Ormoc area on Leyte. The final target dates for Mindoro and Luzon are 15 December 1944 and 9 January 1945, respectively.
    In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special), which has been driving south to ease the pressure on the 32d Infantry Division in the Limon area, halts at a ridge east of Highway 2 about 5,000 yards SE of Limon; unable to progress farther because of strong opposition, the cavalrymen dig in and drive off Japanese patrols. In the XXIV Corps area, the battle of Shoestring Ridge ends successfully as elements of the 184th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, clear the bamboo thicket and establish the night perimeter on the forward slope of the ridge.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Legaspi Airfield on the southeastern tip of Luzon Island and Matina Aerodrome on Mindanao Island. B-25s strike Dumaguete Airfield on Negros Island and fighter-bombers, B-24s, and B-25s fly armed reconnaissance, harassing strikes, and light raids over various areas.

    1945
     
  20. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,240
    Likes Received:
    183
    [If you have anything too add, send me a pm]

    1935
    CHINA: Chiang Kai-shek is elected President of the Chinese Executive Committee.

    1940
    UNITED STATES: The government has arranged to make another US$100 million (US$1.4 billion in year 2005 dollars) available to the government of China.
    A nationwide Gallop Poll conducted during the first week of December asks Americans, "If you are asked to vote on the question of the United States entering the war against Germany and Italy, how would you vote - to go into the war or to stay out of the war?" Eighty eight percent said "stay out," 12 percent said "go in" and three percent express no opinion

    1941
    HAWAII ISLANDS: Communication Intelligence Summary for 1 December:
    "General.-All service radio calls of (Japanese) forces afloat changed promptly at 0000, 1 December. Previously, service calls changed after a period of six months or more. Calls were last changed on 1 November, 1941. The fact that service calls lasted only one month indicate an additional progressive step in preparing for active operations on a large scale.
    For a period of two to three days prior to the change of calls, the bulk of the radio traffic consisted of dispatches from one to four or five days old. It appears that the Japanese Navy is adopting more and more security provisions. A study of traffic prior to 0000, 1 December indicates that an effort was made to deliver all dispatches using old calls so that promptly with the change of calls, there would be a minimum of undelivered dispatches and consequent confusion and compromises. Either that or the large number of old messages may have been used to pad the total volume and make it appear as if nothing unusual was pending.
    First Fleet.-Nothing to indicate that this fleet as a fleet is operating outside of Empire waters. It is believed that such a large percentage of the First Fleet is operating with the Second Fleet Task Force that this fleet has ceased to operate in a prominent role.
    Second Fleet.-This fleet is believed proceeding from the Kure-Sasebo area in the direction of South China and Indo-China. Takao does not appear to play an important role in today's traffic; consequently, the assumption is made that his fleet is passing up Takao. Certain units of the Second Fleet Task Force are definitely in the Indo-China area (Cruiser Division Seven and Destroyer Squadron Three most prominent).
    Third Fleet.-Nothing to report except that the same association of
    Second, Third Fleets, and Combined Air Force with South China and Indo-China Forces continues.
    Fourth Fleet.-No change in the Fourth Fleet or Mandates area.
    Fifth Fleet.-Nothing to report.
    Submarines.-Large number of the Submarine Force believed to be in the area to the eastward of Yokosuka-Chichijima and Saipan Flagship somewhere in this general area.
    Carriers.-No change.
    Combined Air Force.-No change.

