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This Day In The War, In The Pacific

Discussion in 'War in the Pacific' started by syscom3, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1935
    UNITED KINGDOM: The League of Nations hosts a one-day disarmament conference in London.

    1941
    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Communication Intelligence Summary, 2 December 1941: "General.-The most prominent factor in today's traffic is the apparent confusion in the routing of traffic for certain major parts of the Japanese Fleet. There were instances where the same dispatch was repeated several times after it appeared on the Tokyo broadcast and also where Takao Radio received the same dispatch that it had previously sent. ComSixteen reported Second and Third Fleets in Takao area and that Takao Radio was broadcasting traffic to these fleets. This broadcast was not uncovered here and contrary to location reports, there was one indication that these two fleets were not close to Takao. In several instances Takao Radio forwarded traffic to Tokyo for these fleets. Summing up all reports and indications, it is believed that the large fleet made up of Second, Third and First Fleet units has left Empire waters but is either not close enough to Takao for good communication or is proceeding
    on a course not close to Takao. The change of calls on December first has prevented this office from making definite statements at this date of the units now in the Southern area. To further complicate the situation, Shanghai Radio handled a considerable amount of traffic which obviously was originated by and destined for units in the Takao area. The Chief of Staff, South China area continues to appear in Shanghai ComSixteen reported nine submarines proceeding south by Camranh Bay. This group is believed to comprise both Submarine Squadrons five and six, which units normally operate with the First Fleet but have been included repeatedly in the Second Fleet Task Force for Southern operations. There was a very high percentage of high precedence traffic originated both by major forces afloat and Tokyo. Hainan continues as a prominent address. Palao and Third Base Force is holding the same relative importance.
    - "First Fleet.-Despite the lack of positive identification, the First Fleet appears relatively quiet. From inconclusive evidence, it appears as if there may have been a split in the original or normal Combined Fleet Staff and that these may be two supreme commanders with staffs. As an example, traffic routing indicates one Combined Fleet call associated with the Second and Third Fleets and apparently in company while another Combined Fleet call appears not associated with the Second and Third Fleets.
    - "Second Fleet.-No units have stood out prominently the last two or three days. This is partly due to lack of new identifications but contributes somewhat to the belief that a large part of the Second Fleet is underway in company. Cruiser Division Seven and Destroyer Squadron Three are unlocated and unobserved since change of calls.
    - " Third Fleet.-Nothing to report. Shanghai appeared in an indirect way in some of the Third Fleet traffic.
    - "Mandates.-Associat ion of Submarine Force and Fourth Fleet continues. Some traffic for Fourth Fleet units still going through Truk.
    - "Carriers.-Almost a complete blank of information on the Carriers today Lack of identifications has somewhat promoted this lack of information- however, since over two hundred service calls have been partially identified since the change on the first of December and not one carrier call has been recovered, it is evident that carrier traffic is at a low ebb.
    - "Combined Air Force.-This force continues to be associated closely with Second, Third and Indo-China Fleets. Some units of the Combined Air Force have undoubtedly left the Takao area."

    JAPAN: The Foreign Office sends the following message to the Japanese Embassy in Washington, D.C.:
    "(1.) Among the telegraphic codes with which your office is equipped burn all but those now used with the machine and one copy each of "O" code (Oite) and abbreviating code (L). (Burn also the various other codes which you have in your custody.)
    (2.) Stop at once using one code machine unit and destroy it completely.
    (3) When you have finished this, wire me back the one word "haruna."
    (4) At the time and in the manner you deem most proper dispose of all files of messages coming and going and all other secret documents.
    (5) Burn all the codes which Telegraphic Official KOSAKA brought you."
    A second message is sent to the Japanese consulate in Honolulu: "In view of the present situation, the presence in port of warships, airplane carriers, and cruisers is of utmost importance. Hereafter, to the utmost of your ability, let me know day by day. Wire me in each case whether or not there are any observation balloons above Pearl Harbor or if there are any indications that they will be sent up. Also advice me whether or not the warships are provided with anti-mine nets."
    The Chief of the Naval General Staff, Admiral NAGANO Osami, sends Navy Order No. 12 to Admiral YAMAMOTO Isoroku , Commander-in- Chief, Combined Fleet: "(1) As of 8 December the Commander-in- Chief of the Combined Fleet will start military operations in accordance with Imperial General Headquarters Navy Order No. 9. (2) Military operations will be launched against the Netherlands at an opportune time after attacking the United States and Great Britain." (Jack McKillop)
    The Japanese Cabinet is reorganized because of "the deteriorating international situation."

    MALAYA: British battleship HMS Prince of Wales (53), battlecruiser HMS Repulse (34) and destroyers HMS Electra (H 27), Encounter (H 10), Express (H 61) and Jupiter (F 85), arrive in Singapore and will form the British Far East Fleet. The aircraft carrier HMS Indomitable (92) was scheduled to join them, but was damaged when she ran aground in Jamaica, West Indies, on 3 November while training. These capital ships represent a British deterrence in the Far East.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The following message is from the Commander-in- Chief Asiatic Fleet to the Chief of Naval Operations and also sent to Commander-in- Chief Pacific Fleet: "Bearing 070 from Saigon distant 180 miles 3 type I-61 submarines in cruising formation headed south 15 knots. 21 transports anchored Camranh Bay with six planes patrolling overhead."

    UNITED STATES: Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles hands a note from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Japanese Ambassador NOMURA Kichisaburo and special envoy KURUSU Saburo asking for reasons the Japanese are increasing its forces in French Indochina. "It was my clear understanding that by the terms of the agreement and there is no present need to discuss the nature of that agreement between Japan and the French Government at Vichy that the total number of Japanese forces permitted by the terms of that agreement to be stationed in Indochina was very considerably less than the total amount of the forces already there. The stationing of these increased Japanese forces in Indochina would seem to imply the utilization of these forces by Japan for purposes of further aggression, since no such number of forces could possibly be required for the policing of that region. . . . because of the broad problem of American defense. I should like to know the intention of the Japanese Go
    vernment."

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A B-24 finds Semichi and Attu Islands unchanged during a reconnaissance run; a B-26 on reconnaissance finds Kiska Island closed by fog.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Army Forces in South Pacific Area) Headquarters 17th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 4th Photographic Group with the air echelon of A and B flights arrives Noumea, New Caledonia Is. The air echelons of C and D flights will remain in the US until Jan 44.

    GUADALCANAL - American bombers based at Henderson Field, Guadalcanal begin almost daily attacks on Munda Point, New Georgia to prevent the Japanese from constructing an airfield there.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Japanese try to reinforce their bridgehead. Four destroyers, with about 800 men embarked, reach Basabua early in the morning, but are forced by Allied aircraft to move on and land troops near the Kumusi River mouth, about 12 miles north of Gona. The Japanese maintain pressure on the roadblock on the Soputa- Sanananda trail, which the supply party reaches, and whittle down its perimeter. Efforts to reach the block frontally and from the right flank are again unsuccessful.
    The Urbana Force (two battalions of the U.S. 126th and 128th Infantry Regiments, 32d Infantry Division) attacks again toward Buna Village, in greater strength and after increased preparatory fire, but is halted short of the objective.
    Since simultaneous attacks against Cape Endaiadere and the New Strip have proved unfeasible, Warren Force (based on U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division) concentrates on New Strip, leaving a holding force (Company B, 128th Infantry Regiment) on the coastal track, where it fails to deceive the Japanese with a feint toward Cape Endaiadere. Warren Force attacks after air and ground bombardment, which does little damage to the Japanese, but results are negligible.
    Lieutenant General Robert Eichelberger, Commanding General I Corps, visits the Urbana front while his staff officers inspect the Warren front. Afterwards, Eichelberger relieves Major General Edwin F. Harding of command of the U.S. 32d Infantry Division and designates Brigadier General Albert W. Waldron as his successor.
    USAAF A-20s, B-17s, B-25s and P-400s attack four destroyers off Buna and Gona, and the airfield and positions in the in the Buna area and between Watutu Point and Cape Killerton. As a result of this attack, the destroyers, originally bound for Gona with 800 reinforcements, lands the troops near the mouth of the Kumment River 12 miles to the north.

    UNITED STATES: At the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, the first manmade, self-sustaining atomic chain reaction is achieved. In a squash court under the university (American) football stadium a group of scientists led by the Italian physicist, Enrico Fermi, allows the "pile" of uranium, insulated by graphite rods, to run for 4.5 minutes, which produces just one half-watt of power, but proves man can control atomic power.
    Scientists wait in awe as the neutron counter clicked faster. Then Fermi raises his hand. "The pile has gone critical," he said. Someone telephoned Dr. James Conant, the head of defense science in Washington. "Jim," he said, "the Italian navigator has just landed in the new world."

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 18 Japanese bombers and 30 Zekes attack Suichwan airfield; 9 P-40's intercept, shooting down 1 Japanese airplane; 2 P-40's are lost; 6 P-40's on armed reconnaissance bomb villages between Sha Nyao and Chiao Tou Chieh; 16 others bomb Japanese positions NE of Changte.

    BURMA: Eight B-25s, with 7 fighters as escort attack river steamer and cement plant at Thayetmyo, damaging both with direct hits. Four P-51's achieve good results at Prome cement factory.
    Twelve A-36's possibly damage bridge 6 mi. NW of Manywet with 8 near misses. Myitkyina runway hit by 6 P-40's with 4 others as cover. Three successful raids are made on enemy arty positions at Ningbyen by total of 10 A36's.
    Fifteen RAF Wellingtons start 3 large fires at Bassein.
    Japanese positions in Fort White and Buthedaung areas hit by total of 17 Vengeances and 6 Hurricanes.

    INDOCHINA: Four Allied fighters raid Nguyen Bing mines and on return flight strafe Ha Gianag airfield.

    PTO: Two B-24's bomb Ocean I., starting a fire.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 20+ B-25's hit Malai and attack positions on the Porror River and Rigu Mission at Kieta; 20+ B-24's bomb Korovo; fighter patrols strafe Chabai area.

    BOUGAINVILLE: Allied patrol in NE sector of Empress Augusta Bay area loses contact with Japanese.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): In New Guinea, 50+ B-25's pound the Borgen Bay area; 20 B-25's and B-26's hit enemy forces in the Finschhafen area; and the Sio area is bombed by 2 B-24's.
    New Guinea: With tank support, Allied troops reduce Japanese strongpoint along trail from Bonga to Wareo. Excellent results achieved by 10 B-25's and 10 B-26's bombing supply dumps 2 mi. N of Bonga.
    N.E.I.: During early morning raid on Toeal, Kei Is., 4 RAF. PBY's cause fires and explosions in waterfront area.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: USN submarine USS Narwhal lands ammunition and stores, and evacuates certain people from Mindanao.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 4 B-25s damage several buildings at Hsenwi, Burma. 39 P-51s, P-40s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance attack troops, horses, trucks, railroad yards, shipping, storage facilities, and road machinery between Yungfengshih and Paoching, China; N of Wanling, from Wanling to Lashio and in Lashio Burma; in the Chiuchiang area, Nan Tan, and at Kichang, China.

    CHINA: Major General Albert Wedemeyer, Commanding General U.S. China Theater of Operations and Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, presents Chiang Kai-shek a proposal, suggested by Colonel David D. Barrett of the American Observer Group in Yenan, to form three communist regiments in Yenan, to be equipped by the U.S., for use in Nationalist territory under command of a U.S. officer. The plan is rejected. Later in December, Major General Robert McClure, Chief of Staff U.S. Forces US China Theater of Operations, drafts a plan for U.S. airborne units of technicians to go into communist China and informally presents it to the nationalists and communists for approval. A Japanese column driving on Kweiyang reaches Tu-shan

    BURMA: In the British Fourteenth Army's XXXIII Corps area, the East African 11th Division reaches the Chindwin River at Kalewa.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 40 fighter-bombers fly close support strikes in the Bhamo battle sector; supply areas, ammunition dumps, personnel and tank concentrations, and strongholds at Mayathein, Kwingyi, Nanthe, Hsai-hkao, Hsenwi, Man Hkam, Wuntho, Tedaw, and Old Lashio are hit by 60+ fighter-bombers; 16 others hit rolling stock on the rail line between Hsipaw and Lashio and strafe a supply train in Pangkyawng; 10 B-25s pound several N Burma bridges, knocking out road bridges at Tonglau and Nam Nung and 2 railroad bridges at Tangon. Transports fly 286 sorties to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 23 B-24s from Guam hit Iwo Jima. During the night of 2/3 Dec 3 B-24s on snooper missions from Saipan and Guam bomb an airfield on Iwo Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: Fighter-bombers in the C Philippine Islands and Mindanao Island support ground forces and hit supplies, communications, and a variety of targets of opportunity. The 19th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 22d BG (Heavy), moves from Leyte Island to Angaur Airfield with B-24s.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s and B-25 Mitchells attack Baoebaoe Airfield and Kendari on Celebes Island. B-25s bomb Namlea Airfield on Boeroe Island and attack shipping off Ceram Island.
    Australian B-24s attack a small Japanese convoy in the Makassar Strait between Borneo and Celebes Island, Netherlands East Indies. The aircraft sink a small freighter and damage a freighter and a fuel barge.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: During a USN attack on Japanese shipping in Ormoc Bay, Leyte, on the night of 2/3 December, USN destroyer USS Cooper, accompanied by destroyers USS Allen M Sumner and Moale, engage two Japanese destroyers, HIJMS Kuwa and Take. USS Cooper is struck by a torpedo possibly from HIJMS Kuwa causing an explosion on her starboard side and breaking the ship in two about 9 nautical miles S of Ormoc in position 10.54N, 124.36E. Before being hit, USS Cooper and the other two destroyers sink HIJMS Kuwa and damages her sistership HIJMS Take. Cooper sinks within minutes taking the lives of 191 crewmen. "Black Cat" PBY-5A Catalinas pick up 168 survivors that night and the next day. One PBY carries 56 in addition to its eight-man crew. USS Allen M. Sumner is damaged by horizontal bomber, and USS Moale is damaged (possibly by Kuwa) in Ormoc Bay. This is the only naval engagement of the Pacific War in which US ships are fired upon simultaneously from the air, sea and from shore batteries in one short desperate four hour battle.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, Companies E and F, 128 Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, extend southward on Kilay Ridge against firm resistance. The 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, is ordered by the 128th Infantry Regiment commander to remain on the ridge until further notice. The 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) continues efforts to clear the ridge southeast of Limon and sends Troop A toward Highway 2 to make contact with the 32d Infantry Division.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s hit Dumaguete Airfield on Negros Island and Matina and Cagayan Airfields on Mindanao Island. Fighter-bombers in the central Philippines and Mindanao Island support ground forces and hit supplies, communications, and a variety of targets of opportunity.
    USN submarine USS Gunnel lands supplies and evacuates Allied aviators from Palawan.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Australian Lieutenant General William Bridgeford, General Officer Commanding 3rd Australian Division, informs his senior officers that the first phase of operations in the southern sector of Bougainville will be the capture of Mosigetta and Mawaraka which are about 25 miles SE of Torokina.

    1945
     
  2. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1936
    CHINA: Following a labor dispute in the Chinese port of Tsingtao, Japanese naval infantry occupy the city.

    1937
    CHINA: The German Ambassador to China offers to be the Japanese peace intermediary because German economic interests are threatened.

    1941
    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Major General Lewis H. Brereton, Commanding General Far East Air Force, returns from his trip to Australia, and is instructed by Lieutenant General Douglas MacArthur, Commanding General U.S. Army Forces Far East, to plan on leaving on 8 December for another trip, this time a 5,733-mile journey to Djakarta, Netherlands East Indies; Singapore, Malaya; Rangoon, Burma; and Chunking, China, to co-ordinate defensive measures with the Dutch, British, and Chinese, and to receive a report on Japanese air activities from Claire Chennault, commander of the American Volunteer Group (AVG).
    Admiral Thomas C. Hart, Commander-in- Chief Asiatic Fleet, personally briefs Lieutenant John Walker Payne, Jr, captain of the USN yacht USS Isabel (PY-10) and assigns his ship to the "Defensive Information Patrol." As the threat of war grows ever larger, the small ship is sent out on orders from U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt to make a reconnaissance of the coast of French Indochina. Payne sails today. She is ordered back to Manila on 5 December.

    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt again meets with British Ambassador Lord Halifax and indicates that the U.S. will enter the war on the British side if they are attacked by Japan, but does not explicitly promise this.
    The Japanese embassy in Washington, D.C. sends the following message to Tokyo: "Judging from all indications, we feel that some joint military action between Great Britain and the United States, with or without a declaration of war, is a definite certainty in the event of an occupation of Thailand."

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: The Japanese light cruisers HIJMS Abukuma and Kiso and destroyer HIJMS Wakaba, land 1,115 troops of the 302nd Battalion on Kiska.
    Two USAAF bombers and several fighters fly reconnaissance over Semichi Islands and the Japanese held Kiska and Attu Islands. There is a constant air alert for US forces on Adak.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the situation of the U.S. 126th Infantry Regiment roadblock on the Soputa-Sanananda trail remains precarious as the Japanese continue to attack it repeatedly from all sides and to prevent the forward movement of Allied units attempting to reach it.
    On the Urbana Force (two battalions of the U.S. 126th and 128th Infantry Regiments, 32d Infantry Division) and Warren Force (based on U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division) fronts, troops are being rested and regrouped in preparation for all-out attack on 5 December. U.S. Lieutenant General Robert Eichelberger, Commanding General I Corps, requests that the 126th Infantry Regiment headquarters be moved east of the Girua River and is promised Australian troops and tanks. The Japanese are successfully supplied by air.
    In Papua New Guinea, Fifth Air Force A-20s, B-25s and P-40s bomb and strafe Sanananda Point and the Buna areas and attack a small torpedo boat in Dyke Acland Bay. During the night of 3/4 December, B-17s bomb airfields at Lae and Salamaua.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Solomons Sea, a lone USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s attacks a submarine 75 miles SE of Rabaul, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the movement of the Aola Force, less 2d Marine Raider Battalion, to Koli Point, where an airfield is to be constructed, is completed. The Aola Force is joined by the 18th Naval Construction Battalion and the rest of 9th Marine Defense Battalion.
    On New Georgia Island, the Japanese are discovered to be constructing an airfield at Munda Point, which becomes a target for almost daily air attacks.
    Eight USMC SBDs, seven USMC TBFs and USAAF P-39s and USMC F4Fs attack the Tokyo Express in New Georgia Sound; the destroyer HIJMS Makinami is slightly damaged. The Japanese throw some 1,500 supply canisters overboard for their troops on Guadalcanal, but only 310 reach the intended recipients. In the air, ten Pete seaplanes are shot down, six by USMC F4F pilots and four by USAAF P-39 pilots at 1830 hours local. U.S. losses are one TBF, one SBD and one fighter.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): 8 P-40's attack barracks and other buildings at Wanling, China.
    Chang-te, in the Tung-ting Lake area, falls to the Japanese, climaxing a local offensive the by Japanese 11th Army designed to disrupt Chinese troop concentrations and divert the Chinese from Yunnan. Having accomplished their mission and taken the rice center of Chang-te, the Japanese soon begin a withdrawal.