    JAPAN: The Imperial Privy Council meets and after discussing a war with the Allies, the ministers sign the documents declaring war, and give them to Emperor HIROHITO, who signs them a few hours later, telling his aides that he does not feel that a constitutional monarch can overturn his ministers on such a momentous decision.
    The Chief of the Naval General Staff, Admiral NAGANO Osami, sends Navy Order No. 9 to the Commander-in-Chief, Combined Fleet, Admiral YAMAMOTO Isoroku:
    (1) Japan has decided to open hostilities against the United States, Great Britain, and the Netherlands early in December,
    (2) the Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet will smash the enemy fleets and air forces in the Orient and at the same time will intercept and annihilate enemy fleets should they come to attack us,
    (3) the Commander-in-Chief of the Combined fleet will occupy immediately the key bases of the United States, Great Britain, and the Netherlands in East Asia in close cooperation with the Commander-in-Chief of the Southern Army and will capture and secure the key areas of the southern regions,
    (4) the Commander-in-Chief of the Combined fleet will cooperate with the operations of the China Area Fleet, if necessary,
    (5) the time of the start of operations based on the aforementioned items will be made known later, and
    (6) the Chief of the Naval General Staff will issue instructions concerning particulars.
    The Midway Destruction Unit of the Pearl Harbor Strike Force, consisting of two destroyers and an oiler, departs Tatyama Bay, Honshu, Japan, today. The two destroyers arrive off Midway at 2100 hours on 7 December.

    MALAYA: Reacting to reports of Japanese preparations, the British authorities declare a State of emergency in Malaya.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: As river gunboats USS Luzon (PR-7) and Oahu (PR-6), submarine rescue vessel USS Pigeon (ASR-6) and minesweeper USS Finch (AM-9) proceed through the South China Sea toward Manila, Philippine Islands, they become the object of curiosity by Japanese forces in the vicinity; first a floatplane circles the formation, then seven Japanese warships of various types.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: U.S. passenger liner ss President Harrison arrives at Olongapo, with the remaining elements of the 4th Marine Regiment withdrawn from Shanghai, China. President Harrison soon sails to bring out the last marines from China.

    UNITED STATES: In a meeting between Secretary of State Cordell Hull, Japanese Ambassador NOMURA Kichisaburo and special envoy KURUSU Saburo said "the Japanese people believe that the United States wants to keep Japan fighting with China and to keep Japan strangled."
    President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders a "defensive information patrol" of "three small ships" established off the coast of French Indochina; he specifically designates yacht USS Isabel (PY-10) as one of the trio of vessels. Schooner Lanikai is chartered and fitted out, but the start of the war results in her planned mission being cancelled. The third vessel, schooner Molly Moore, is selected for the mission but is never taken over. Lanikai's civilian career had seen her used as a "prop" in the filming of motion picture "Hurricane" that starred Dorothy Lamour and Jon Hall.
    President Roosevelt meets with British Ambassador to the U.S., Lord Halifax, and indicates the U.S. will enter the war on the British side if they are attacked by Japan, but did not explicitly promise this.
    The Director of Civilian Defense, former New York City Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, signs a formal order creating the Civil Air Patrol (CAP). Beginning in 1942, the civilian pilots of the CAP flew their unarmed personal aircraft over the East Coast on antisubmarine patrols. The CAP also flew search and rescue missions in the U.S. searching for downed aircraft.

    1942
    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The 8th Marine Regiment, 2d Marine Division, is withdrawn from forward positions west of Matanikau River, leaving Americal Division units to hold the western sector.

    CBI (Tenth Air Force) The 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron flies its first combat mission with F-4s from its base at Karachi, India with a detachment at Kunming, China; the squadron arrived at Karachi on 24 Jul.

    AUSTRALIA: HQ 33d Troop Carrier Squadron, 374th Troop Carrier Group with C-47s is established at Brisbane upon arrival from the US. A detachment has been operating from Cairns since 1 Nov and will remain there until 10 Dec.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS: Headquarters 5th BG (Heavy), and its 23d Bombardment Squadron with B-17s transfers from the Territory of Hawaii to Espiritu Santo Island, New Hebrides Islands.

    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A B-24 Liberator flies reconnaissance over the Semichis and Attu Islands. Weather prevents any other flights.

    BURMA: The Japanese, having rested and refitted, start back into the battle line Tengchung-Myitkyina- Kamaing Kalewa-Akyab.