    USN - Sunk at Kwajalein by aircraft is Asakaze Maru.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 3 B-25's bomb Kieta Harbor and nearby supply and bivouac areas; 6 others hit Aitara Mission; 21 B-24's pound Bonis; fighter aircraft, USAAF and USN on patrol, hit targets of opportunity in areas from Numa Numa to Koromira, at Mosiga and Chabai, and W of Rlutupina Point; B-24's on armed reconnaissance hit a variety of targets, including Kieta, Green, Greenwich, and Korovo. The 372d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 307th BG (Heavy), based on Espiritu Santo with B-24's, ceases operating from Guadalcanal in the Solomon.

    BOUGAINVILLE: Some improvement reported in Allied positions in Torokina area; Japanese positions near Mavavia (E of Torokina R.) shelled by Allied arty with excellent results; uneventful patrolling continues.
    Throughout the day, total, of 36 TBF's and 58 SBD's operate against Japanese supply areas in S Bougainville from Buin to Empress Augusta Bay; raids are made at 45-minute intervals by groups of 6 planes each; bridge and 30-40 buildings destroyed and numerous fires started; 1 TBF lost.
    Night of 3/4, formation of 15-25 enemy torpedo and dive bombers attacks 9th echelon en route to Torokina; attack occurs about 3.5 mi. SW of Empress Augusta Bay; near misses cause minor damage, and casualties; 3 enemy planes shot down and several others probably destroyed by AA fire from ships, while Allied fighter downs another and is then destroyed.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 60+ B-24's and B-25's bomb Cape Gloucester Airfield; 1 B-24 sinks several barges in Johann Albrecht Harbor while another bombs a large transport near New Hanover. A-20's attack villages around Finschhafen; P-47's shoot down several airplanes over Wewak. B-24D 42-40475 is lost on a reconnaissance mission.
    NEI: Twenty-four B-24s attack Waingapoe, Soemba I. when weather prevents raid on Koepeng; 29 tons of bombs cause large fires.

    NEW GUINEA: Stubbornly resisting Japanese slow Allied advance along trail 900 Yds. S of Wareo.

    1944

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 5 B-24s place delayed action bombs near Pengpu bridge; 4 B-25s and 10 P-51s bomb a storage area at Sintsiang; 67 fighter-bombers on armed reconnaissance blast trucks, railroad targets, warehouses, shipping and other targets of opportunity at Wanling, Burma, and in China, Loyang, Yuncheng, Hei-Shih Kuan, Wuhu, and particularly in areas around Shihhweiyao and from Hengyang to Siangtan and Lingling.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 32 P-47s continue close support of ground forces attacking Bhamo; 18 others damage road bridges at Hay-ti and Tonbo and 6 attack several railroad bridges in N Burma; 4 drop delay-fuse bombs on the Myitson ferry landing; 30+ fighter-bombers hit troop and equipment concentrations, fuel and other supplies, artillery, ammunition dumps, and general town areas in or near Hopaw, Loipao, Man Kat, Namhpai, and Indaw; 9 strafe targets of opportunity along the Shwebo-Wuntho rail line; 4 B-25s during the night of 3/4 Dec, destroy a train on the Tangon railroad bridge and attack several other targets of opportunity. 323 transport sorties are flown to forward bases and frontline areas.

    CHINA: The Japanese 11th Army halts its unauthorized drive into Kweichow Province toward Kweiyang as its supplies run out.

    BURMA: In the British Fourteenth Army's XXXIII Corps area, the East African 11th Division establishes a bridgehead across the Chindwin River at Kalewa, where bridging is undertaken under fire. The Indian 20th Division secures a bridgehead across the river to the north in the Mawlaik area, crossing a brigade and uses Kalewa site for crossing the rest of the division

    CEYLON: Admiral Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander South East Asia Theatre, agrees to permit the Chines 22d and 38th Divisions to move from Burma to China to defend Kunming.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 17 Guam B-24s pound Iwo Jima; 7 others, escorting photo aircraft over the Bonin and Kazan, bomb Haha Jima and Iwo Jima. B-24s on snooper missions from the Mariana during the night of 3/4, continue to bomb Iwo Jima.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 10: 86 Mariana Island-based B-29s are dispatched to attack the Musashino aircraft plant and docks and urban areas in Tokyo, Japan; 60 B-29s hit the primary target and 15 hit alternate targets; they claim 10-11-18 Japanese aircraft; 5 B-29s are lost including: B-29 "Rosalia Rocket" 42-24656,

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, major USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 strikes include raids against Malimpoeng and Mandai on Celebes Island while B-25s attack four airfields on Halmahera Island..
    NEW GUINEA: USAAF Far East Air Forces A-20s attack Point Noejew, Dutch New Guinea.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN hospital ship USS Hope (AH-7), fully illuminated in accordance with the dictates of the Geneva Convention, is followed by a Japanese submarine during the morning and is then attacked by Japanese torpedo planes but not damaged, 125 nautical miles (231 kilometers) east of Mindanao, Philippine Islands.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area, Troop G of the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) tries unsuccessfully to scale the steep slopes of a ridge southeast of Limon. Troop A makes contact with the 126th Infantry Regiment west of Hill 1525 without incident. In the XXIV Corps area, at a commanders’ conference, Major General Archibald V. Arnold, Commanding General 7th Infantry Division, orders the division to clear the region south of the Talisayan River, including Hills 918. 380, and 606, beginning on 5 December.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces fighter-bombers hit a storage area at Palompon on Leyte Island and airfields near Masbate Island.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, a platoon of the Australian 9th Battalion, 7th Brigade, 3rd Division attacks the village of Sisivie, about 10 miles N of Torokina but is forced to withdraw.

    1945
     
  3. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1936
    JAPAN: U.S. Ambassador to Japan Joseph C. Grew reports a rumor of a German-Japanese military agreement stating that ". . . the Soviet Government has indisputable evidence that a military agreement exists."


    1941
    BONIN ISLANDS: The Japanese Navy's Guam Invasion Group, South Seas Force, departs Haha Jima at 0900 hours. This force consists of nine transports, four each heavy cruisers, destroyers and submarine chasers, three gunboats, two each coastal minesweepers and netlayers, and one each minelayer, oiler and seaplane tender. These ships arrive off Guam at 0100 hours on 8 December.

    CHINA: Two units of the Japanese Navy's Malaya Invasion Group (Vice Admiral OSAWA) of the Southern Force, sail from Samah Bay, Hainan Island, China. The two units are
    (1) the Escort Unit (Rear Admiral KURITA) consisting of the heavy cruisers HIJMS Kumano, Mikuma, Mogami and Suzuya and three destroyers; and
    (2) the Kota Bharu Cover Unit (Vice Admiral Ozawa) consisting of the heavy cruiser HIJMS Chokai and a destroyer. Both units were east of Kota Bharu, Malaya, on 8 December.
    Two units of the Japanese Navy's Distant Cover Group (Vice Admiral KONDO) of the Southern Force, sail from Mako, Pescadores Islands today. (The Pescadores Islands are located in the Formosa Strait between Formosa and mainland China.) The Main Unit (Vice Admiral KONDO) consists of the battelships HIJMS Haruna and Kongo, the heavy cruisers HIJMS Atago and Takao and ten destroyers. The Supply Unit consists of five oilers, a patrol craft tender and a transport.

    EAST INDIES: The following message is sent from the U.S. Embassy in Batavia, Netherlands East Indies, to the State Department in Washington, D.C.: "War Department at Bandoeng claims intercepted and decoded following from Ministry Foreign Affairs Tokyo: "When crisis leading to worst arises following will be broadcast at end weather reports: one east wind rain war with United States, two north wind cloudy war with Russia, three west wind clear war with Britain including attack on Thailand or Malaya and Dutch Indies. If spoken twice burn codes and secret papers.' Same re following from Japanese Ambassador Bangkok to Consul General Batavia: "When threat of crisis exists following will be used five times in texts of general reports and radio broadcasts: one Higashi east America, two Kita North Russia, three Nichi west Britain with advance into Thailand and attack on Malaya and Dutch Indies.' Thorpe and Slawson cabled the above to War Department. I attach little or no importance
    to it and view it with some suspicion. Such have been common since 1936."

    HAWAII: Communication Intelligence Summary, 4 December 1941: General.-Traffic volume normal with fair receiving conditions. Takao Radio today instituted a fleet broadcast system using the prefix UTU in heading so that there are now two fleet broadcasts in operation. So far only a few messages have been placed on the Takao broadcast. There were a large number of urgent messages, today, most of these from Tokyo to the major commanders. Among others Tokyo Intelligence originated a seven part message to Chiefs of Staff China Fleet, Combined Fleet, Third Fleet, South China Fleet, French Indo-China Force and Sama. In all, this activity sent twelve messages to the major commanders.
    - Combined Fleet.- The outstanding item of today's traffic is the lack of messages from the CinC. Second Fleet and CinC. Third Fleet. These previously very talkative commanders are now very quiet. While the Fleet calls are not yet well identified, the lack of traffic from these commands cannot be ascribed to that. These two commands are still prominent as addressees. It is now believed that the CinC. Second Fleet is in the vicinity of Takao and that the apparently conflicting evidence is due to traffic destined for the Tokyo UTU broadcast which CinC. Second Fleet is still copying. The CinC. Combined Fleet sent one message to an unidentified unit for information to Third Base Force Palao, CinC. Second Fleet and CinC. Third Fleet.
    - Fourth Fleet.- The CinC. Fourth Fleet sent a message to Chief of Staff Combined Air Force, information to Eleventh Air Corps, Chitose Air, Air Squadron Twenty-four, Third Base Force at Palao and Fourth Base Force at Truk. No further check could be made today on the presence of Fourth Fleet units in the Marshalls. Jaluit appeared many times in today's traffic being associated with Commander Submarine Force, Tokyo Radio and MUSI 88 (which is believed to be an oil tanker).
    - South China.- Bako continues as an active originator addressing many messages to Sama and Saigon. Except for traffic between South China Commanders, all units in that area quiet.

    HONG KONG: USN river gunboat USS Mindanao (PR-8) sails from Hong Kong, British Crown Colony, for Manila, Philippine Islands. She is the last USN ship to depart Chinese waters prior to war. The Luzon Stevedoring Company tug Ranger follows subsequently, carrying spare parts and 800 3-inch (76 mm) shells for Mindanao's main battery (previously stored ashore at Hong Kong). Only two U.S. naval vessels remain in Chinese waters: river gunboat USS Wake (PR-3) at Shanghai to maintain communications until a radio station is established at the Consulate General with Navy equipment, and river gunboat USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, where she furnishes essential services to the U.S. Embassy.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Under extremely poor weather and wave conditions, Admiral Nagumo's Hawaiian attack force manages to replenish its fuel stores. The replenishment ships head for the return leg rendezvous point and the carriers turn south for their final run to Hawaii.
    That same day, a routine scouting flight from the USN aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6) en route from Wake Island to Hawaii, sights Honolulu-bound tug USS Sonoma (AT-12) with Pan American Airways barges PAB No. 2 and PAB No. 4 in tow. USS Sonoma, armed with only two 30-caliber (7.62 mm) machine guns, will eventually reach Honolulu on 15 December, with her tows.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The following message is sent from the U.S. Army Forces Far East to the Army's Adjutant General in Washington, D.C.: "Replying your radio of November twenty eight and your radio six four seven on same subject all practical steps within the limits of the facilities of this command are being taken to protect all air and ground installations. "
    USN river gunboats USS Luzon (PR-7) and Oahu (PR-6), followed later by submarine rescue vessel USS Pigeon (ASR-6) and minesweeper USS Finch (AM-9), reach Manila.

    WAKE ISLAND: The USN aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, part of Task Force 8, flies off 12 Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats, a detachment of Marine Fighting Squadron Two Hundred Eleven (VMF-211), to the island. The Marine fighters are launched when the Enterprise is 75 nautical miles N of the island. Task Force 8 then turns east and heads back to Pearl Harbor where they are due to arrive on 6 December.
    A Japanese "Nell" bomber (Mitsubishi G3M2, Type 96 Attack Bomber) of the Chitose Kokutai (Naval Air Corp) based on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, reconnoiters Wake Island undetected.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: Seven B-24s and nine B-26s escorted by 16 P-38s takeoff based on a Navy PBY Catalina report of a surface force southeast of Amchitka Island. At the interception point, the area is searched without results. The PBY pilot later reports he saw "clouds." Reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Agattu, Semichi, Kiska and Amchitka Islands.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Japanese maintain pressure against the block on the Soputa-Sanananda trail. Advance elements of the 127th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, reach Dobodura. Lines on Urbana Force (two battalions of the U.S. 126th and 128th Infantry Regiments, 32d Infantry Division) and Warren Force (based on U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division) fronts are rearranged to permit units operating under battalions other than their own to return to parent battalions.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force) A-20s, B-25s and P-400s bomb and strafe Sanananda Point and the Buna areas and attack a small torpedo boat in Dyke Acland Bay. During the night of 3/4 Dec, B-17s bomb airfields at Lae and Salamaua. Lost is B-17F "Dumbo" 41-24429. On the ground, the US roadblock on the Soputa-Sanananda trail remains precarious as the Japanese maintain attacks from all sides and hold off US reinforcements. In the Bismarck Archipelago, a lone B-17s attacks a submarine 75 miles southeast of Rabaul. Lost on a training flight is P-38F "Synchronized Sal" 42-12646.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, Carlson's raiders (2d Marine Raider Battalion) reach the Lunga perimeter, having marched west from Aola Bay.
    During the month-long journey, more than 400 Japanese dead have been counted for the loss of 17 raiders.

    UNITED STATES: Two hundred forty four US Congressmen present a petition for the establishment of a Jewish homeland in Palestine to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    1943
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 3 bombers return early from an armed sea search, due to weather.

    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 34 B-24's from the Ellice and Canton bomb Mille Atoll 20+ others abort due to bad weather. 8 B-24's from Funafuti attack Nauru.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: On Tarawa Atoll, Captain Jackson R. Tate, USN, Commander, Advanced Base, Tarawa, takes command, relieving Major General Julian Smith, USMC. During December and January, air bases are constructed in the Gilberts.
    Nine enemy bombers hit Tarawa with 36 100lb. bombs, destroying 1 PV and 1 F6F and damaging 2 PV's and 6 F6F's; small gasoline dump set on fire.

    USN - USN Task Force 50 (Rear Admiral Charles A. Pownall) attacks Japanese installations on Kwajalein and Wotje Atolls. Planes from the aircraft carrier USS Lexington sink a collier, a cargo ship, an auxiliary submarine chaser, and a guardboat and damage light cruisers HIJMS Nagara and Isuzu, a stores ship, an auxiliary vessel, and three transports. Other aircraft carriers involved in the attacks are Bunker Hill, Enterprise, Essex and Yorktown and small aircraft carrier USS Cowpens.
    Between 0705 and 0940 hours, USN fighters shoot down 34 Zero fighters and four "Betty" bombers over Kwajalein Atoll. Around 1200 hours, eight "Kate" torpedo bombers are shot down by antiaircraft fire over the fleet. Beginning at about 2000 hours, an estimated 30 to 50 "Betty" bombers and "Kate" torpedo bombers organized into 14 flights or individually attempt to sink the U.S. ships.
    At 2323 hours, a "Betty" bomber launches an aerial torpedo which strikes the aircraft carrier USS Lexington on the starboard side about 360 nautical miles NE of Kwajalein Atoll. The torpedo knocks out her steering gear. Settling 5 feet by the stern, the carrier begins circling to port amidst dense clouds of smoke pouring from ruptured tanks aft. An emergency hand-operated steering unit is quickly devised, and Lexington makes for Pearl Harbor for emergency repairs. Two other ships are damaged, light cruiser USS Mobile when one of her 5-inch mounts accidentally fires into one of her own 40-millimeter mounts, and destroyer USS Taylor by friendly fire from light cruiser USS Oakland.
    Strikes scheduled for tomorrow are cancelled and TF 50 returns to Pearl Harbor. This retirement costs the cautions Admiral Pownall his command.

    BURMA: Japanese attack on Ningbyen in the Hukawng Valley is repulsed.
    One B-25 and 7 P-40's' attack Bhamo town and airfield, scoring a number of hits in'both areas. Town and airfield at. Myitkyina hit by 1 B-25, 6 A-36's, and 14 P-40's with considerable success. Twenty-four B-25 sorties flown against Japanese troop concentrations in Kaungkasi area;, results reported excellent, and an ammunition dump is destroyed.
    In S Burra, 18 B-24's participate in mining of, Loulmein Channel and Rangoon estuary.
    Three RAF Liberators effectively bomb Liandalay Riti yards.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 11 B-25's and 12 P-40's bomb Changte, which was taken by the Japanese earlier in the day; 11 more B-25's and 24 P-40's follow with 2 more attacks on Changte; other P-40's drop ammunition to Chinese troops on Tehshan Mountain.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 21 B-24's attack Chabai; 17 B-25's follow with a strike on the same target.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): On New Britain in the Bismarck Archipelago, nearly 50 bombers hit Cape Gloucester Airfield and attack shore targets from Rottock Bay to Rein Bay. 12 A-20's hit villages and supply dumps in the Finshaffen area. 30+ P40's sink an oil laden lugger and 2 barges off Bogia and bomb bridge near Bogadjim. Lost in a training excercise is P-38H "Japanese Sandman II" 42-66905

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Sailfish torpedoes and sinks Yokosuka, Japan-bound Japanese escort aircraft carrier HIJMS Chuyo about 280 nautical miles SE of Tokyo, Honshu, Japan, in position 32.27N, 143.49E. There are about 1,250 Japanese crewmen aboard and only 160 survive. Unbeknown to Sailfish, Chuyo is carrying 20 survivors from her sistership USS Sculpin which was damaged and scuttled about 154 miles north of Truk Atoll, Caroline Islands, on 19 November. Only one of the USN sailors survives.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the 1st Marine Parachute Regiment arrives and is soon committed to help advance the outpost line.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): A weather aircraft aborts shortly after takeoff.

    CHINA: In the course of reorganizing the government to make it more progressive and efficient, Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek names T. V. Soong premier as well as foreign minister.

    CHINA 20TH BOMBER COMMAND: U.S. Major General Albert Wedemeyer, Commander in Chief US China Theater of Operations and Chief of Staff to Chiang Kai-shek, asks that USAAF XX Bomber Command's B-29 Superfortresses, which are a strain on Hump tonnage, be moved from China. He suggests redeploying the aircraft to the Mariana Islands.

    INDIA: The RAF 3rd Tactical Air Force, which is tasked with supporting the British Fourteenth Army in Burma, is dissolved and replaced by Headquarters RAF Bengal and Burma. Two groups, No. 221 Group RAF supporting the Indian IV Corps and No. 224 Group RAF supporting the Indian XV Corps, are assigned.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 24 B-25s, supported by 12 P-40s, hit bridges, buildings, and river, road, and rail traffic at several points in China, French Indochina, and Burma including Lashio, Kutkai and Namhkai, Burma; and Saiping, Hsiangcheng, Lingling, the Kweilin area, between Minkiang, and Sinantien, and between Sinyang and Saiping, China; 90+ fighter-bombers on armed reconnaissance pound numerous targets of opportunity from Hsenwi, Burma to Nanning, China; Lang Son, French Indochina; and Namhkai, Burma and across S China from the Burma border to Amoy, China.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 28 P-47s attack and damage bridges at Kawnghka, Namyao, Nampawng, Namhkai, and Hsenwi and demolish the main bridge at Ho-kho; 8 P-47s support ground forces in the Bhamo area; 60+ fighter-bombers hit enemy-held positions, troop concentrations, supply areas, warehouses, and general targets of opportunity at Man Mau, Nwegyo, Mogok, Hkayanzatkon, Pangpong, Namahokgyi, Kyu-sa, Man Maw, Mongnaw, and Man Htam. Transports fly 308 sorties to forward areas. The 319th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando), 1st Air Commando Group, based at Asansol, India with C-47s begins operating from various forward bases in Burma.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 3 B-24s from Guam Island hit Marcus while 3 from Saipan Island bomb Pagan Island in the Mariana Islands. Snooper missions continue as 2 Mariana Islands-based B-24s bomb Iwo Jima Island during the night of 4/5 Dec.