    INDIA: The airlift from India to China is removed from the authority of Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell, Commander in Chief U.S .China-Burma-India Theater of Operations, Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, and Commander-in-Chief Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC), and made part of the USAAF Air Transport Command's India- China Wing.

    SW PACIFIC: In the Timor Sea, the Australian minesweeper HMAS Armidale is hit by two torpedoes dropped by Japanese torpedo bombers and sinks within five minutes about 103 nautical miles SSE of Dili, Portugese Timor, in position 10.00S, 126.30E.
    The ship was on her second voyage to Timor to evacuate refugees and bring relief personnel from Port Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
    There are 149 people aboard the ship and 40 crewmen and 58 Dutch soldiers and civilians are lost. Some survivors endure eight days at sea before being rescued while 29 manage to cling to a makeshift raft but drift away and are never seen again.

    NEW GUINEA: U.S. Lieutenant General Robert Eichelberger, Commanding General I Corps, flies to Dobodura, Papua New Guinea, and takes command of all troops in Buna area. The Australian 21st Brigade, 7th Division, after turning back from Giruwa three barge loads of Japanese attempting to reinforce Gona, attacks and captures Gona, forcing the Japanese back to Gona Mission for a final stand. Elsewhere, the Japanese show no signs of weakening and they exert heavy pressure against a roadblock (called "Huggins" after Capt Meredith M. Huggins) on the Soputa-Sanananda trail
    and withstands frontal and flanking attacks toward it. The Urbana Force (two battalions of the U.S. 126th and 128th Infantry Regiments, 32d Infantry Division) makes another futile attempt to reach Buna Village after artillery and mortar preparation with all available weapons.
    The Warren Force (based on U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division) continues attacks toward Cape Endaiadere on the right and New Strip on the left with little success; the 1st Battalion of the 126th Infantry Regiment gets elements to the northeastern edge of New Strip.
    In the air, USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20s, B-25s, B-26s and P-400 Airacobras attack the Buna area damaging a destroyer.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: As a result of damage received in the Battle of Tassafaronga, heavy cruiser USS Northampton sinks about 35 nautical miles NNW of Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, in position 09.12S, 159.50E.
    Japanese destroyer HIJMS Takanami goes down off the north coast of Guadalcanal about 28 nautical miles NNW of Henderson Field, in position 09.18S, 159.56E.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The 8th Marine Regiment, 2d Marine Division, is withdrawn from forward positions west of Matanikau River, leaving Americal Division units to hold the western sector.

    UNITED STATES: The U.S. government imposes gasoline quotas to conserve fuel. The armed forces overseas have fuel aplenty, but in the U.S., gasoline becomes costly and hard to get. People start using bicycles and their own two feet to get around.
    At major league baseball meetings in Chicago, Illinois, travel restrictions are the order of the day. Owners decide to restrict travel to a three-trip schedule rather than the customary four. Spring training in 1943 will be limited to locations north of the Potomac or Ohio Rivers and east of the Mississippi River.

    1943
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): In the Aleutian during the month of Dec 43, the detachment of the 344th Fighter Squadron, 343d FG, operating from Attu Airfield with P-40's, returns to it's base at Shemya.

    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 4 B-24's, flying out of Funafuti Atoll bomb Mille Atoll.

    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, B-24's bomb Insein; the B-24's and escorting P-38's encounter a large number of Japanese fighters over the targets; P-51's which failed to make rendezvous with the B-24's before the attack join the formations on the return trip; US losses are high: 6 B-24's including B-24J "Bugs Bunny" 42-73222 , B-24J 42-73055, B-24J 42-73159, B-24J 42-73183 , B-24J 42-73196 and a P-51 43-600 shot down and 5 more B-24's are seriously damaged; B-25's hit the newly repaired bridge at Myitnge rendering it temporarily unserviceable.
    During the night of 1/2 December, RAF Wellingtons bomb Rangoon.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 19 B-25's, 24 P-40's, and 10 P-51's pound Kowloon shipyards; 2 B-25's hit nearby Taikoo Docks in Hong Kong; 4 P-40's strafe a truck convoy near Lashio, Burma, 16 sink about 30 boats in the area around Changte, and 8 bomb Bac Ninh, French Indochina and vicinity.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: The Marine 2d Tank Battalion scouts find Maiana Atoll free of the Japanese, concluding their mission.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 18 B-25's and 8 P-38's attack Malai; P-39's strafe Tonolai Harbor and support US Navy (USN) dive bombers in an attack on the Jaba River area near Empress Augusta Bay; other Army Air Forces (AAF) and USN fighters cover dive bomber strikes on Kara and strafe targets at Tenekow, Chabai, and Mutupina Point.