    MARIANA ISLANDS: Headquarters of the USAAF Twentieth Air Force's XXI Bomber Command arrives at Harmon Field, Guam, from the US.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: USAAF Seventh Air Force bombers begin harassing night attacks on Luzon airfields.
    On Leyte, Lieutenant General Walter Krueger, Commanding General Sixth Army, orders an attack tomorrow to destroy the Japanese in the Ormoc area, with the X Corps moving southward astride Highway 2 to support the XXIV Corps. In the X Corps area, the 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, begins a withdrawal from the Kilay Ridge toward Pinamopoan. The 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) continues futile efforts to clear the ridge southeast of Limon. The XXIV Corps prepares for an assault on Ormoc with the 7th Infantry Division by land and the 77th Infantry Division by sea. The 184th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, gets patrols as far north as Balogo. The 776th Amphibious Tank Battalion after dark moves to waters 1,000 yards W of Balogo.

    1945
     
  4. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1935
    UNITED STATES: Secretary of State Cordell Hull protests the Japanese-inspired autonomy movement in North China stating, "Political disturbances and pressures give rise to uncertainty and misgiving and tend to produce economic and social dislocations. They make difficult the enjoyment of treaty rights and the fulfillment of treaty obligations."


    1939
    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt asks for US$1.319 billion (US$18.55 billion in year 2005 dollars) out of his US$9 billion (US$126.45 billion in year 2005 dollars) budget to be spent on defence.

    1940
    CHINA: Japan appears to have lost control of large areas of northern China following a three-month offensive by Chinese Communist troops of the Eighth Route Army to disrupt Japanese installations in the region. Within the last few days there have been signs that the exhausted Communists are winding down the operation, known as the Hundred Regiments campaign, in the belief it has achieved its political aim of disrupting talks between Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists and Japan. The campaign, has seen Chinese troops abandon hit and run tactics for outright confrontation. Among the most heavily damaged are the Peking-Hankow railway, cut in 86 places, and the Anshan steel mills in Manchukuo. According to Communist estimates, Japan's North China Army has lost at least five battalions. However, internal critics fear that the extravagant use of manpower - with the Chinese outnumbering the Japanese by ten to one - is too expensive with Communist casualties of 22,000.

    1941
    ALASKA: Two U.S. Army War Plans Division representatives visiting bases in Alaska note that housing is vulnerable to aerial bombing, antiaircraft artillery is inadequate, roads are insufficient, and storage facilities are inadequate. They recommend that the War Department remedy these deficiencies as quickly as possible.

    EAST INDIES: The Netherlands East Indies and Australia have a long-standing agreement to aid each other in the event of war. Today, the Australians are asked to send aircraft to Dutch Timor because of Japanese ship and troop movements.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: The U.S. Navy's Task Force 12 (Rear Admiral Raymond Spruance), comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Lexington; the heavy cruisers USS Astoria, Chicago, and Portland; and the destroyers USS Drayton, Flusser, Lamson, Mahan, and Porter, depart Pearl Harbor Lexington is carrying 18 Vought SB2U-3 Vindicators of Marine Scout Bombing Squadron Two Hundred Thirty One (VMSB-231) which are to be flown off to reinforce Midway Island. The plan is to approach within 400 miles of Midway and fly the Marine squadron off to land on the island; this position would be reached by mid-morning on 7 December. After launching the Marine aircraft, Lexington would be free to continue training/scouting.
    Communication Intelligence Summary, December 5, 1941: General.-Traffic volume heavy. All circuits overloaded with Tokyo broadcast going over full 24 hours. Tokyo-Mandates circuit in duplex operation. There were several new intercept schedules heard. OMINATO radio working SAMA and BAKO sending fleet traffic. The Takao broadcast handling traffic Second and Third Fleet while the Tokyo broadcast is still handling traffic for these units also. It is noted that some traffic being broadcast is several days old which indicates the uncertainty of delivery existing in the radio organization. There were many messages of high precedence which appears to be caused by the jammed condition of all circuits. A plain language message was sent by the Captain, OKAWA from Tokyo to Takao probably for further relay addressed to FUJIHARA, Chief of the Political Affairs Bureau saying that "in reference to the Far Eastern Crisis, what you said is considered important at this end but proceed with
    what you are doing, specific orders will be issued soon."
    - Combined Fleet.- Neither the Second or Third Fleet Commanders have originated any traffic today. They are still frequently addressed but are receiving their traffic over broadcast. They are undoubtedly in Takao area or farther south since the Takao broadcast handles nearly all their traffic. No traffic from the Commander Carriers or Submarine Force has been seen either.
    - Third Fleet.- In one WE address a "Chief of Staff" sent a message to "Commander Fourteenth Army abroad RYUJOMARU in Third Fleet. HITOYO.GUN.SATI (IRO 1 REUZEU MARU). A number of MARUS have been addressing the CINC. Third Fleet.
    - Fourth Fleet.- The Secretary, Fourth Fleet and Staff Communication Officer the Fourth Fleet were addressed at Jaluit today strengthening the impression at the CinC. Fourth Fleet is in the Marshalls. The Commander of the South China Fleet has been addressing Palao radio and the RNO TAIHOKU and the Commander Second Fleet.
    - South China.-SAMA addressed much traffic to CinC. Second Fleet. BAKO continues as an active originator with many dispatches to Second and Third Fleet. The Commander Combined Air Force appears to be busy with the movement of Air Corps. SHIOGAMA Air and at least two unidentified corps are moving, probably to Indo-China.


    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Admiral Sir Tom Phillips, RN, commander of the British Eastern Fleet, meets with Lieutenant General Douglas MacArthur, commander of the U.S .Army Forces Far East, and Admiral Thomas C. Hart, commander of the Asiatic Fleet, at Cavite, Luzon. Phillips requests assignment of two USN destroyer divisions to operate with the battleship HMS Prince of Wales (53) and the battlecruiser HMS Repulse (34) now at Singapore, Malaya. Hart demurs.
    Admiral Hart receives a message from Captain John Creighton, USN, his liaison officer in Singapore, that the British have been informed by the U.S. government that the U.S. would enter the war on the British side if one of several possibilities occurred. Hart requests further information from the Navy Department.


    UNITED STATES: Japanese Ambassador NOMURA Kichisaburo and special envoy KURUSU Saburo meet with Secretary of State Cordell Hull and hand him the following note: "Reference is made to your inquiry about the intention of the Japanese Government with regard to the reported movements of Japanese troops in French Indo-china. Under instructions from Tokyo I wish to inform you as follows. As Chinese troops have recently shown frequent signs of movements along the northern frontier of French Indo-china bordering on China, Japanese troops, with the object of mainly taking precautionary measures, have been reinforced to a certain extent in the northern part of French Indo-china. As a natural sequence of this step, certain movements have been made among the troops stationed the southern part of the said territory. It seems that an exaggerated report has been made of these movements. It should be added that no measure has been taken on the part of the Japanese Government that may transgress the stipulations of the Protocol of Joint Defense between Japan and France."
    In the San Francisco, California, area, harbor defenses are on full war alert and the troops are each issued 40 rounds of small-arms ammunition.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: Reconnaissance missions over Attu, Agattu, the Semichis, Amchitka and Kiska Islands turns up nothing. Seven B-24s and nine B-26s escorted by 16 P-38s take off upon a Navy PBY report of a surface force southeast of Amchitka Island. At the interception point, the area is searched without results. The PBY pilot later report he saw "clouds."

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: B-24s bomb Kavieng Airfield on the east coast of New Ireland Island.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Army Forces in South Pacific Area) The following Seventh Air Force units are transferred to the Army Forces in South Pacific Area: 5th BG with its 23d, 31st, 72d and 394th Bombardment Squadrons with B-17s. The 394th is enroute from Hawaii to Fiji; all others are on Espiritu Santo Island, New Hebrides Islands with the 72d Bomb Sq operating from Guadalcanal. 11th BG with its 26th, 42d, 98th and 431st Bombardment Squadrons with B-17s. The 26th is on Efate Is while the 42d and 98th are on Espiritu Santo Is, all in the New Hebrides Islands. The 431st is on Viti Levu on Fiji. 12th Fighter Squadron, 15th FG with P-39s and the 44th Fighter Squadron, 318th FG with P-40s, both on Efate Island, New Hebrides Islands.

    NEW GUINEA: In the Australian 7th Division Gona area of Papua New Guinea, the Australian 21st Brigade, maintains pressure on the Japanese; the 25th Brigade withdraws for Port Moresby. A battalion of the 21st Brigade, supported by elements of the 39th Battalion, 30th Brigade, moves east to keep the Japanese from Basabua anchorage while the rest of the the 39th Battalion advances west because of Japanese landings at the Kumusi River mouth.
    A roadblock on the Soputa- Sanananda trail remains under severe pressure, and food and ammunition of the garrison are dwindling rapidly. The Japanese turn back a supply party attempting to reach the block and again repel frontal and flanking attacks toward it.
    After an air and artillery preparation, the Urbana Force and Warren Force launch all-out attacks. A company of the Urbana Forces U.S. 126th Infantry Regiment drives to within 50 yards of Buna Village; others break through to the sea; still others invest the west bank of Entrance Creek except for Coconut Grove. Buna Village is completely isolated.
    The Warren Force attack, although preceded by five Bren-gun carriers which are destroyed, is a total failure except on the left, where slight progress is made toward the bridge between the airstrips. The Warren Force suffers heavily from the Japanese as well as intense heat.
    In the air over Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20s and B-25s pound the Buna area.

    UNITED STATES: Japanese-American Fred Tayama, an informant for the FBI, is attacked and seriously injured by a group of inmates at the Manzanar Relocation Camp For Ethnic Japanese, located 50 miles south of Bishop, California. The arrest of the popular Harry Ueno who was accused in the attack on Tayama, triggers a mass uprising.
    Headquarters USAAF inactivates the I Concentration Command. This unit was tasked for the final preparation for unit movements overseas and this task is now assigned to the First through Fourth Air Forces and the Air Transport Command.
    The Selective Service System is placed under the War Manpower Commission by Presidential executive order.

    1943
    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In Burma during the night of 5/6 Dec, B-24's mine waters in the Moulmein area while 5 others lay mines in the Rangoon River.

    INDIA: Japanese bombers make their first strategic daylight raid on Calcutta damaging dock area; 500 people are killed or injured in the attack.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): 16 P-40's over the Changte area damage several large supply sampans near Ansiang and strafe various targets of opportunity in the Tehshan and Hsutu Lake areas; 20+ P-40's on patrols over the Changte area attack numerous boats and other targets throughout the nearby lake region.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, the Japanese rearguard has orders stating "while avoiding any decisive engagement" to "carry out successive resistance to try to delay enemy advance." The rearguard is positioned at any natural obstacle while the main body of the Japanese 20th Division hurries north from Wateo.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomon , 23 B-25's and 20+ USN dive bombers hit the Monoitu, Aitara Mission, and Mosigetta area; fighter patrols hit several areas on Bouga
    inville and on Shortland, including Chabai, Numa Numa, Mosigetta, Monoitu, and Faisi.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: USN destroyers bombard the Choiseul Bay area on Choiseul Island.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 40 B-24'a bomb Cape Gloucester on New Britain in the Bismarck Archipelago; A-20's destroy small craft off New Britain. In New Guinea, A-20's hit enemy forces in the Finschhafen area; B-25's, B-26's, and P-40's attack targets along the Bogadjim Road. The 110th Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter), 71st Reconnaissance Group, arrives at Brisbane, Queensland, Australia from the US with P-39Q's. The 531st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), (Heavy), transfers from Manbulloo to Long Strip with B-24's. The group is attached to the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

    1944

    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 6 B-24s off for a strike on Kakumabetsu in the Kurile Islands abort due to weather and B-25s cancel a shipping sweep.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 7 B-24s on sweeps over the Gulf of Tonkin, the S China Sea, and Formosa Strait bomb Ft Bayard, China and Kowloon Docks in Hong Kong and damage a freighter. 6 B-25s pound targets of opportunity from Liuchow to Liuchenghsien, China; 61 P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance hit river, road, and rail traffic and other targets of opportunity at scattered points mainly in S China.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command area, the Japanese send a strong Task Force toward Bhamo to assist the withdrawal of the beleaguered garrison. This force of about 3,000 starts north from Namhkam in the evening. The Chinese 30th Division continues a southward drive toward Namhkam against Japanese opposition from hill positions.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 31 fighter-bombers support ground forces in the Bhamo area; 25 fighter-bombers hit Hay-ti, Meza, and 3 other road bridges; 20+ fighter-bombers attack town areas, troop concentrations and storage facilities in or near Kawngwai, Kunmong, Settawagon, and Thitpoklwin; 8 attack targets of opportunity along the Shwebo-Wuntho rail line; transports complete 285 sorties carrying troops to forward bases and dropping supplies to frontline forces; 10 B-25s bomb a communications center, supplies, and personnel concentration at Mogok; on this date Tenth AF aircraft begin Operation GRUBWORM, flying the Chinese 14th and 22d Divisions from Burma to China in preparation for the Yunnan campaign to counter a probable Japanese drive toward Kunming, China; the 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 8th Photographic Reconnaissance Group, moves from Barrackpore, India to Myitkyina with B-25s and F-5s (a detachment is operating from Chittagong); the 317th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando), 2d Air Commando Group, moves from Bikram, India to Myitkyina with C-47s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): P-47s from Saipan strafe the runway on Pagan.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s strike Galela Airfield on Galela Island, 20 miles from Morotai; and Djailolo and Hate Tabako Aerodromes on Halmahera Island. B-25s and A-20s lightly raid Kaoe Aerodrome and Miti Aerodrome on Miti Island off the east coast of Halmahera. B-25s hit Langoan Airfield on Celebes Island while B-24s flying in pairs hit targets of opportunity nearby and in northern Borneo.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Australian General Thomas Blamey, Commander in Chief Allied Land Forces Southwest Pacific Area and Commander in Chief Australian Military Force, and Lieutenant General Frank Berryman, Chief of Staff Advanced Headquarter Allied Land Forces Southwest Pacific Area, meet with U.S. General Douglas MacArthur, Commander in Chief Southwest Pacific Area, to discuss the forward movement of Australian troops to the Philippine Islands. The Australians receives "very little satisfaction" from the discussions, with MacArthur saying that he would probably want the Australian Imperial Force to clean up Luzon.
    On Leyte, the U.S. Sixth Army begins an offensive against Ormoc. In the X Corps area the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) is still stalemated on the ridge southeast of Limon. The 32d Infantry Division prepares to drive down Highway 2. In the XXIV Corps area, the 776th Amphibious Tank Battalion, moving north by sea beyond Balogo, lands in the Tabgas area to fire on hills in front of the 7th Infantry Division; the battalion continues northward by sea to reconnoiter the Calingatngan region, then returns to their bivouac area. The 7th Infantry Division attacks with the 184th Infantry Regiment on the left and 17th Infantry Regiment on the right: the 184th secures the line from the beach some 300 yards south of Balogo on the left to the heights southeast of the Palanas River on the right. The 17th Infantry Regiment takes the ridge west of Hill 918. The 77th Infantry Division, at the Tarragona beach assembly area on the east coast of Leyte, begins loading supplies and equipment for a landing below Ormoc.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces fighter-bombers over the central Philippines area hit Japanese positions, barges, and communications targets.
    USN submarine USS Hake lands supplies on Panay Island.

    1945
     
  5. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1932
    SWITZERLAND: The League of Nations Assembly holds its third special session of the year, under Paul Hymans of Belgium, in Geneva to continue deliberations on the Japanese occupation of Manchuria. The session ends on 9 December.


    1940
    JAPAN: The Japanese-Thai friendship pact is signed "as a result of Thailand's proposal for a nonaggression pact."


    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the South West Pacific, German armed merchant cruisers HK Orion sinks the 4,410 ton British freighter SS Triona with gunfire and torpedoes near the phosphate island of Nauru.

    1941
    CAROLINE ISLANDS: Two Japanese units depart the Palau Islands to participate in the invasion of the Philippine Islands:
    - The Japanese South Philippines Cover Unit under Rear Admiral TAKAGI Takeo consists of the small aircraft carrier HIJMS Ryujo, heavy cruisers HIJMS Myoko and Nachi, the light cruiser HIJMS Jinstu and seven destroyers. Aircraft from this force will attack Mindanao Island, Philippine Islands, on 8 December.
    - The North Philippines Cover Unit under Vice Admiral TAKASHASHI I. consisting of the heavy cruisers HIJMS Haguro and Mayo, the light cruiser HIJMS Kuma. These ships will be 200 miles W of Luzon on 8 December.


    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Tonight at the Hickam Field Officer's Club, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, the waitresses serving refreshments are clad in colorful Japanese kimonos.
    Many sailors and other enlisted men are enjoying this Saturday night with the "Battle of Music" performed by military bands. The winner is the band from the battleship USS Pennsylvania. Second place goes to the band of the Pennsylvania's sister ship, the battleship USS Arizona.
    The Japanese Consulate in Honolulu sends the following to the Foreign Office in Tokyo:
    "(1) On the evening of the 5th, among the battleships which entered port were and one submarine tender. The following ships were observed at anchor on the 6th: 9 battleships, 3 light cruisers, 3 submarine tenders 17 destroyers, and in addition there were 4 light cruisers, 2 destroyers lying at docks (the heavy cruisers and airplane carriers have all left).
    (2) 2. It appears that no air reconnaissance is being conducted by the fleet air arm."
    Communication Intelligence Summary, December 6, 1941: General.-Traffic volume very heavy with a great deal of old traffic being transmitted. Messages as far back as 1 December were seen in the traffic. This not believed an attempt to maintain a high traffic level but is the result of confusion in traffic routing with uncertainty of delivery. The stations now holding broadcasts are TOKYO (with 3 distinct and separate broadcasts), SAIPAN, OMINATO and TAKAO.
    Yesterday's high level of traffic from TOKYO originators was maintained with the Intelligence activity still sending periodic messages. Practically all of TOKYO's messages carry prefixes of high priority.
    - Combined Fleet.-Still no traffic from the Second and Third Fleet Commanders. These units are sending their traffic via the TAKAO and TOKYO broadcasts. The Commander in Chief Combined Fleet originated several messages to the Carriers, Fourth Fleet and the Major Commanders.
    - Fourth Fleet.-The Commander in Chief Fourth Fleet is again in the TRUK area. It is doubtful that he ever went to JALUIT although it is certain that some members of his staff were there over the past few days. There is a definite close association between the Third Base Force at PALAO and the forces in South China. This unit is constantly sending messages to the Chief of Staff the Second Fleet, Third Fleet, Indo-China Forces and BAKO. It is being almost entirely neglected by Commander in Chief Fourth Fleet under whose command it normally operates. RONGELAB radio addressed the PALAO weather observer.
    - Fifth Fleet.-This fleet appears dispersed about the JAPAN Sea with OMINATO broadcasting traffic for this unit.
    - Submarines.-The Commander Submarine Force originated two messages to his command. These are the first two originated since 1 December. He is definitely in the MARSHALLS.
    - South China.-Nothing new to report. BAKO, SAMA and TAKAO still sending many messages to the Task Force."

    JAPAN: The Foreign Office sends the following message to the Embassy in Washington, D.C.:
    (1) The Government has deliberated deeply on the American proposal of the 26th of November and as a result we have drawn up a memorandum for the United States contained in my separate message #902.
    (2) This separate message is a very long one. I will send it in fourteen parts and I imagine you will receive it tomorrow. However, I am not sure. The situation is extremely delicate, and when you receive it I want you to please keep it secret for the time being.
    (3) Concerning the time of presenting this memorandum to the United States, I will wire you in a separate message. However, I want you in the meantime to put it in nicely drafted form and make every preparation to present it to the Americans just as soon as you receive instructions." The first 13 parts are sent today; the 14th is sent tomorrow.

    MARSHALL ISLANDS: Three Japanese Navy submarines of the Interdiction Unit, Wake Invasion Group, South Seas Force, depart Kwajalein Atoll for Wake Island. They arrive off Wake on 10 December.


    PACIFIC OCEAN: At 1215 hours in the South China Sea, an Australian Hudson Mk. I of No. 1 Squadron RAAF based at Kota Bharu in northeastern Malaya, sights three Japanese ships about 161 nautical miles from the base. At 1230 hours, the same aircraft reports a convoy of a battleship, five cruisers, seven destroyers and 22 transports 226 nautical miles from the base. Other aircraft are dispatched to shadow the ships but fail to find them because the area is being battered by a monsoon.
    In the South China Sea, USN yacht USS Isabel (PY-10), which sailed from the Philippine Islands on 3 December for the coast of French Indochina, as part President Roosevelt's "defensive information patrol," is sighted by floatplane from Japanese seaplane carrier Kamikawa Maru about 199 nautical miles ENE of Nha Trang, French Indochina is position 13.24N, 112.21E. Later in the day, USS Isabel receives orders to return to Manila.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: USN Admiral Thomas C. Hart, commander of the Asiatic Fleet, informs Admiral Sir Tom Phillips, RN, commander of the British Eastern Fleet, when Lieutenant General Douglas MacArthur, commander of the U.S. Army Forces Far East, suggests that he remain in Manila and have a formal reception there, that Phillips ought to return to Singapore immediately if "you want to see your ships again" as war is imminent. Phillips returns to Singapore in the afternoon.


    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt sends a message to Japanese Emperor containing the following: "Developments are occurring in the Pacific area which threaten to deprive each of our nations and all humanity of the beneficial influence of the long peace between our two countries. . . . During the past few weeks it has become clear to the world that Japanese military, naval, and air forces have been sent to Southern Indochina in such large numbers as to create a reasonable doubt on the part of other nations that this continuing concentration in Indochina is not defensive in its character. . . the people of the Philippines, of the hundreds of Islands of the East Indies, of Malaya, and of Thailand itself are asking themselves whether these forces of Japan are preparing or intending to make attack in one or more of these many directions." There is no Japanese reply. The Japanese leaders feel that involving the Emperor is wrong and are resentful of this effort. Later the first 13 parts of a 14 part Japanese message are transmitted. Unknown to the Japanese, US codebreakers will intercept and decode this message.
    The Secretary of the Navy, Frank Knox, states that he is very proud to report that the US Navy is second to none. This statement will appear in the New York Times Sunday Edition, tomorrow. ". . . It is clear that a continuance of such a situation is unthinkable."
    President Roosevelt authorizes the Manhattan Engineering District. The secret U.S. project to build an atomic bomb, later to be called the Manhattan Project, is put under the direction of the Office of Scientific Research and Development.
    As a result of the U.K. declaring war on Finland, six Finnish ships in U.S. ports are placed under protective custody.
    The USAAF 4th Air Force in California participates in air defense exercise in the San Francisco, California, area. The exercise continues until 11 December.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: USAAF Eleventh Air Force aircraft fly reconnaissance over Attu, Agattu, Amchitka, Kiska and the Semichis Islands. The 18th Fighter Squadron, 343d FG with P-40s transfers from Alaska to Adak.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s bomb Lakunai Airfield and the town of Rabaul on New Britain Island.

    FIJI ISLANDS: USN tug USS Grebe grounds while attempting to float SS Thomas A. Edison at Vuata Vatoa. Salvage operations are broken up by a hurricane that destroys both ships on 1/2 January 1943.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Japanese frustrate an effort to supply the beleaguered roadblock on the Soputa-Sanananda trail with rations and ammunition. The garrison is near the end of its resources.
    The Urbana Force prepares for another attack on Buna Village and places the first "time on target" fire of the campaign on Buna Mission. Since frontal attacks by the Warren Force have been futile and costly, it is decided to soften Japanese positions by attrition and infiltration while awaiting the arrival of tanks. In the Gona area, three Australian battalions attack the town but the attack bogs down and one company is virtually wiped out.
    Fifth Air Force B-25s bomb Lae Aerodrome, Papua New Guinea. Amelia Earhart took off from this airfield in 1938.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: USAAF P-39s strafing Munda on New Georgia Island discover trucks, steam rollers and other construction equipment, and evidence of two airfields under construction. B-17s will bomb Munda 21 times in December and continue to hit it in January 1943, as the Japanese continue to work at building the airstrips despite the constant air strikes.

    UNITED STATES: At the Manzanar Relocation Camp For Ethnic Japanese, located 50 miles south of Bishop, California, the arrest of prisoners accused of beating informer Fred Tayama leads to a protest and violence. Military police fire into the crowd, killing two protesters and wounding at least ten more.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, Changte is pounded throughout the day by 30+ B-25's and numerous fighters; other fighters strafe targets of opportunity in the railway yard at Hsipaw and damage a train at Hopong.

    BURMA: During the night of 6/7 December, RAF Wellingtons bomb Moulmein.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 6 B-25's bomb the Monoitu Mission area, and 24 others, with fighter support, pound Tarlena village; P-40's carry out a strafing strike in the Arawa Bay area near Kieta; P-38's strafe W the coast of Buka ; fighter patrols strafe the Chabai, Koromira, and Monoitu areas; the Kieta supply area is bombed by a B-24 on armed reconnaissance. On Buka Island, P-38s strafe the west coast.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): Nearly 100 B-24's and B-25's hit the Cape Gloucester and Borgen Bay areas; P-40's strafe Cape Hoskins. In New Guinea. A-20's and B-25's attack villages and supply dumps around Finschhafen.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 4 B-24s bomb Suribachi Airfield on Paramushiru Island, scoring hits on the runway, and blast batteries; on the return flight, 1 is hit by AA fire. 1 B-25 flies a negative shipping search. A B-24 weather airplane force-lands in the USSR.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) area, the U.S. 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special), also known as the MARS Task Force, is ordered to relieve the Chinese 22d Division in the Mo-hlaing area, about 1 mile N of Tonk-wa. About this time, a Japanese task force starts across the Shweli River toward Tonk-wa.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In Burma, 8 P-51s attack road traffic in the Hsenwi area and from there to Wanling.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 9 P-47s damage a bridge at Namhkai and knock out a bridge at Mongmit; 10 B-25s knock out the main bridge at Bawgyo and damage the bypass; 15 P-47s support ground forces in the Bhamo area, 4 bomb Hsenwi Airfield, and 8 strafe Bawgyo AA positions; 12 P-47s hit troops, artillery, and supplies at Banmauk, the W side of Indawgyi Lake, and Namhkam. Transports fly 300 sorties to forward areas.


    21ST BOMBER COMMAND: The USAAF Twentieth Air Force's XXI Bomber Command in the Mariana Islands, dispatches three B-29 Superfortresses to fly a weather strike mission. These missions usually consist of two or three B-29s that gather weather information and drop incendiary bombs on cities to lower the morale of the civilian population.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 417th BG and the 672d, 673d, 674th and 675th Bombardment Squadrons move from Noemfoor to Tacloban with A-20s.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s hit airfields at Kendari and Borebore on Celebes Island. Fighter- bombers and B-25s attack Halmahera Island airfields while A-20s and B-25s bomb the Namlea area on Buru Island.

    PHILIPPINES ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte Island, repeated efforts of the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) to eliminate the Japanese on a ridge southeast of Limon fail. In the XXIV Corps area, the 7th Infantry Division continues their northward drive on Ormoc, taking Balogo, Hill 918, and Kang Dagit; some elements are on the Palanas River and others are on a ridge of Hill 380. The 77th Infantry Division loads for landing in Ormoc Bay at Deposito and sails with USN destroyers and USAAF Fifth Air Force protection for the target area. About 150 Japanese attack Buri airstrip, surprising the defense force and entering the woods north of the strip.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Bacalod Airfield on Negros Island. P-38s over Bacalod and others covering a convoy off southern Leyte Island claim several aircraft downed. B-25s, with P-47 support, hit Cagayan, Jacgol, and Del Monte Airfields on Mindanao Island.

    RAAF - Beaufighters sweep water craft sweep in the Celebes. Lost is Beaufighter A9-202.

    UNITED STATES: Bomb fragments of a 33 pound Japanese anti-personnel high explosive bomb is recovered at 1800 hours local about 15 miles NW of Thermopolis, Wyoming. Thermopolis is located about 110 miles NW of Casper, Wyoming. An explosion occurred followed by the sighting of what appeared to be a parachute descending to earth. A bright red flame was also seen by observers of the explosion.

    1945
     
  6. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1932
    SWITZERLAND: The majority of the delegates in the League of Nations Assembly who participated in the discussion of the Lytton Report (investigation of the Japanese invasion of Manchuria) held to the view that a resolution of censure against Japan was in order; the British, Australian, Canadian, and Italian delegates insist that the path to direct negotiation was still open; subsequently on 9 December a Committee of Nineteen was appointed "to study the Report of the Commission."


    1940
    PACIFIC OCEAN: Off Nauru Island, a 8 square mile island in the South Pacific Ocean, located about halfway between the Gilbert and Solomon Islands, the German auxiliary cruisers HK Komet and Orion intercept two freighters and the German crew board them. Explosive charges are placed aboard both ships, the 5,180 ton Norwegian SS Vinni and 3,900 ton British SS Komata, by the crew of HK Orion and both ships are sunk. The island is rich in phosphate deposits and both ships were about to load a cargo of phosphate.

    1941
    ALASKA: Upon learning of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Air Force, Alaska Defense Command's six B-18 Bolos and 12 P-36 Hawks take to the air to avoid being caught on their fields.

    CANADA: Under the War Measures Act, Order in Council P.C. 9591, all Japanese nationals and those naturalized after 1922 are required to register with the Registrar of Enemy Aliens.

    PEARL HARBOR: Many events happen here. It is beyond the scope of this thread to list them all.

    JAPAN: The Foreign Office sends the following message to the Japanese Ambassador in Washington, D.C.: "Will the Ambassador please submit to the United States Government (if possible to the Secretary of State) our reply to the United States at 1:00 p. m on the 7th, your time." A second message reads, "After deciphering part 14 of my (message) #902 [a] and also #907 , #908 [c] and #909 [d], please destroy at once the remaining cipher machine and all machine codes. Dispose in like manner also secret documents."

    MALAYA: Two RAF (PBY-5) Catalina Mk. I flying boats of No.205 Squadron, based at Seletar in Singapore, are despatched to shadow a Japanese convoy; one aircraft is lost to Japanese fighters.

    MIDWAY ISLANDS: At 2135 hours local, the islands are bombarded by the Japanese Midway Neutralization Unit consisting of destroyers HIJMS Ushio and Sazanami; Marine shore batteries of the 6th Defense Battalion return the fire, claiming damage to both ships. One of the USN submarines deployed on simulated war patrols off Midway, USS Trout (SS-202), makes no contact with the enemy ships; the other, USS Argonaut (SS-166), is unable to make a successful approach, and the two destroyers retire from the area. Subsequent bad weather will save Midway from a pounding by planes from the Pearl Harbor Attack Force as it returns to Japanese waters.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The 2,140 ton U.S. Army-chartered steam schooner Cynthia Olson is shelled and sunk by Japanese submarine HIJMS I-26 about 987 nautical miles nne of Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. There are 35 people aboard, 33 crewmen and two Army passengers. All are lost. She is the first U.S. merchant vessel sunk by a Japanese submarine in WWII.
    Light minelayer USS Gamble (DM-15) mistakenly fires upon submarine USS Thresher (SS-200) about 65 nautical miles (121 kilometers) west of Honolulu, Oahu, in position 21.15N, 159.01W. Thresher mistakes Gamble for destroyer USS Litchfield (DD-336) (the latter ship assigned to work with submarines in the Hawaiian operating area), the ship with which she is to rendezvous. USS Gamble, converted from a flush-deck, four-pipe destroyer, resembles USS Litchfield. Sadly, the delay occasioned by the mistaken identity proves fatal to a seriously injured sailor on board the submarine, who dies four hours before the boat finally reaches port on the 8th, of multiple injuries suffered on 6 December 1941 when heavy seas wash him against the signal deck rail.
    The first night recovery of aircraft in World War II by the U.S. Navy occurs when the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise turns on searchlights to aid returning SBDs and TBDs that had been launched at dusk in an attempt to find Japanese ships reported off Oahu. Friendly fire, however, downs four of Enterprise's six F4F Wildcats (the strike group escort) that are directed to land at NAS Ford Island in Pearl Harbor. Other Enterprise SBDs make a night landing at NAS Kaneohe Bay, miraculously avoiding automobiles and construction equipment parked on the ramp to prevent just such an occurrence.

    UNITED STATES: At 0900 hours local, the 14th part of the message from the Japanese Foreign Office to the embassy is received. The missing piece does not mention the attack, it merely says negotiations have come to a standstill and must be ended.
    The following is from a memorandum regarding a conversation, between the Secretary of State (Cordell Hull), the Japanese Ambassador (NOMURA), and Mr. KURUSU: "The Japanese Ambassador asked for an appointment to see the Secretary at 1:00 p.m., but later telephoned and asked that the appointment be postponed to 1:45 as the Ambassador was not quite ready.
    The Ambassador and Mr. Kurusu arrived at the Department at 2:05 p.m. and were received by the Secretary at 2:20. The Japanese Ambassador stated that he had been instructed to deliver at 1:00 p.m. the document which he handed the Secretary, but that he was sorry that he had been delayed owing to the need of more time to decode the message. The Secretary asked why he had specified one o'clock. The Ambassador replied that he did not know but that was his instruction. The Secretary said that anyway he was receiving the message at two o'clock.
    After the Secretary had read two or three pages he asked the Ambassador whether this document was presented under instructions of the Japanese Government. The Ambassador replied that it was. The Secretary as soon as he had finished reading the document turned to the Japanese Ambassador and said, "I must say that in all my conversations with you (the Japanese Ambassador) during the last nine months I have never uttered one word of untruth. This is borne out absolutely by the record. In all my fifty years of public service I have never seen a document that was more crowded with infamous falsehoods and distortions -- infamous falsehoods and distortions on a scale so huge that I never imagined until today that any Government on this planet was capable of uttering them."
    The Ambassador and Mr. Kurusu then took their leave without making any comment." The Japanese had handed Secretary Hull the so-called "Fourteen Point message" which is not a declaration of war; it merely declares an impasse in the ongoing diplomatic negotiations.
    The Imperial Rescript declaring a state of war between the Japanese Empire and the U.S. is not issued until the next day, in Tokyo. [The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, took place on 7 December, at 1320 hours, Washington time (0750 hours, Honolulu time), which was 8 December, 0320 hours, Tokyo time. On 8 December at 0600 hours, Tokyo time (7 December, 1600 hours, Washington time), the Japanese imperial headquarters announced that war began as of "dawn" on that date.]
    President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders mobilization of the armed forces.
    Local authorities and the F.B.I. begin to round up the leadership of the Japanese American communities. Within 48 hours, 1,291 Issei (Japanese-born immigrant) are in custody. These men are held under no formal charges and family members are forbidden from seeing them. Most would spend the war years in Japanese alien internment camps run by the Justice Department.
    In a scheduled baseball game, the Paramount Pictures team is playing the Japanese-American Los Angeles Nippons. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is announced in the third inning but the game continues with Paramount wining 6-3.
    Movie (cinema) attendance dropped dramatically today, with revenues dipping 50 percent at some theaters.


    1942
    U.S.A.: The USS New Jersey BB-62 is launched from the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. This battleship is one of the Iowa class. One year after the "day of infamy" at Pearl Harbor, the US Navy today launched 15 ships, including the biggest battleship ever built. The huge USS New Jersey slid down the ways at the Philadelphia Navy Yard almost on the hour of last December's attack.
    Elsewhere in America, an aircraft carrier, two destroyers, a submarine, six minesweepers, two escort craft, a destroyer tender and what the navy called a "special" ship were launched. All this was a tangible demonstration of Franklin D. Roosevelt's message to the people: that the day of surprise
    was a year ago, the period of defence is over and the offensive is under way.
    "Coral Sea, Midway, the Solomons, New Guinea and North Africa are shining examples of [our] power," the president said. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the chief of the Pacific Fleet, said that victory has been assured over the Japanese because the "sea lane across the greatest of oceans has been made safe.
    The optimism is tempered by official statistics: 58,307 casualties in the year, a massive 35,822 of which occurred in the Pacific theatre. Many are classified as missing and presumed to be prisoners of war. More than one million US servicemen are now in action.

    NEW GUINEA: US forces hold against stiff Japanese counterattacks at Bun. George Welch, who is credited with shooting down four Japanese planes during the attack on Pearl Harbor shoots down two Vals and a Zeke flying a P-39, becoming an ace exactly one year after his first victories. Welch was credited with shooting down 4 Japanese planes during the attack on Pearl Harbor . He would go on to score 16 victories and become a test pilot for North American Aviation.
    All of Welch's victorys were multiples: 7 Dec. 41: 4; 7 Dec. 42: 3; 21 Jun 43: 2; 20 Aug 43: 3; 2 Sep 43: 4.

    SINGAPORE:Changi: A beautiful shinto shrine, built by PoWs is unveiled in the camp.

    GUADALCANAL: Captain Sato leads a Tokyo Express run to Guadalcanal tonight. US PT Boats force his destroyers to retire. In the Solomons, 13 SBDs attack the Tokyo Express; three destroyers are damaged for the loss of one SBD.

    ALASKA: (Eleventh Air Force) A reconnaissance mission is flown over the Semichis and Attu Islands; reconnaissance of Kiska Is is aborted due to weather.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Army Forces in South Pacific Area) The 69th Bombardment Squadron, 38th BG with B-26s moves from New Caledonia Island to Efate Island, New Hebrides Islands.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): During the night of 6/7 Dec, 14 B-24's, staging through Tarawa Atoll, hit targets on Maloelap and Wotje. 6 B-24's from Nukufetau in the Ellice bomb Maloelap Atoll, and 1 other, failing to reach the primary, drops bombs on Mille Atoll. This date marks the beginning of Operation FLINTLOCK (operations against Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls in the Marshalls).

    BURMA: Eight USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-40s strafe freight cars between Mogaung and Myitkyina.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, Changte is hit twice by a total of 13 B-25's and several escorting fighters. In Burma, 8 P-40's strafe freight cars between Mogaung and Myitkyina. The detachment of the 76th Fighter Squadron, 23d Fighter Group, that has been operating from Suichwan, China since Oct, returns to it's base at Kweilin with P-40's.