    USMC VMF-214 "Black Sheep" lead by Pierre Carnnagey provide an eight plane F4U escort for bombers. After discovering their primar target Chabai covered in clouds, the formation of 48 US Navy SBD dive bombers from VMSB-236, and 24 TBFs preform strikes on Ballale supply areas. They met and observed no fighters at Ballale supply areas, only anti-aircraft fire. Two SBDs were lost, SBD 11002 and SBD 35976.

    6 B-25's bomb Sarime Plantation. A detachment of the 339th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group, ceases operating from Guadalcanal with P-38's and returns to it's base on New Caledonia. During the month of Dec 43: 1. HQ XIII Fighter Command transfers from Espiritu Santo , New Hebrides to Guadalcanal. 2. The 68th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group, based on Fiji ceases operating from Guadalcanal with P-39's.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 40+ B-24's bomb Wewak, the B-24's and P-47 escorts claiming 11 enemy fighters shot down out of interception force of about 50; 3 B-24's are lost including: B-24D-155 "Ten Knights in a Bar Room" 42-72806, B-24D-145-CO "Pistol Packin' Mama II" 42-41209 and B-24D 42-40830.
    The 20th Combat Mapping Squadron, 4th Photographic Group (Reconnaissance), begins a movement from Brisbane, Queensland, Australia to Port Moresby, New Guinea with B-24's and F-7's. They will fly their first mission on 5 Apr 44. The 387th Bombardment Squadron (Dive), 312th BG (Dive) arrives at Port Moresby, New Guinea from the US with P-40's. The squadron and group will be redesignated Bombardment Group/Squadron on 6 Dec. During the month of Dec 43: 1. The 90th BG and it's 319th, 320th, 321st and 400th Bombardment Squadrons transfer from Port Moresby to Dobodura with B-24's. The 82d Fighter Squadron (Reconnaissance), 71st Reconnaissance Group, based at Dobodura with P-39's sends a detachment to Finschhafen. Lost on a local flight is C-47 "The Amazon" 42-23659.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: Thirty five USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25s and B-26s hit Borgen Bay south of Cape Gloucester on New Ireland Island while 16 A-20s bomb the Cape Gloucester area.

    1944
    ALASKA: A small amount of material believed to be from a Japanese “Fu-Go Weapon” (balloon bomb) lands on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea. The island is located about 143 nautical miles southwest of Nome. The exact date the balloon landed is unknown.
    BURMA: Major General George Stratemeyer, Commanding General Army Air Forces, China Theater and Commanding General Eastern Air Command (EAC), issues a general order, effective December, reorganizing EAC. On the Northern Combat Area Command front, the Chinese 30th Division, with the 90th Regiment in the lead, is moving southward from the Bhamo area toward Namhkam over rough terrain.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-24s attack targets of opportunity in the S China Sea. 8 B-25s destroy 3 storage buildings and damage 6 others at Wanling, Burma; 9 fighter-bombers pound troop positions in the area and destroy or damage several trucks. Several other fighter-bombers hit trucks, locomotives, and villages in the Chefang, China area; between Lashio and Hsenwi, Burma; and from Linfen to Taiyuan, and at Kunlong, China.
    CAROLINE ISLANDS: In the Palau Islands, elements of the 81st Infantry Division complete the occupation of Kayangel Atoll in the northern Palaus.