    CEYLON: Since British Admiral Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Commander Southeast Asia Command, is ordered to release a large portion of his amphibious resources for use elsewhere, planning is begun for a limited operation (PIGSTICK) on the south Mayu Peninsula in Burma on the Bay of Bengal as a substitute for Operation BUCCANEER (amphibious operation in the Andaman Islands), subject to approval of Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 8 B-25's carry out strikes against Kahili and Kieta Harbor. Torokina is bombed by 2 Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) Ventura's on patrol. The 23d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 5th BG (Heavy), based on Espiritu Santo in the New Hebrides with B-24's, ceases operating from Guadalcanal in the Solomon .

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): On New Britain in the Bismarck Archipelago, 90+ B-24's and B-25's attack the Cape Gloucester and Borgen Bay areas. On New Guinea, A-20's bomb troop encampments and dumps in the Finschhafen area; P-40's strafe boats and barges near Madang. During the night of 7/8 December, 26 Australian Beauforts attack Borpop Aerodrome on New Ireland Island.

    NEI: B-24's bomb the airfield and village on Haroekoe in the Moluccas.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 9 bombers fly 2 negative shipping searches.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 8 B-25s hit a storage area at Lashio, Burma. In China, 4 B-25s and 8 P-40s attack and considerably damage Sankiao; 4 B-25s, operating individually, attack truck convoys and other targets of opportunity in the Hengyang area and in Siang-Chiang Valley; 2 B-24s claim 1 cargo vessel sunk in the S China Sea while 15 P-51s hit shipping at Hong Kong, claiming a destroyer and freighter sunk; 65 P-51s, P-40s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance over wide areas of China attack storage areas, troops, bridges, railroad targets, and gun positions around Paoching, Anking, Hengyang, Tuhshan, Nan Tan, Kengtung, and Luchai and between Kweilin and Liuchow.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 9 B-25s knock out the E span of the road bridge at Tonbo; 21 P-47s support ground forces in the Bhamo area; 63 blast concentrations of enemy troops and supplies at Male while 4 others hit supplies at Myauk-le; 14 P-47s knock out a bridge at Mansam and damage 3 bridges at Mongmit and Namyao; 17 others hit Nawnghkio and bomb supply areas at Na-kawnkongnyauiig. Transports fly 267 sorties to forward areas. The 16th Combat Cargo Squadron, 4th Combat Cargo Group, arrives at Sylhet, India from the US with C-46s.

    JAPAN: American troops waging war against Japan in the Pacific have come to know one Japanese voice better than any other. It belongs to "Tokyo Rose", an American citizen of Japanese parentage featured in regular propaganda broadcasts to the Allied troops by the Japanese Broadcasting Company. Her message is not always very subtle; in a sexy, sultry voice she tells the GIs that the girls they left behind are being unfaithful. "Rose's" real name is Iva Ikuko Toguri d'Aquino.

    MARIANA ISLANDS: Several "Betty" bombers based on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, strafe airfields on Saipan at 0404 hours. In the afternoon, 13 "Betty" bombers bomb the bases at 1435 hours; six of the aircraft are shot down by antiaircraft fire but three B-29s are destroyed, three are seriously damaged and 20 are slightly damaged.

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 19: 108 B-29s, operating from Chengtu, China, are dispatched to bomb the Manchuria Airplane Manufacturing Company and an adjacent arsenal at Mukden; 80 hit primary target and 10 other B-29s bomb a rail yard short of the primary target, and several other bombers strike alternate targets; the B-29s claim 10-10-30 fighters; 7 B-29s are lost.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): Immediately following an enemy bombing raid on Saipan, 4 P-47s fly reconnaissance over Pagan searching for aircraft but observe none.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces (FEAF), B-25s hit Miti (Miti Island), Kaoe and Lolobata Airdromes on Halmahera Island and Galela Airfield on Galela Island.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area, the Japanese continue to cling stubbornly to the ridge southeast of Limon, preventing the 2d Squadron, 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) from advancing. The 1st Squadron reaches the Leyte River, where it makes contact with Troop A and 126th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division. In the XXIV Corps area, USN Task Group Task Group 78.3 lands troops of the 77th Infantry Division at Deposito on the eastern shore of Ormoc Bay. Leyte, at 0707 hours after a bombardment by destroyers and LCI(R)s; the troops move inland at once, at 0707 307th Infantry Regiment clearing Ipil and at the 305th Infantry Regiment reaching the Bagonbon River. The 7th Infantry Division pushes on toward Ormoc, the 184th Infantry Regiment reaching the Tabgas River and the 17th Infantry Regiment taking Hill 380. This virtually completes the battle of the ridges, although fighting continues for several days before the division reaches its objective, the
    Talisayan River. Fighting continues in the Buro Airstrip area. The 1st Battalion, 149th Infantry Regiment, 38th Infantry Division, gains a hold on the southwestern edge, making contact with the 1st Battalion, 187th Glider Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division.
    Within three hours of the first soldiers' going ashore, however, enemy air attacks begin. Kamikazes damage destroyers USS Mahan and Lamson; USS Mahan is scuttled about off Ormoc by destroyer USS Walke; destroyer USS Flusser and rescue tug ATR-31 extinguish USS Lamson's fires and she is towed to Leyte Gulf. Other suiciders damage high speed transports USS Ward and Liddle; Ward is scuttled by destroyer USS O'Brien. Still other kamikazes damage tank landing ship USS LST-737, sink medium landing ship LSM-318 and damage (by near-misses) LSM-18 and LSM-19.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces (FEAF) B-24s bomb Malogo Airfield, the town of Masbate on Masbate Island, and Sanbon Field on the southeastern tip of Luzon Island. Other FEAF aircraft fly armed reconnaissance and harassing missions over Mindanao Island attacking various targets of opportunity.
    Opposing the 8th phase of the TA Operation, USAAF Fifth Air Force fighter-bombers and USMC Corsairs attack Japanese shipping in San Isidro Bay, Leyte, sinking a fast transport and four army cargo ships; and damaging the escort destroyers HIJMS Ume and Sugi. .
    Both USAAF Majors Richard I. Bong and Thomas B. McGuire shoot down two Japanese aircraft while covering American landings at Ormoc, Leyte Island. Bong gets his 37th and 38th victories when he shoots down a "Sally" bomber and a "Tojo" fighter. McGuire shoots down two "Tojo" fighters for his 29th and 30th victories.

    1945

     
  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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  8. jemimas_special2

    jemimas_special2 Shepherd

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    Opana...

    Great link ;) Still analyzing the documents.... believe I'm on doc 12 of 430+ thanks for sharing.

    all the best,

    Jem
     
  9. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I should point out that the Imperial Rescript gave the Japanese permission to go to war. The declaration of war on the US, UK and Netherlands was a separate document.
     
  10. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1941
    ALASKA: Starting today, Air Force, Alaska Defense Command B-18 Bolos fly armored reconnaissance each morning from Elmendorf Field, Anchorage, to Kodiak Island in the Aleutian Islands.

    CHINA: Japanese troops seize the International Settlement at Shanghai, and many ships are sunk or captured in its harbor.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: A company of the Japanese Army's 51st Guard Force occupies Makin Atoll.

    HONG KONG: The Royal Rifles of Canada and Winnipeg Grenadiers, under command of Brigadier J.K. Lawson are caught by the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong; have not received training as front-line troops. The first Canadian units to fight in World War II have almost no air or naval defences and at 0800 hours, Japanese aircraft destroy all six RAF planes at Kai Tak airport. Two men of the Royal Canadian Signals are wounded, the first Canadian casualties in the camp at Sham Shui Po, as the Japanese 38th Division moves across the frontier of the New Territories.

    INTERNATIONAL: Declarations of war:
    - Belgium, Colombia and Mexico break diplomatic relations with Japan.
    - The Free French National Council declares war on Germany.
    - Manchukuo declares war on the U.S.
    - The Union of South Africa declares war on Finland, Hungary, Japan and Romania.
    - The U.S., U.K., Australia, Costa Rica, The Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, The Netherlands, New Zealand and Nicaragua declare war on Japan.

    MALAYA: The Japanese invade Malaya early in the morning, landing on the east coast near Kota Bharu after a naval bombardment of beaches, and are vigorously engaged by Lieutenant General A. E. Percival's Malaya Command. The Indian III Corps (under Lieutenant General Sir Lewis Heath), which is responsible for all Malaya north of Johore and Malacca, employs the Indian 9th Division against the Japanese in the Kota Bharu area and sends the Indian 11th Division, already poised to move into Thailand, across the border to delay the Japanese on the roads to Singora and Patani.
    The Indian 9th Division, whose primary mission is to protect the three airfields in Kelantan (Kota Bharu, Gong Kedah, and Machang), fights a losing battle for Kota Bharu, from which it starts withdrawing during the night of 8/9 December. One Indian 11th Division column, driving toward Singora, engages a tank-supported Japanese force 10 miles north of the frontier; another, advancing toward Patani, is opposed only by the Thai police forces. In conjunction with ground attacks, Japanese planes strike repeatedly at airfields in northern Malaya and greatly reduce the strength of the RAF Far East Command. The RAF, after attacking Japanese shipping and troops in the Kota Bharu area, withdraws from the Kelantan airfields to Kuantan, far to the south.
    Singapore, the ultimate objective of the Japanese 25th Army in Malaya, is also attacked by air. Seven Australian Hudson Mk. Is of No. 1 Squadron RAAF, attack the Japanese invasion force laying off Kota Bharu and sink one transport and damage two other transports and numerous barges. RAAF Hudson Mk. IIs of No. 8 Squadron and RAF Blenheim Mk. Is and Vildebeest Mk. IIIs also attack the invasion force damaging numerous barges.
    The British Navy's Force Z under Admiral Tom Phillips gets underway in the evening to find the Japanese fleet. The force consists of the battleship HMS Prince of Wales (53), battlecruiser HMS Repulse (34) and British destroyers HMS Electra (H 27), Express (H 61) and Tenedos (H04) and Australian destroyer HMAS Vampire (D 68 ).

    MARIANA ISLANDS: On Guam, Japanese aircraft bomb the island at 0827 and 1700 hours local. After getting underway and being attacked by Japanese aircraft, the USN minesweeper USS Penguin (AM-33), is scuttled in 1,200 feet of water about 1.5 miles off Guam to prevent capture.

    OCEANIA: Japanese aircraft bomb phosphate rick Ocean Island and Nauru Island in the South Pacific Ocean Island is a 1,500 acre island about 242 nautical miles WSW of Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands. Nauru Island is a 8 square mile island about 380 nautical miles WSW of Tarawa Atoll.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The first word of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is received on Luzon by commercial radio at about 0330 hours local. Within 30 minutes radar at Iba Field, Luzon, plots a formation of airplanes 75 miles offshore, heading for Corregidor Island.
    P-40s are sent out to intercept but make no contact. Shortly before 0930 hours, after Japanese aircraft are detected over Lingayen Gulf heading toward Manila, B-17s at Clark Field, Luzon, are ordered airborne to prevent being caught on the ground. Fighters from Clark and Nichols Fields are sent to intercept the Japanese but do not make contact. The Japanese airplanes swing east and bomb military installations at Baguio, Tarlac, Tuguegarao, and an airfield at Cabantuan.
    By 1130 hours, the B-17s and fighters sent into the air earlier have landed at Clark and Iba Fields for refueling, and radar has disclosed another flight of Japanese aircraft 70 miles W of Lingayen Gulf, headed south. Fighters from Iba Field make a fruitless search over the South China Sea. Fighters from Nichols Field are dispatched to patrol over Bataan and Manila. Around 1145 hours a formation is reported headed south over Lingayen Gulf. Fighters are ordered from Del Carmen Field to cover Clark Field but fail to arrive before the Japanese hit Clark shortly after 1200 hours.
    B-17s and many fighters at Clark Field are caught on the ground, but a few P-40s manage to get airborne. Second Lieutenant Randall B Keator of the 20th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor), 24th Pursuit Group (Interceptor), shoots down the first Japanese aircraft over the Philippines.
    The P-40s earlier sent on patrol of the South China Sea return to Iba Field with fuel running low at the beginning of a Japanese attack on that airfield. The P-40s fail to prevent bombing but manage to prevent low-level strafing of the sort which proved so destructive at Clark Field.
    At the end of the day's action it is apparent that the Japanese have won a major victory. The effective striking power of Far East Air Force has been destroyed, the fighter strength has been seriously reduced, most B-17 maintenance facilities have been demolished, and about 90 men have been killed.

    THAILAND: Some Japanese from French Indochina cross into Thailand and drive on Bangkok against negligible resistance. Others land unopposed at Singora and Patani on the east coast and start southwest across the Kra Isthmus to assist in conquest of Malaya.

    UNITED KINGDOM: Prime Minister Winston Churchill begins making plans to visit U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in Washington, D.C. Roosevelt suggests a meeting for mid-January but Churchill is anxious to meet quickly in order to establish at least two priorities: the importance of the naval situation and primacy of Europe in the American war effort.

    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt addresses a joint session of the U.S. Congress requesting a declaration of war against Japan but not Germany or Italy. His speech is broadcast over the radio and is heard by 62.1 million people.
    The Congress approves stating, "Whereas the Imperial Government of Japan has committed unprovoked acts of war against the Government and the people of the United States of America: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the state of war between the United States and the Imperial Government of Japan which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the United States and the resources of the Government to carry on war against the Imperial Government of Japan; and, to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by, the Congress of the United States." This was approved today at 1610 Eastern time.
    The Commanding General 1st Air Force orders the I Bomber Command to begin overwater reconnaissance with all available aircraft to locate and attack any hostile surface forces which might approach the east coast. Similar reconnaissance is ordered off the west coast.
    The Southeast Pacific Area is established with Rear Admiral Abel T. Bidwell in command.

    WAKE ISLAND: At 1158 hours local, 34 "Nell" bombers of the Chitose Kokutai (Naval Air Corps)
    based on Roi Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, attack the island at an altitude of 13,000 feet destroying seven of the eight F4F-3 Wildcats on the ground. The island is defended by 449 Marines of the Marine Detachment, 1st Defense Battalion, Wake Island, 69 Navy personnel and five USAAF communicators. The five Air Force enlisted airmen form a detachment of the 407th Signal Company, Aviation, based at Hickam Field, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, and had been sent to Wake in early November 1941 to establish a radio station to guide B-17 Flying Fortresses on flights from the U.S. to the Philippine Islands.

    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: An attempted bombing mission of Attu and Kiska Islands by six Eleventh Air Force B-24s and six B-26s, escorted by eight P-38s, is forced back by weather. An uneventful reconnaissance is flown by a B-24 and a B-26 over Attu, Agattu, Amchitka, Kiska and the Semichis Islands.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: Fifth Air Force B-24s bomb the airfield at Gasmata on the southern coast of New Britain Island.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Australian 39th Battalion, 7th Division, supported by artillery and mortars, attacks Gona and by nightfall, half of the Japanese perimeter defenses and the center of the garrison area have been taken. During the night of 8/9 December, the Japanese try to withdraw from Gona to Giruwa and about 100 of them are killed.
    An Allied supply party reaches the roadblock on the Soputa-Sanananda trail against bitter opposition. Urbana Force continuing the battle for Buna Village, concentrates on a bunker position on the southern edge. Newly arrived flame throwers proves so ineffective that the weapon is not used again during the campaign.
    The Japanese fail in an attempt to reinforce the garrison of the village with troops from the mission. On the Warren Force front, preparations are made to move guns closer to the Japanese bunkers as two more 25-pounder (88 mm) guns arrive by sea. The Navy agrees to provide corvettes for movement of fresh troops to Warren front.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20s and B-25s pound antiaircraft positions at Buna and the area around Buna Mission and Cape Endaiadere as ground forces attack bunker positions on the southern end of Buna. P-38s hit a wrecked vessel off Gona. Six Japanese destroyers carrying troops to reinforce the Buna-Gona beachhead are bombed by B-17s and a lone B-24 and turn back to Rabaul, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Regimental Combat Team 132 (--), Americal Division, lands on Guadalcanal. This brings the Americal Division to full strength.

    UNITED STATES: The Joint Chiefs of Staff present to President Franklin D. Roosevelt a proposal for the recapture of all Burma, Operation ANAKIM. The President agrees that Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell, Commanding General U.S. China-Burma- India Theater of Operations, Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek, and Commander in Chief Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC), must be provided means for his part of the operation in northern Burma, Operation RAVENOUS.

    1943
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 3 B-24's fly armed reconnaissance. During the night of 8/9 Dec, another B-24 off on a photographic mission over Kasatochi in the Aleutian , turns back because of mechanical trouble.

    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 22 B-24's from Nanumea bomb Jaluit Atoll, and 11 from Canton bomb Mille Atoll.

    USN - A striking force of two carriers, six battleships, and 12 destroyers bombed and bombarded enemy installations on Nauru.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 9 B-25's, escorted by 16 P-40's, pound Changte; 9 other B-25's bomb Hofuh and the 16 escorting P-40's bomb 2 villages to the N.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): Fighter patrols and aircraft on armed reconnaissance bomb and strafe several targets of opportunity near Kieta, SE of Cape Torokina, at Baniu Plantation, and along the NE coast.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-25's attack the Penfoei-Koepanp area on Timor . In New Guinea, B-25's and B-26's pound enemy supply dumps on the Huon Peninsula near Finschhafen; P-39's strafe barges from Saidor to Fortification Point.

    USN: Shot down by anti-aircraft fire over Nauru are F6F Hellcat 26088 and TBF 47589.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 4 B-25s hit the Nan Tan area, killing many horses; 14 P-51s hit the airfield and other targets at Nanking, claiming 24 airplanes, a freighter, and 2 locomotives destroyed; 15 P-40s blast railroad targets and buildings from Nan Tan area to Liuchow; 25 P-51s hit Hochih and troops, warehouses, trucks and ammunition dump in the area; 20+ other fighter-bombers on armed reconnaissance hit various targets of opportunity around the Lipo, Shihhweiyao, Tuhshan, Santon, Paoching, Hengyang, Taiyuan, and Linfen areas.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command area, the Japanese take Tonkwa from the outnumbered Chinese.
    In the British Fourteenth Army area, IV Corps headquarters moves from Imphal, India, to Tamu and is placed under Lieutenant General Frank Messervy, who succeeds Lieutenant General Sir Geoffrey Scoones. The corps is to move secretly southward down the Gangaw Valley to the
    southern flank of the army, where it will seize a bridgehead over the Irrawaddy River in the Pakokku area and thrust toward Meiktila and Thazi.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 30+ P-47s support ground forces in the Bhamo area; 28 hit supply areas at Kyingyi, Loi-lun, and Hke-hkun; 12 bomb troop concentrations at Namti and 4 hit village on the Nawnghkem River; 16 fighter-bombers attack a Shwebo motor pool and radio station while 6 others hit the Namun ferry landing; 7 aircraft knock out a bypass bridge at Namhkai and 8 fighter-bombers hit railroad targets of opportunity between Sedaw and Nawnghkio. Large-scale transport operations continue.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 89 B-24s from Guam and Saipan join B-29s and naval vessels in bombarding Iwo Jima airfields; 28 P-38s escort the B-29s; the strikes are aimed at reducing the raids against US bases in the Marianas.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 11: 82 B-29s from the Mariana join Seventh AF P-38s, B-24s and Navy cruisers in a strike against airfields on Iwo Jima from which Japanese strikes against US airfields in the Mariana Islands are being launched; 61 B-29s bomb the airfields and 4 bomb other targets without loss; [Japanese aircraft strike the Mariana airfields on 2, 7, and 27 Nov, 7 and 25 Dec (the largest attack 25 aircraft), and from 25 Dec 44 to 2 Jan 45 in very minor degrees; altogether about 80 Japanese aircraft attack, and nearly 40 are downed; 11 B-29s are destroyed and 43 damaged on the ground in these attacks].

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, over 60 USAAF Far East Air Forces (FEAF) B-25s and fighter-bombers, along with Australian aircraft, hit airfield and various other targets on Halmahera Island.
    FEAF aircraft fly armed reconnaissance and light raids over northern Borneo, northern Celebes, Flores Island in the Lesser Sunda Islands, and the Wewak, New Guinea area.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 1st Squadron of the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) begins an action to locate and sever the Japanese supply line to the ridge southeast of Limon. In the XXIV Corps area, the 307th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division (reinforced by the 2d Battalion, 306th Infantry Regiment and supported by artillery, Company A of the 776th Amphibious Tank Battalion and Company A of the 88th Chemical Weapons Battalion) drives north astride Highway 2 from Ipil toward Camp Downes, less than 1 mile from Ormoc. A platoon of Company A, 776th Amphibious Tank Battalion, moving by sea, reconnoiters the Camp Downes area, meeting Japanese fire. The 305th Infantry Regiment protects the southern flank of the division, holding the perimeter from Ipil area south to the Baod River. The Americans consolidate their positions in Buri airfield area.
    Over 60 USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Mandurriao, Lahug and La Carlota Airfields on Cebu and Negros Island while fighter-bombers hit the San Isidro area.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: The USAAF Twentieth Air Force's XXI Bomber Command flies Mission 11: 82 B-29s from the Mariana Islands join USAAF Seventh Air Force P-38s, 89 B-24s and Navy cruisers in a strike against airfields on Iwo Jima Island from which Japanese strikes against U.S. airfields in the Mariana Islands are being launched; 61 B-29s bomb the airfields and four bomb other targets without loss.
    The USN bombardment force is Task Group 94.9 (Rear Admiral Allan E. Smith) consisting of the heavy cruisers USS Chester, Pensacola and Salt Lake City and eight destroyers.
    Japanese aircraft strike the Mariana Island airfields on 2, 7, and 27 November, 7 and 25 December (the largest attack-25 aircraft), and from 25 December 1944 to 2 January 1945 in very minor degrees; altogether about 80 Japanese aircraft attack, and nearly 40 are downed. Because of these strikes, 11 B-29s are destroyed and 43 damaged on the ground.

    1945

     
  11. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1932
    CHINA: Japanese forces from Manchukuo invade the Chinese province of Jehol as the Japanese seek to expand their influence in northern China.


    1935
    UNITED KINGDOM: The major powers (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the U.K. and the U.S.) make one last attempt to reduce naval armaments by attending the League of Nations Second London Naval Conference. The French, Italians, and Japanese left the conference without agreeing to any naval reductions, while the treaty which results from the talks remains vague and full of loop holes.

    1940
    JAPAN: Foreign Minister MATSUOKA Yosuke states that war with the United States is not inevitable stating, ". . . if both of us attend to our own business I cannot think there will be any serious clash. . . . We have no difference that cannot be surmounted if we keep our heads cool and mind our business. . . . We do not pass judgment on what the United States does in the West, and we try to confine ourselves to this part of the world."

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the South West Pacific, the 6,030 ton British freighter SS Triaster is sunk by explosive charges by the crew of the German auxiliary cruiser HK Orion.

    1941
    BAKER and HOWLAND ISLANDS: These two islands in the central Pacific are shelled by Japanese submarines HIJMS RO 63, RO 64, and RO 68 in the mistaken belief that American seaplane bases exist there.

    CANADA: Fear of Japanese invasion spreads on the west coast. The Government orders blackouts and closes Japanese-Canadian newspapers and schools.

    CHINA: The Government declares war on Japan, Germany, and Italy.

    GERMANY: Even though Germany and the U.S. are not at war, Chancellor Adolf Hitler orders U-Boats to attack American shipping off the East Coast.

    GILBERT ISLANDS: Japanese troops seize Tarawa and Makin Atolls.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Japanese Naval Aviation Pilot First Class NISHIKAICHI Shigenori, from the aircraft carrier HIJMS Hiryu, who had crash-landed his "Zero" fighter on Niihau Island on 7 December, is placed under guard by the islanders; attempts this day and the next to transport him to Kauai are frustrated by bad weather.

    HONG KONG: Japanese ground forces attack across the frontier of the New Territories and captures the key position of Shing Mun Redoubt. D Company of The Canadian Winnipeg Grenadiers is dispatched to the mainland to strengthen this sector.

    MALAYA: The Japanese force the Indian 9th Division of the Indian III Corps from Kota Bharu Airfield and continue air attacks on other fields, including Kuantan. The RAF abandons Kuantan airfield for Singapore Island and Alor Star airfield, on the northwest coast, for Butterworth. RAF bomber attack on Singora airfield (Thailand) proves very costly since fighter protection is lacking. Dutch planes arrive at Singapore to augment the strength of the RAF.
    Japanese aircraft attack Alor Star airfield. Of the Blenheim Mk Is of RAF No. 62 Squadron based there, only one aircraft survives; its pilot, Flight Lieutenant (USAAF Captain) A S K Scarf single-handedly overcomes strong enemy defences to attack Singora airfield in the north. After recovering to Alor Star, Scarf dies from his wounds, and is posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross five years later when the full facts of his heroism are established.

    MARIANA ISLANDS: Japanese aircraft continue to bomb Guam.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the South China Sea, the British Navy's Force Z under Admiral Tom Phillips is sighted by the north of Singapore by the Japanese. The force consists of the battleship HMS Prince of Wales (53), battlecruiser HMS Repulse (34) and British destroyers HMS Electra (H 27), Express (H 61) and Tenedos (H 04) and Australian destroyer HMAS Vampire (D 68). (Jack McKillop)
    USN Transport USS William Ward Burrows (AP-6), en route to Wake Island, is ordered to return to Honolulu. The ship had departed Honolulu on 29 November towing a barge, PAB-7, and carrying 1,819 tons of cargo. Because of the barge and terrible weather, the ship could only make 5 knots. She crossed the International Date Line on 6 December. On 13 December, she is ordered to Johnston Island and arrives there on 15 December.
    Japanese submarine HIJMS I-10 shells and sinks a 4,473 ton unarmed Panamanian motorship about 872 nautical miles SSE of Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. There are only eight survivors of the 33-man crew; all seven passengers perish.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Continuing the neutralization of U.S. airpower on Luzon, Japanese bombers strike Nichols Field, near Manila.

    THAILAND: The Japanese occupy Bangkok without opposition.

    UNITED STATES: President Franklin D. Roosevelt tells British Prime Minister Winston Churchill that he prefers to meet in Bermuda for security reasons. Churchill convinces Roosevelt to meet with him in Washington. Roosevelt wanted to meet in Bermuda rather than Washington, not for security against the Japanese or Germans, but security from the American press and anti-war advocates.
    German SS Obergruppenfuhrer (U.S. Lieutenant General) Reinhard Heydrich, Protector of Bohemia and Moravia, is bumped from the cover of Time Magazine by late-breaking news of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.
    USAAF fighters at Mitchel Field, Hempstead, Long Island, New York are dispatched to intercept a hostile airplane reported (falsely) to be approaching the East Coast.
    Although having a 3-C draft deferment due to being the sole support of his family, Cleveland Indians pitcher Bob Feller, last years American League leading pitcher with 27 victories, becomes the first major leaguer to enlist after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The 23-year old Navy recruit has already won 107 major league games.

    WAKE ISLAND: Japanese "Nell" bombers based on Roi Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, bomb the island at 1145 hours. One "Nell" is shot down by antiaircraft fire and a second is shot down by two Marine F4F-3s. This is the first Marine aerial victory of World War II


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: The daily weather aircraft cannot return to base due to a sudden snow squall and crash-lands on Atka Island. An attempted bombing mission to Kiska Harbor by three B-26s and six P-38s is forced back by weather.

    NEW GUINEA: The Japanese withdrawal from the Kokoda Trail enables the
    Allies to plan the encirclement of important Japanese positions in the Buna, Sanananda and Gona beachhead. After a preparatory bombardment from air and ground, the Australian 21st Brigade, 7th Division, launches a final assault on Gona area of Papua New Guinea and by 1630 hours overcomes resistance in hand-to-hand combat. Hundreds of Japanese dead are found.
    The 3d Battalion, 127th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, completes an air movement to the Urbana Force front and prepares for the final assault on Buna Village.
    In Papua New Guinea, B-26s bomb the Buna area as ground forces prepare for the final assault on the village. P-40s hit the area along the Sanananda-Soputa trail. In nearby Gona, following air and artillery bombardment, Australian forces overcome resistance, taking the village in hand-to-hand combat.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Army Major General Alexander Patch, Commanding General Americal Division, assumes command of Guadalcanal from Lieutenant General Alexander Vandegrift, USMC. Vandegrift marks the occasion with a letter that pays tribute to the sailors, airmen, soldiers "and small band of devoted allies" that fought side by side with his Marines. The reference quoted is to the Coastwatchers and is so worded for security reasons. The Marines that were expected to make the landing and then hand off the fighting to the Army have been relieved, 124 days after landing.
    The 5th Marine Regiment begins embarking. The 2nd Marine Rgmt, attached to the 1st Marine Division in place of the 7th Marine Rgmt, remains on Guadalcanal with the 2nd Marine Division.
    USAAF B-17s bomb the airfield at Munda, New Georgia Island. No aircraft are lost.
    USN motor torpedo boat PT-59 sinks Japanese submarine HIJMS I-3, engaged in a resupply mission to Guadalcanal, 3 miles NE of Kamimbo Bay.

    UNITED STATES: The U.S. Army is reorganized into three autonomous forces: Army Air Forces, Ground Forces and Services of Supply.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 19 B-24's from Funafuti Atoll in the Ellice bomb Mille Atoll. The B-24's claim 5 fighters destroyed.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): 15 B-25's bomb Wuchang and Hankow, and 3 bomb Changte; P-40's strafe sampans above Nanhsien and attack targets of opportunity in the Salween River area, including road traffic S of Hsia Chai, barracks at Tachai, and the town of San Tsun.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 50 B-25's bomb and strafe the coast of New Britain from Borgen Bay to Rein Bay. In New Guinea, 19 B-25's and A-20's hit barges, coastal installations, and roads in the Fortification Point area; 60+ P-39's hit Bogadjim Road, barges and enemy held villages along the N coast of Huon Peninsula, and enemy positions in the Ramu River valley.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 12 B-25s bomb Lipo, Tuhshan, and Hochih; a B-25 attacks a truck convoy in the Siang-Chiang Valley while a B-24 claims 1 cargo ship sunk in the S China Sea; 19 P-40s and P-51s hit river, road, and rail shipping and other targets of opportunity from Kweiyi to Siangtan; 65 P-51s and P-40s hit similar targets of opportunity around Kweilin, Liuchow, Lingling, Hengyang, Tuhshan, and Chuchou; 50 more fighter-bombers hit targets of opportunity at several other locations scattered throughout S China.

    CHINA: The failure of two Chinese armies (the 5th and 53d) to concentrate for the defense of Kunming endangers the success of the ALPHA plan (the plan to defend Kunming and Chungking) and brings a protest from U.S. Lieutenant General Albert Wedemeyer, Chief of staff to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and Commanding General, U.S. forces in China, to Chiang Kai-shek, who replies that he is keeping the 5th back to defend Kunming.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command area, Japanese forces from Tonk-wa reach Mo-hlaing, where the Chinese 22d Division command post is located. the U.S. 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special), which is arriving in this area, joins the Chinese in a counterattack that restores the positions. The 113th Regiment, Chinese 38th Division, has been unable to penetrate into Bhamo; the 114th Regiment adopts an American suggestion of taking full advantage of supporting artillery and aircraft and is working forward methodically in the northern defenses. South of Bhamo, elements of the Chinese 90th Regiment, 30th Division, becomes isolated during a Japanese counterattack.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 P-47s knock out a bridge at Mongmit, damage another and blast approach to the Namyao bridge; villages and building areas, supply dumps, and targets of opportunity are attacked at Man Mao, Etgyi, Namhsim, Tawma and other points in N Burma. Transports continue flying men and supplies to forward areas, completing nearly 300 sorties.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): During the night of 9/10 Nov, 2 B-24s from Saipan fly harassment strikes against Iwo Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: P-38s hit Old Namlea Airfield on Buru Island. B-25s attack the Wasile Bay area.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb the Lingkas tank farm, Dondang River bridge and Sanga Sanga oil installations on Borneo and three airfields in the Ambon Island-Ceram Island area. P-38s hit Namlea Airfield on Boeroe Island west of Ceram. B-25s attack the Wasile Bay area of Galela Island located 20 miles from Morotai. Ninety one Australian (P-40) Kittyhawks attack Galela Airfield on Galela Island and Miti and Hate Tabako Airfields on Halmahara Island while 14 Beaufighters attack Jolo Island.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: On Leyte, the last of the Japanese reinforcements arrive at Palompon.
    In the U.S. Sixth Army’s X Corps area on Leyte, the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) continues their efforts to dislodge the Japanese from the ridge southeast of Limon and to cut the Japanese supply line. In the XXIV Corps area, convoy arrives with supplies and rest of the 306th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division. The 307th Infantry Regiment continues toward Camp Downes and takes it. The 305th Infantry Regiment secures the region northeast of Camp Downes and protects the northeastern flank of the division. The 2d Battalion of the 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division, joins the 3d Battalion at Mahonag, from which patrols are being sent out. The 1st Battalion, 149th Infantry Regiment, drives north across Buri airstrip but is forced back to the southern edge by Japanese fire. The 1st Battalion, 382d Infantry Regiment, probes to locate the Japanese and contains a night counterattack against its perimeter.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the Australian 9th Battalion, 7th Brigade, 3rd Division, moves forward on Bawabu Ridge toward Pearl Ridge which dominates the area north of Torokina. It becomes evident that the Japanese lines of communications lay along the latter ridge.

    1945
     
  12. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1931
    SWITZERLAND: The Japanese delegate to the League of Nations requests that the League send a special commission to investigate the situation in Manchuria. This request results in the League appointment of the Lytton Commission to review the chain of events that led to the Japanese intervention in northern China.

    1934
    SWITZERLAND: The League of Nations Council appoints a committee to study the question of terrorism, "considering that the rules of international law concerning the repression of terrorist activity are not at present sufficiently precise to guarantee efficiently international cooperation in this matter . . ."


    1941
    HONG KONG: Early in the morning, elements of the Japanese 38th Division attack the Shing Mun Redoubt. The redoubt consists of five pillboxes connected by trenches and underground tunnels designed to be held by a battalion for five weeks; it falls in five hours. The defenders, the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots Regiment, are suffering from malaria and can't hold. British Major General Christopher Maltby, General Officer Commanding Hong Kong, pulls his troops, including two battalions of partially trained Canadians, back to Hong Kong Island.

    MALAYA: As the Japanese continue destructive attacks on airfields in northwestern Malaya, the RAF abandons the airfield at Sungei Patani and withdraws all serviceable aircraft from Butterworth. From Butterworth, an RAF bomber squadron reduced to two aircraft, withdraws to Taiping and No. 21 Squadron, RAAF equipped with (F2A) Buffalo Mk. Is (six repairable aircraft) to Ipoh. The Japanese begin a series of heavy air attacks against Penang Island. The Indian 9th Division withstands attacks while organizing delaying positions south of Kota Bharu. Indian 11th Division columns operating along the Thailand frontier attempt to delay enemy. A Far East Council is formed at Singapore.

    MARIANA ISLANDS: A company of a Japanese Special Naval Landing Force and a Japanese Army detachment lands on Guam and captures the 271 Navy personnel and 122 Marines on the island.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The British Navy's Force Z under Admiral Tom Phillips left Singapore in the evening of 8 December to find the Japanese fleet. The force consists of the battleship HMS Prince of Wales (53), battlecruiser HMS Repulse (34), British destroyers HMS Electra (H 27), Express (H 61) and Tenedos (H 04) and Australian destroyer HMAS Vampire (D 68). The ships are spotted today in the South China Sea by the Japanese submarine HIJMS I-58 just before dawn and attacked by a force consisted of 60 "Nell" bombers (Mitsubishi G3M2 Navy Type 96 Attack Bombers (of the Genzan and Mihoro Kokutais Naval Air Corps) operating with 26 "Betty" bombers (Mitsubishi G4M1 Navy Type 1 Attack Bombers) of the Kanoya Kokutai. All are based in French Indochina. The battleship HMS Prince of Wales is hit by four torpedoes and sinks at 1233 hours local. The battlecruiser HMS Repulse is hit by 14 torpedoes and sinks at 1320 hours local. The death toll from both ships is 840 men (Repulse 513, and the Prince Of Wales, 327). A total of 2,081 men are saved by the four escorting destroyers and taken back to Singapore. The Far Eastern Fleet commander, Admiral Sir Tom Phillips goes down with his ship. In this action, the Japanese lost only four planes. After this disaster, the dominant role of battleships in war comes under grave doubt.
    Four USN destroyers, USS Barker, Bulmer, Parrott and Stewart of Destroyer Division 58, USN Asiatic Fleet, that had been sent to help screen Phillips's ships, having arrived at Singapore too late to sortie with the British force, search unsuccessfully for survivors before returning to Singapore.
    In Memory of Able Seaman STEPHEN SHERIDAN D/MD/X 1995, H.M.S. Prince of Wales., Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, who died age 28 on Wednesday 10 December 1941. Son of Stephen and Hannah Sheridan, of West Derby, Liverpool. Remembered with honour PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL.
    An SBD Dauntless from the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise sinks Japanese submarine HIJMS I-70 about 193 nautical miles NE of Honolulu, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, in position 23.45N, 155.35W. This is one of the submarines used to scout the Hawaiian area in connection with the Pearl Harbor attack and is the first Japanese combatant ship sunk by U.S. aircraft during World War II.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Two Japanese task forces, each consisting of about 2,000 men, arrive off northern Luzon from Formosa. Landings begin simultaneously at Aparri, on the north coast, and near Vigan on the west coast. Far East Air Forces B-17s, P-40s, and Seversky P-35As attack the two convoys landing troops and equipment; a transport at Vigan is destroyed. The strikes include the much publicized attack of Captain Colin P Kelly Jr on a warship off Aparri. Captain Kelly, who is killed when his B-17 is shot down by fighters as he is returning to Clark Field, is later posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for destroying a battleship. However, later information reveals that he attacked the heavy cruiser HIJMS Ashigara, probably scoring near misses.
    Cavite Navy Yard on Luzon is practically obliterated by Japanese "Nell" and "Betty" bombers based on Formosa. Destroyers USS Peary and Pillsbury, submarines USS Seadragon and Sealion, minesweeper USS Bittern, and submarine tender USS Otus , suffer varying degrees of damage from bombs or bomb fragments; ferry launch Santa Rita is destroyed by a direct hit. Submarine rescue vessel USS Pigeon tows Seadragon out of the burning wharf area; minesweeper USS Whippoorwill recovers destroyer USS Peary, enabling both warships to be repaired and returned to service. Minesweeper USS Bittern is gutted by fires. Antiaircraft fire from U.S. guns is ineffective. During the bombing of Manila Bay area, unarmed U.S. freighter SS Sagoland is damaged.
    While flying to safety during the raid on Cavite, Lieutenant Harmon T. Utter's PBY Catalina of Patrol Squadron One Hundred One (VP-101) is attacked by three Japanese "Zero" fighters based on Formosa; Chief Boatswain Earl D. Payne, Utter's bow gunner, shoots down one, thus scoring the U.S. Navy's first verifiable air-to-air "kill" of a Japanese plane in the Pacific War. Utter, as a commander, will later coordinate the carrier air strikes that lead to the destruction of Japanese battleship Yamato on 7 April 1945.