    CHINA: Major General Albert Wedemeyer, Commanding General U.S. China Theater of Operations and Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek directs Major General Claire Chennault, Commanding General USAAF Fourteenth Air Force, to make the main effort of the Fourteenth Air Force in defense of the air line to China and Service of Supply; in addition to providing logistical support of U.S. military activities, to support certain Chinese forces in the China Theater.
    On the Salween front, Chinese forces take Che-fang.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 30+ P-47s continue support of ground forces in the Bhamo area; town areas, troops, warehouses, and supply dumps at Myitson, Mingon, Alezeik, Lenaung, and Old Lashioare are pounded by 30+ P-47s; 17 more hit bridges in N Burma and 8 strafe the Hsenwi landing ground. 290 transport sorties are flown to forward areas. In India, a detachment of the 6th Fighter Squadron (Commando), 1st Air Commando Group, begins operating from Fenny with P-47s (squadron is based at Asansol); the 14th and 15th Combat Cargo Squadrons, 4th Combat Cargo Group, arrive at Sylhet from the US with C-46s; during Dec 44, the detachment of the 1st Combat Cargo Squadron, 1st Combat Cargo Group, operating from Hathazari with C-47s, returns to base at Tulihal, the 427th Night Fighter Squadron, AAF, India-Burma Theater, moves from Pandaveswar to Myitkyina, Burma with P-61s, and the 436th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 7th Bombardment Group (Heavy), based at Madhaiganj, India with B-24s sends a detachment to Luliang, China to ferry gasoline to Suichwan, China.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 26 Guam based B-24s pound the airfield on Iwo Jima. During the night of 1/2, a B-24 bombs Iwo Jima during a snooper mission.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Lost on a training flight is F-6D Mustang 44-14621. HQ 3d Air Commando Group, the 3d Fighter Squadron (Commando) and the 157th, 159th and 160th Liaison Squadrons (Commando), arrive on Leyte Island from the US with P-51s and UC-64s and L-5s (first mission is 8 Jan and 7 Feb 45); a detachment of the 4th Photographic Charting Squadron, 311th Photographic Wing (attached to Thirteenth AF), begins operating from Morotai, with F-7s (squadron is based at Hollandia, New Guinea); the 342d Fighter Squadron, 348th Fighter Group, moves from Noemfoor to Tacloban Airfield with P-47s; the 408th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 22d BG (Heavy), moves from Leyte to Angaur Airfield with B-24s.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: On Leyte, the Japanese food supply is exhausted by this time. In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area, after preparatory fire, Company E, 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, attacks through Company C of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, to clear the knolls on the southeastern end of Kilay Ridge, taking the first. The 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, is ordered to withdraw from the ridge but is unable to do so for several days. The 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) attempts in vain to clear the ridge southeast of Limon. In the XXIV Corps area, a warning order for an assault on Ormoc is issued.
    Major USAAF Far East Air Forces strikes in the Philippine Islands include B-24 raids on Bacalod Airstrip and Fabrica Aerodrome on Negros Island; a B-25s attack, with P-47 support, on Lahug Airfield on Cebu Island; and B-25s attack Cagayan Airfield on Mindanao Island. Other FEAF aircraft maintain armed reconnaissance and sweeps over a wide area of the Philippine Islands.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25 and fighter-bombers hit several airfields and numerous targets of opportunity on Halmahera Island, Moluccas Islands, during a series of raids. Other FEAF aircraft maintain armed reconnaissance and sweeps over a wide area of the Netherland East Indies.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, The Australians take over from U.S. troops at Aitape.

    INDIAN OCEAN: In the Sunda Strait which connects the Indian Ocean and Java Sea between Sumatra and Java, German submarine U-196 is listed as missing; all 65 crewmen are lost.

    1945

     
    JagdtigerI likes this.

Share This Page