    UNITED STATES. A Treasury agent reports to Army authorities in San Francisco, California, that "an estimated 20,000 Japanese in the San Francisco metropolitan area were ready for organized action." The Army staff immediately began planning for mass evacuation of West Coast Japanese.

    WAKE ISLAND: Twenty six Japanese naval land attack planes from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands bomb Marine installations on Wilkes and Wake islets. During the interception of the bombers, Captain Henry T. Elrod, USMC, executive officer of Marine Fighting Squadron Two Hundred Eleven (VMF-211), shoots down a "Nell" bomber (Mitsubishi G3M2, Navy Type 96 Attack Bomber); this is the first USMC air-to-air "kill" of the Pacific War. Japanese submarines HIJMS RO 65, RO 66, and RO 67 arrive off Wake. Shortly before midnight, submarine USS Triton, patrolling south of the atoll, encounters a Japanese warship, probably a picket for the oncoming assault force.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: The USAAF Eleventh Air Force weather aircraft which crashlanded on Atka Island yesterday is sighted on the west end of the island, its fuselage broken off aft of the wings. The crew, later brought back, is unharmed except for light injuries to Lieutenant General William Lynd, who was observing weather conditions in the Aleutians for General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold, Commanding General, USAAF. General Lynch sustained a cracked collar bone. A PBY lands and rescues the crew.
    An uneventful reconnaissance covers Attu, Kiska and the Semichis Islands.
    Four B26s and six P-38s abort a bomb run to Kiska due to weather.

    AUSTRALIA: SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force) The detachment of the 33d Troop Carrier Squadron, 374th Troop Carrier Group with C-47s operating from Cairns, Queensland, Australia returns to their base at Brisbane, New South Wales preparatory to moving to New Guinea.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Japanese remaining on the coast northwest of Gona, now greatly depleted in strength by air attacks as well as pressure of the Australian 39th Battalion, 21st Brigade, 7th Division, are ordered to establish a defensive perimeter around Napapo and await reinforcements. On the Sanananda front, a Allied supply party reaches the roadblock and finds the garrison in desperate need of relief.
    On the Urbana Force front, the 3d Battalion, 127th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 32d Infantry Division, begins the relief of the 2d Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, which by now is also greatly understrength. The Warren Force continues to bombard and probe the Japanese line in an effort to soften it.
    The Australian 2/6th Independent Company is detached and returns to the Australian 7th Division.
    The Japanese are again supplied by air.
    Australian Brigadier George Wootten, General Officer Commanding 18th Brigade, 7th Division, reports to General Thomas Blarney, Commander-in- Chief of the Australian Military Forces and Commander of Allied Land Forces, Southwest Pacific Area.
    Six Australian (A-20) Bostons bomb Japanese positions at Buna.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Eleven B-17s escorted by eight P-38s of the 339th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group, attack ships in Faisi Harbor; one tanker is hit; six Zekes are claimed destroyed, five by P-38s and one by a B-17.

    UNITED STATES: The War Relocation Authority (WRA) establishes a "Citizens" Isolation Camp" at Moab, Utah, located about 195 miles (314 kilometers) southeast of Salt Lake City, for recalcitrant Japanese-American inmates. This camp, and one at Leupp, Arizona, are designed to hold troublesome individuals from the Japanese Relocation Camps in the western part of the U.S. It was found that in each relocation camp, a small number of men, mostly young Kibei (a person born in the U.S. of Japanese immigrant parents and educated chiefly in Japan) became uncooperative and caused trouble and had to be separated from the general camp population. In June 1943, it is decided to move the prisoners from these two camps to Tule Lake, California, a former relocations camp that had been converted to house the trouble-makers, dissidents and renunciants. After they are moved, the camps at Moab and Leupp are closed.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): 12 B-25's and 15 P-40's attack the marshalling yard at Hanoi, the warehouse area and railroad station suffer heavy damage. Japanese aircraft bomb Hengyang Airfield in China; 8 P-40's intercept 1 wave of airplanes over the field, shooting down 3 of them; 2 P-40's are lost in the combat.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville USAAF Thirteenth Air Force B-25s bomb the Kahili supply area and airfield; P-39s bomb the supply area and antiaircraft positions at Tonolai and strafe four barges in the harbor; New Zealand (PV-1) Venturas hit buildings at Arigua Plantation.
    Marine Fighting Squadron VMF-216 with 17 F4U Corsairs, flies in to operate from Torokina airstrip, which is within 220 miles of Rabaul, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 27 B-24's bomb targets at Cape Gloucester on New Britain and the Huon Peninsula on New Guinea. 40 B-25's and B-26's bomb supply and bivouac areas and bridges along the Bogadjim Road; P-39's strafe barges in the Madang area. HQ 6th Photographic Reconnaissance Group and it's 20th Combat Mapping Squadron transfer from Brisbane, Queensland, Australia to Port Moresby, New Guinea with B-24's and F-7's. HQ 43d Bombardment Group and it's 64th Bombardment Squadron transfer from Port Moresby to Dobodura, New Guinea with B-24's. Force landed is P-40N Piloted by Linder.

    1944
    AUSTRALIA: Vice Admiral Bruce Fraser, Commander-in-Chief British Pacific Fleet (BPF), flies to Sydney, New South Wales, the planned main base for the BPF.
    The British battleship HMS Howe, flagship of the British Pacific Fleet, arrives at Fremantle, Western Australian.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 8 B-25s bomb Kutkai, Burma and hit targets of opportunity in the Liuchow, China area. In China, 25 B-24s bomb the city of Hankow; 3 others bomb Samah Bay docks on Hainan Island; 118 P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance over wide areas of China attack numerous targets of opportunity, concentrating on rail, river, and road traffic, especially in the Hochih, Changsha, and Yuncheng areas.

    CHINA: U.S. Lieutenant General Albert, Chief of staff to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and Commanding General, U.S. forces in China urges, Chiang Kai-shek to order troops of the Yunnan Force (Y-Force) on the Saiween front to take Wanting, at the northeast exit of the Shweli Valley where the Ledo Road is to meet the old Burma Road. The Chinese halted their offensive operations with the fall of Che-fang on 1 December. The Japanese in southern China link up with the Japanese French Indochina Garrison Army, thus opening the route for the movement of two divisions in small groups into French Indochina. This, plus their push into Kweichow, which ended on 3 December, marks a high tide of the Japanese invasion of continent of Asia.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 20 P-47s fly close support strikes in the Bhamo area; 8 others blast approaches to the Hay-ti road bridge; 50+ P-47s hit warehouses and other storage areas, troop concentrations, and positions at Daungbin, Myebalin, Kyaunghkam, Pongon, Thinbaung, Kawnghkang, Pangteng, and Hsipaw; 12 B-25s hit storage areas at Meza, Namun, and Kungmong. Transports fly 178 sorties to forward areas.

    BURMA: Allied engineers complete a 1,154 foot long Bailey bridge, the worlds largest, across the Chindwin River.
    In the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) area, the British 36th Division completes its part of Phase I, Operation CAPITAL (the attack across the Chindwin River to Mandalay), ahead of schedule as patrols enter Indaw and Katha. Later in the month, the division crosses the Irrawaddy River at Katha and drives toward Kyaukme. Japanese forces working toward Bhamo to assist the withdrawal of the garrison penetrate positions of the Chinese 30th Division south of Bhamo; a vigorous counterattack forces the Japanese to go on the defensive. The U.S. 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special), less the 1st Battalion in the Shwegu area, is concentrated in the Mo-hlaing--Tonk-wa area, where it will conduct a holding action while the Chinese 22d Division flies to China.

    FRENCH INDOCHINA: Japanese troops from Operation ICHI-GO link up with compatriots from the French Indochina Garrison Army, gaining control of the vital Indochina to China rail link.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 3 B-24s from Saipan and 1 from Guam fly harassment strikes against Iwo Jima during the night of 10/11 Dec.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s hit the Pamoesian tank farm and nearby alternates of Lingkas tank farm, Labuan Islands docks, and Lutong refinery all in British North Borneo, while in the Netherlands East Indies, B-25s hit Sidate Airfield on Celebes Island and bomb airfields on Boeroe Island west of Ceram Island and Ambon Island.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 32d Infantry Division continues to press southward as does the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) to the east. The 12th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, prepares to attack to reduce a strongpoint in Mt Cabungaan area. In the XXIV Corps area, the 77th Infantry Division, supported by artillery and naval vessels, takes Ormoc. Company A of the 776th Amphibious Tank Battalion moves into the city at 0900 hours, before the infantry assault begins, and starts shelling buildings there. The 307th and 306th Regiments, the former driving along a highway and latter to the east, attack northward and clear the city. The 7th Infantry Division continues forward toward the 77th Infantry Division. The 11th Airborne Division defeats a dispirited counterattack in the Burauen area by a Japanese battalion that has made its way over mountains from Ormoc Bay. The 1st Battalion, 149th Infantry Regiment, 38th Infantry Division, attacks and clears the Buri Airfield area. In a final major effort against the Burauen airfields, beginning at 1930 hours, the Japanese force USAAF Fifth Air Force personnel to fall back, but positions are restored in a counterattack.
    USAAF Far East Air Force P-38s hit Port Misamis on Mindanao Island and fighter- bombers attack storage facilities and targets of opportunity in the central Philippines.
    Off Leyte, USN destroyer USS Hughes is damaged by kamikaze; south of Dulag, a suicide plane crashes the previously damaged freighter SS Marcus Daly, which is discharging cargo to tank landing craft LCT-1075 alongside. LCT-1075 is hit by part of the kamikaze and sunk; SS Marcus Daly suffers no fatalities among the embarked complement (38 merchant sailors, 26-man Armed Guard, 60 stevedores and 124 troops) although eight men are wounded. Nearby freighter SS William S. Ladd is hit by a kamikaze and gutted by fire despite the efforts of four infantry landing craft (LCI) that come alongside; there are no fatalities among the 41-man merchant complement, the 29-man Armed Guard and the 50 stevedores on board to work cargo, although six men are injured. Motor torpedo boat PT-323, damaged by suicide plane is beached and abandoned.

    1944

     
  13. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1931
    JAPAN: Prime Minister WAKATSUKI Reijiro's government falls. This is a revival of a movement for a super-party cabinet. WAKATSUKI's cabinet was fatally compromised by its inveterate liberalism and no longer able to justify itself in a hostile public eye as a buffer between the League of Nations Council and the Japanese high command.


    1941
    AUSTRALIA: Prime Minister John Curtin tells British Prime Minister Winston Churchill that he favors the establishment of "a supreme authority for the higher direction and coordinated control of Allied strategy" in the Far East.

    BURMA: Japanese aircraft bomb Tavoy Airdrome near Rangoon beginning their offensive against the country.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Six Hawaiian Air Force B-18 Bolos fly a sea-search mission. Similar missions by B-17 Flying Fortresses, B-18s, and A-20s are flown each day for the remainder of the year; several submarines are sighted and some are attacked but without positive evidence of hits.

    HONG KONG: Company D of the Winnipeg Grenadiers dispatched to the mainland to strengthen the Gin Drinkers' Line against the Japanese invaders, sees some action, thus becoming the first Canadian Army Unit to fight in World War II. At midday. British Major General Christopher Maltby, General Officer Commanding Hong Kong, orders the mainland troops to withdraw to the island; the Winnipeg Grenadiers cover the Royal Scots' withdrawal down the Kowloon Peninsula.

    INTERNATIONAL: Political actions:
    Germany, Italy and Japan sign a new pact barring a separate peace with the U.S. or the U.K. The pact states:
    - Article I - Italy, Germany and Japan will henceforth conduct in common and jointly a war which has been imposed on them by the United States of America and England, by all means at their disposal and until the end of hostilities.
    - Article II - Italy, Germany and Japan undertake each for himself that none of the parties to the present accord will conclude either armistice or peace, be it with the United States or with England without complete and reciprocal agreement [of the three signatories to this pact].
    - Article III - Italy, Germany and Japan, even after the victorious conclusion of this war, will collaborate closely in the spirit of the Tripartite Pact, concluded Sept. 21, 1940, in order to realize and establish an equitable new order in the world.
    - Article IV - The present accord is effective immediately on its signature and remains in force for the duration of the Tripartite Pact, signed Sept. 21, 1940. The high contracting parties of this accord will at an opportune moment agree among themselves the means of implementing Article III above of this accord. (Jack McKillop)
    Political actions:
    - Both Italy and Germany join Japan in a declaration of war against the US.
    - Hungary breaks diplomatic relations with the U.S..
    - Mexico breaks relations with Germany and Italy.
    - The Netherlands declares war on Italy.
    - Poland declares war on Japan.

    MALAYA: The Indian 9th Division, Indian III Corps, abandons the two remaining airfields in Kelantan (Gong Kedah and Machang) in order to protect communications. The Japanese exert strong pressure against one Indian 11th Division column on the Kroh-Patani road and force the other, on the road to Singora, back toward partially prepared positions at Jitra. The RAF, now greatly depleted in strength, adopts a policy of conducting bomber operations only at night until adequate fighter support is available and of using fighters primarily for defense of the Singapore Naval Base and for protection of convoys bringing reinforcements. Indian III Corps troops are thus denied much close air support.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-9 torpedoes and shells a 5,645 ton, unarmed U.S. freighter about 680 nautical miles NE of Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. The ship sinks tomorrow. One lifeboat is launched and all but four men reach Hawaii on 20 December.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The Japanese Aparri force on Luzon continues rapidly south along Route 5 toward Tuguegarao and Laoag and its airfield fall to the Vigan force. The Japanese begin mining San Bernardino and Surigao Straits while commercial vessels withdraw from Manila Bay.
    By the end of the day, all but one B-17s has been dispatched from Clark Field, Luzon, to Del Monte Field on Mindanao, which is beyond the range of Japanese aircraft.

    UNITED STATES: The U.S. Congress votes to declare war on Germany and Italy. With only one short speech, the Senate voted 88-to-0 for war against Germany, 90-to-0 for war with Italy. There was one abstention, Republican Pacifist Jeannette Rankin called out 'Present' - a refusal to vote. The House of Representatives voted war with Germany, 393-to-0. After the vote is taken the chamber is filled with the noise of stamping feet from the galleries as the public stomped out. It seems that the war with Italy vote (399-to-0) wasn't worth waiting around for. The resolution states, "Therefore, be it Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that the state of war between the United States and the Government of Germany which has thus been thrust upon the United States is hereby formally declared; and the President is hereby authorized and directed to employ the entire naval and military forces of the government to carry on
    war against the Government of Germany; and to bring the conflict to a successful termination, all of the resources of the country are hereby pledged by the Congress of the United States." The Congress also votes to use U.S. forces anywhere in the world. The term of those enlisted under the Selective Service Act is extended for the duration plus six months.
    The U.S. Army's Western Defense Command is established with Lieutenant General John L. DeWitt as commander. One of the units assigned is the 4th Air Force at Hamilton Field, San Rafael, California, which is reassigned from the Air Force Combat Command to the new unit. The West Coast is declared a theater of war.
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) detains 1,370 Japanese Americans classified as "dangerous enemy aliens."
    The Buick Division of the General Motors Corporation lowers its car prices to reflect the absence of spare tires or inner tubes from its new cars. Widespread shortages have led to many quotas and laws designed to conserve America's resources. One of these laws prohibits spare tires on new cars. Rubber, produced overseas, has become almost impossible to get. People did not mind the spare-tire law too much, though. They are too busy dealing with quotas for gasoline, meat, butter, shoes, and other essentials.

    WAKE ISLAND: The USN submarine USS Triton (SS-201), patrolling south of Wake, attacks the Japanese ship she had encountered shortly before midnight; she is unsuccessful.
    The 450 Marines of the Wake Detachment, 1st Defense Battalion, repel an invasion by Japanese troops sinking the destroyer HIJMS Hayate with gunfire while F4F-3 Wildcat pilots sink the destroyer HIJMS Kisaragi with bombs. The Japanese invasion force retires towards the Marshall Islands. Around 0900 hours, 17 Nell bombers of the Chitose Kokutai (Naval Air Corps) based on Roi Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, bomb the naval guns on the island; the Marine pilots shoot down two of the Nells.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: Air Force aircraft fly an uneventful reconnaissance covers Attu, Agattu, Amchitka, Kiska and the Semichis Islands. Three B-26s and four P-38s bomb and strafe a previously bombed cargo vessel in Kiska Harbor, scouting two more direct hits. The P-38s also strafe and bomb the Kiska Harbor submarine base and seaplane hangars, camp area and nearby gun emplacements.

    ANDAMAN ISLANDS: USAAF Tenth Air Force B-24s of the India Air Task Force attack shipping at Port Blair, with negative results.

    NEW GUINEA: Brigadier George Wootten, General Officer Commanding Australian 18th Brigade, 7th Division, inspects the Warren Force front, where positions are virtually static. The first of a number of freighters to bring supplies and personnel to Oro Bay arrives during the night of 11/12 December and unloads four light tanks of the Australian 2/6th Armoured Regiment and supplies.
    In Papua New Guinea, B-26s bomb the airfield and targets of opportunity in the Buna area while B-25s and B-26s attack Lae Airfield.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: USAAF B-17s bomb the Munda Airfield on New Georgia Island with no losses.
    Tonight another "Tokyo Express" run with 11 destroyers is lead by Rear Admiral Tanaka Raizo. One destroyer is sunk by the U.S. PT Boats. Only 300 of the 1200 drums of supplies reach Japanese forces on Guadalcanal.

    1943
    BURMA: In the British Fourteenth Army's IV Corps area, advance elements of the 268th Brigade reach Indaw.

    CEYLON: Admiral Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander, South East Asia Command, issues a directive ordering the integration of the USAAF Tenth Air Force and RAF Bengal Command into the Eastern Air Command (EAC). All Allied air forces in southeast Asia are under command of Air Chief Marshal (USAAF General) Sir Richard Peirse as Allied Air Commander-in-Chief.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 14 B-25's and 10 P-40's attack Shihshow and Ansiang; 3 B-24's bomb Hankow airfield; 9 P-40's intercept about 30 Japanese airplanes over Nanchang shortly after the enemy force bombs Suichwan; the P-40's claim 10 aircraft shot down.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomon , 16 B-25's, in 2 waves, attack Kahili; several other B-25's hit Arigua Plantation; 20+ B-24's bomb the village and wharf area at Tsirogei; 8 P-39's bomb Tonolai; several aircraft on armed reconnaissance, operating individually or in small flights, attack targets of opportunity scattered throughout Bougainville and the Shortland area; Allied night fighters carry out a strike on a Japanese bivouac along the Jaba River; others hit Buka and Bonis. A detachment of the 17th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, 4th Photographic Group (Reconnaissance), based on Guadalcanal in the Solomon, begins operating from Bougainville with F-5's.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): B-25's bomb and strafe the Borgen Bay area. B-25's and B-26's hit bivouacs and other installations near Fortification Point and in the Finschhafen area. The 65th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 43d BG (Heavy), transfers from Port Moresby to Dobodura, New Guinea with B-24's. The 80th Fighter Squadron, 8th FG, transfers from Port Moresby to Dobodura, New Guinea with P-38's.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Fifth Air Force B- 24s bomb Makassar on Celebes Island and Balikpapan, Borneo.

    1944

    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 4 B-25s fly a negative enemy shipping search.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: USN Task Force 38 (TF 38 ) sails from Ulithi Atoll to participate in the invasions of Mindoro and Luzon Islands, Philippine Islands. TF 38 consists of six aircraft carriers (CVs) and six small aircraft carriers (CVLs) with six carrier air groups (CVGs), five light carrier air groups (CVLGs) and one night light carrier air group [CVLG(N)] .
    - Task Group (TG) 38.1: USS Cowpens (CVL-25) with CVLG-22, USS Monterey
    (CVL-26) with CVLG-28 ), USS Wasp (CV-18 ) with CVG-81 and USS Yorktown (CV-10)
    with CVG-3.
    - TG 38.2: USS Cabot (CVL-28 ) with CVLG-29, USS Hancock (CV-19) with CVG-11,
    USS Independence (CVL-22) with CVLG(N)-41 and USS Lexington (CV-16) with
    CVG-20
    - TG 38.3: USS Essex (CV-9) with CVG-4, USS Langley (CVL-27) with CVLG-44),
    USS San Jacinto (CV-30) with CVLG-45) and USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) with
    CVG-80).

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-24s and 6 B-25s, supported by 8 P-51s, pound the Hai Duong, French Indochina area. 12 B-25s bomb Kutkai, Burma. 16 fighter-bombers attack Tien Ho Airfield at Canton and the Kengtung barracks in China; and Lashio, and Wan Lai-Kam, Burma.

    CHINA: U.S. Lieutenant General Albert Wedemeyer, Commanding General U.S. China Theater of Operations and Chief of Staff to Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, Chairman of the National Government, drafts directives for Operation ALPHA (the plan to defend Kunming and Chungking) that Chiang Kai-shek later approves. Chinese General Ying-chin Ho, Commander-in-Chief Chinese Army General Headquarters, is to command ALPHA forces, but U.S. Major General Claire Chennault, Commanding General USAAF Fourteenth Air Force, will command air forces in the area. ALPHA forces are to complete concentration in the Kweiyang area, protect Kunming and Kweiyang, and train reserves.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 B-25s hit the stores area at Hpaklon; 16 P-47s support ground forces in the Bhamo area; 21 P-47s knock out and damage bridges at Mongmit, Man Aitau, Ho-hko, and Pa-mao; 7 fighter-bombers severely damage the Hsipaw ferry; supply and personnel concentrations and town areas are hit at Lawa, Myitson, Pemnegon, Nam Pan, Hsenwi, and Nawngpeng. 270 transport sorties are flown to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): Colonel Lawrence J Carr becomes Commanding Officer of the VII Bomber Command. On Iwo Jima, 28 B-24s from Guam pound the airfield and ammunition storage area; night harassment continues as individual B-24s from Guam and Saipan fly 3 snooper strikes against the island during the night of 11/12 Dec.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces (FEAF) B-25s, A-20s, and fighter-bombers attack Japanese supply and troop concentrations on the southern shore of Wasile Bay on Galela Island off Morotai and along the shores of north Halmahera, sinking a freighter. Other FEAF planes make small raids on oil and shipping targets around northern Borneo.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the Bohol Sea, Japanese planes attack a resupply convoy of 13 USN medium landing ships (LSMs) and landing craft, infantry (LCIs), bound for Ormoc Bay, Leyte, Philippine Islands; escorting destroyer USS Reid shoots down seven aircraft but is sunk by two kamikazes off the southern coast of Leyte about 75 nautical miles SSE of Ormoc in position 09.50N, 124.55E; 52 of her crew are lost.
    In the Visayan Sea, USMC F4U Corsairs repeat a mast-head attack on a Japanese convoy about 31 nautical miles NW of Ormoc, Leyte, in position 11.20N, 124.10E.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, 1st Squadron, 12th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, reduces the strongpoint north of its perimeter in the Mt. Cabungaan area after intense preparatory fire. Patrols of the 2d Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), probe both sides of the ridge southeast of Limon before the general frontal and flanking attack is begun behind artillery bombardment; the advance stops for the night at the base of the hill. The 128th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, begins patrolling the Limon area. The XXIV Corps gains firm control of Ormoc Bay as advance elements of the 7th Infantry Division overtake the 77th Infantry Division troops at Ipil. Japanese forces on Leyte are thus divided.
    The 77th Infantry Division attacks from Ormoc with the 307th and 306th Infantry Regiments but makes little progress. Japanese attempts to land reinforcements at Ormoc Bay, during the night of 11/12 December, are frustrated. A few Japanese succeed in landing but are unable to take an active part in the battle for the Ormoc corridor.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Mandurriao Airfield on Cebu Island. B-25s, with P-47 support, hit Padada Aerodrome on Mindanao Island and Fifth Air Force fighters join U.S. Marine Corps aircraft in attacks on a 13-ship convoy off northwestern Leyte Island. Leyte-based planes begin missions in support of the coming invasion of Mindoro. USN submarine USS Gar lands supplies on the west coast of Luzon, and picks up intelligence documents.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, the Australian 11th Brigade, 3rd Division, relieves the U.S. 148th Infantry Regiment, 37th Infantry Division.

    UNITED STATES: The remains of a paper Japanese Fu Go paper balloon including envelope, rigging and some apparatus, is recovered at Kalispell, Montana. It is believed that the balloon landed between 11 and 25 November. Kalispell is located about 150 miles NW of Great Falls.

    1945

     
  14. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1932
    CHINA: The Government reestablishes diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union.

    1935
    CHINA: Two Chinese provinces bordering Manchukuo, Chahar and Hopei, are declared to be autonomous by the Japanese.


    1936
    CHINA: Zhang Xueliang and General Yang Hucheng kidnap General Chiang Kai-shek in Xi'an (Sian) in an effort to force Chiang to declare war against the Japanese. There are demonstrations of support for Chiang across China, including the Communist Chinese. These demonstrations force Chang to release Chiang and Chiang's support reflects a great deal of unity among the Chinese people. Hucheng is imprisoned by Chiang and spends decades under house arrest until Chiang Kai-shek dies in the 1970s.

    1937
    CHINA: Yesterday, the USN river gunboat USS Panay (PR-5) departed Nanking with the remaining members of the U.S. Embassy staff. As the Japanese are attacking the city, the majority of the staff had left on 22 November. Also embarked on Panay are a number of civilians. The ship starts upriver, escorting three Standard Oil barges. Two British river gunboats, HMS Ladybird and HMS Bee and a few other British craft follow the same course. For 2 miles this little flotilla is fired upon repeatedly by a shore battery commanded by Colonel HASHIMOTO; his object is to provoke the U.S. into a declaration of war, which will eliminate civilian influence from the Japanese government and complete the "Showa Restoration." (The Showa Restoration was a combination of Japanese nationalism, Japanese expansionism, and Japanese militarism all carried out in the name of the Showa Emperor, Hirohito.) The shooting is so wild that Panay and her convoy, making slow speed against the current, pull out of range without suffering a hit. An advanced Army unit notifies naval authorities that Chinese troops are fleeing the capital in ten ships.
    At 1100 today, USS Panay and the three tankers anchor near Hoshien, upstream from Nanking. American flags are hoisted on their masts and painted on the awnings and topsides. The day is clear, sunny and still. Panay's crew eat their Sunday dinner and secure. No guns are manned or even uncovered. Shortly after 1330 hour, three Japanese Navy aircraft fly overhead and release 18 bombs, one of which disables Panay's forward 3-inch gun, wrecked the pilothouse, sick bay and fire room and wound the captain and several others. Immediately after, 12 more planes dive-bomb and nine fighters strafe, making several runs over a space of 20 minutes. Panay's crew fight back with 30-caliber machine guns.
    By 1406 hours all power and propulsion are lost, the main deck is awash and, as the captain sees that his ship is sinking, he orders her to be abandoned. Japanese planes strafe the boats on their way to shore, and even comb the reeds along the riverbank for survivors. Two of the three oil barges are also bombed and destroyed. The Panay survivors, kindly treated by the Chinese, manage to get word through to Admiral Harry Yarnell, Commander-in-Chief Asiatic Fleet, and are taken on board U.S.S. Oahu (PR-6) and HMS Ladybird two days later. Two sailors and a civilian passenger die of their wounds; eleven officers and men were seriously wounded. The Japanese maintain that the attack was unintentional, and they agree to pay US$2 million (US$26.3 million in 2004 dollars) in reparations.


    1940
    UNITED STATES: In a report drawn up by U.S. Army officers, they report that all is not well with the draft (conscription) and the equipment of the conscripts. The Army lacks not only arms and ammunition for such a force, but housing facilities and all items of equipment down to shoe strings. It lacks uniforms, shoes and other items of clothing. Strikes are holding up the progress of the defence program

    1941
    BURMA: The Japanese begin small-scale operations, using infiltration tactics. From Thailand, a small force crosses into lower Tenasserim unopposed. British General Sir Archibald P. Wavell, Commander-in-Chief India, is given responsibility for Burma, previously within Air Chief Marshal Sir Robert Brooke-Popham's Far Eastern Command, and is promised reinforcements to strengthen the small garrison, fighting strength of which does not exceed 30 battalions during the campaign. Lieutenant General D. K. MacLeod's Burma Army, charged with protecting the Burma Road and Tenasserim airfields, is a heterogeneous group of Burmese, Indian, and British forces, some poorly trained, formed into the Burma 1st Division (Burma 1st and 2d Brigades and Indian 13th Brigade) and Indian 16th Brigade. The 16 obsolete RAF fighters on hand are augmented by a squadron of the American Volunteer Group (AVG) fighters, which is flown in to Mingaladon from the AVG base in China. Air strength is eventually increased but not enough to alter ground operations materially.

    EAST INDIES: The bulk of the Australian "Sparrow Force" arrives at Koepang, Dutch Timor. This Force is the garrison given the code-name Sparrow Force that is to defend the island and protect the airfield at Penfui. The troops begin to take up defensive positions around Koepang, the capital of west Timor, and the aerodrome at Penfui. This component of the Force comprises the Tasmanian 2/40th Battalion Australian Imperial Force (AIF) supported by artillery, signals, medical and headquarters troops. Sparrow Force's anti aircraft capability is provided by a British unit, 79th Anti Aircraft Battery Royal Army, veterans of the Battle of Britain. They are joined by one of Australia's new Independent Companies, the largely Western Australian, No.2 or the 2/2nd Independent Company. The Australian elements of Sparrow Force total 70 officers and 1330 men. The existing Netherlands East Indies garrison numbers about 500. At Penfui RAAF Hudson medium bombers from No. 2 Squadron begin flyin
    g anti shipping sorties.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Japanese Naval Aviation Pilot First Class NISHIKAICHI Shigenori begins, with the aid of HARADA Yoshio, a Japanese resident of Niihau Island, to terrorize the inhabitants of the island into returning papers confiscated on 7 December. In response to this campaign of intimidation, the islanders flee to the hills.

    HONG KONG: British troops evacuate Kowloon in any vessel that can sail to Hong Kong Island. The Royal Engineers destroy anything useful on the north side.

    INTERNATIONAL: Declarations of war:
    - Bulgaria, Hungary and Slovakia declare war on the U.K. and U.S.
    - Croatia and Romania declare war on the U.S.
    - Haiti, El Salvador and Panama declare war on Germany and Italy

    MALAYA: British Lieutenant General Arthur Percival, General Officer Commanding Malaya Command, decides to withdraw the Indian III Corps from Kelantan since the airfields there are already in possession of the Japanese; movement of surplus supplies to rear is begun. Troops fight delaying actions while awaiting rolling stock in which to withdraw. The Japanese penetrate the Jitra position and force the Indian 11th Division task force back to the Kedah River. The Indian 11th Division force, called the Krohcol force, on the Kroh-Patani road, also falls back under pressure and at midnight 12/13 December, passes to the direct command of corps. The Indian 12th Brigade Group is released from reserve for action on the west coast.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The unarmed 6,210 ton U.S. freighter SS Vincent en route from Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, to Panama, is shelled and sunk by Japanese armed merchant cruisers Aikoku Maru and Hokoku Maru about 555 nautical miles WNW of Easter Island in position 22.41S, 118.19W. All 36 crewmen are captured by the Japanese; two die in captivity.
    In the Sulu Sea, USN submarine USS S-38 mistakenly torpedoes and sinks Norwegian merchantman SS Hydra II west of Cape Calavite, Mindoro, Philippine Islands, believing her to be a Japanese auxiliary. SS Hydra II had been en route from Bangkok, Thailand, to Hong Kong, when she is diverted to Manila by the outbreak of war.
    In the South China Sea, Dutch submarines operate off Malaya against Japanese invasion shipping. HNMS K XII torpedoes and sinks a Japanese army cargo ship about 1.4 nautical miles NE of Kota Bharu, in position 06.08N, 102.16E.; meanwhile, HNMS O 16 torpedoes and damages three Japanese army cargo ships off Patani/Singora, Thailand.
    The USN heavy cruiser USS Pensacola departed Pearl Harbor 29 November 1941 with a convoy bound for Manila in the Philippines. Today, the U.S. troops aboard the troop transports are organized as Task Force South Pacific and placed under command of Brigadier General Julian F. Barnes. The convoy is ordered to proceed to Australian.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The Japanese make another preliminary landing, at Legaspi, southern Luzon. The task force of 2,500 men from Palau Islands, Caroline Islands, goes ashore unopposed and secures Legaspi and the airfield. Major General George M. Parker, Jr., whose South Luzon Force consists of 41st and 51st Divisions (Philippine Army), sends elements of the 51st forward to delay the Japanese, but contact is not made for several days. Tuguegarao Airfield falls to the Aparri force early in morning. Japanese planes attack Luzon in force.
    Over 100 Japanese aircraft hit targets at Clark Field, Batangas, and Olongapo on Luzon Island. The single Far East Air Force B-17 Flying Fortress that is sent against Japanese transports at Vigan damages a transport.
    Captain Jesus A. Villamor led the open-cockpit monoplane P-26A Peashooter fighterss of the 6th Pursuit Squadron Philippine Air Force, the only ones of their type to see action in World War II. Villamor shoots down a Japanese "Nell" bomber (Mitsubishi G3M2, Navy Type 96 Attack Bomber) of the First Kokutai (Naval Air Corps) based at Tainan, Formosa, over Batangas.

    UNITED STATES: The Naval Air Transport Service (NATS) is established under the Chief of Naval Operations to provide rapid air delivery of critical equipment, spare parts, and specialist personnel to naval activities and fleet forces all over the world.

    WAKE ISLAND: Two Japanese "Mavis" reconnaissance flying boats of the Yokohama Kokutai (Naval Air Corps) based in the Marshall Islands bomb the island in a pre-dawn raid. One is shot down by a Marine F4F Wildcat pilot.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: An attempted photographic reconnaissance mission over Kiska Island by a B-24 and two P-38s returns without result due to weather. Another reconnaissance B-24 is turned back by a weather front west of Buldir Island.
    The detachment of the 42d Fighter Squadron, 54th FG, which has been operating in Alaska with P-39s since Jun 42, returns to its base at Harding Field, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    NEW GUINEA: From Oro Bay, Papua New Guinea, tanks are moved forward by sea to Hariko and hidden. Corvettes with Australian forces embarked (18th Brigade Headquarters, 2/9th Battalion, and Officer Commanding 2/10th Battalion) arrive off Soena Plantation after nightfall; they withdraw to Porlock Harbor after a few troops are unloaded because of the news that Japanese naval force is moving on Buna. Around midnight, the Japanese begin landing at the mouth of the Mambare River, near Cape Ward Hunt.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF A-20s strafe barges off Sanananda Point while B-17s bomb the airfields at Lae and Salamaua.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the 2d Marine Division begins the relief of the Army's Americal Division west of the Matanikau River. A Japanese party raids Fighter Strip 2 under cover of darkness. The 2d Marine Division Signal Company and the 18th Naval Construction Battalion arrive.
    B-17s begin a series of daily attacks on the Japanese airfields nearing completion at Munda, New Georgia Island. Nine SBDs join the attack which is the first by the USMC.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 25 B-24's flying out of Ellice bases, bomb Emidj in the Marshall .

    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 28 B-25's and 13 B-24's carry out a saturation bombing strike against bridge at Myittha, over which a large volume of Japanese goods is flowing to the N. Despite this large air effort only the approach spans suffer effective damage.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 41 Japanese bombers and fighters bomb the W side of Hengyang Airfield, causing considerable damage; 31 P-40's and 6 P-38's intercept the enemy force, claiming 20 airplanes shot down; 2 P-40's are lost. 9 B-24's bomb Hankow airfield.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 6 B-25's strafe Arigua Plantation; 9 others, with fighter support, bomb the supply area at Bonis; the fighters afterwards strafe Japanese forces between Kieta and the Aropa River; other fighter aircraft strafe Tonolai Harbor and cover USN dive bomber strikes against targets in the Ratsua-Porton-Chabai-Soraken areas and the Kieta Harbor-Tobera Bay area; and 20+ B-24's bomb the Kahili area and Poporang.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): P-40's dive-bomb Bogadjim Road. EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies (NEI), USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s make light raids on Ceram Island and in the far western part of the NEI.

    NEW HEBRIDES ISLANDS: From the diary of Glen Boren, US Sailor aboard the aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill. Arrived in the morning with our planes flying off for the field. We got to Lugan Field (on Espirito Santo) about 1230, had lunch and headed for the strip for A/C maintenance. Lots of hole patching, fixing oil leaks in the rocker box covers to stop oil from streaking the windshields, etc.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): The weather aircraft aborts the mission due to the weather.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-25s bomb Kutkai, Burma, damaging 3 warehouses and 2 other buildings. 50+ P-40s, P-51s, and P-38s on armed reconnaissance attack many targets of opportunity including town areas, road and rail traffic, and supplies at or near Wan Pa-Hsa, Burma, Chiengmai, Thailand, and Sinantien, Paoching, Hengyang, Changsha, Kweilin, Nan Tan, Hochih, and Szeenhsien, China. Several fighter-bombers drop napalm on Yangtong Airfield, China. The 2d Combat Cargo Squadron, 1st Combat Cargo Group, moves from Imphal, India to Tsuyung, China.

    BURMA: In the Allied Land Forces South East Asia (ALFSEA) area, the British XV Corps begins an offensive (Operation ROMULUS) to clear the Arakan coastal sector and gain air and naval bases from which to support future operations.

    While the Indian 25th Division pushes southward along the Mayu Peninsula toward Akyab, the West African 82d Division begins clearing the Kalapanzin Valley in the Buthidaung area and the West African 81st Division attacks in the Kaladan Valley in the vicinity of Kyauktaw.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 11 B-25s bomb several storage areas N of Lashio; 20+ P-47s knock out bridges at Namyao and Inailong, Burma, and Kunlong, China, and damage others at Ho-hko, Burma and
    Hinlong, and Kunlong, China; 40+ fighter-bombers hit Japanese HQ, trucks, town areas, troop concentrations, and supplies at Sedo, Pale, Chaunggyi, Tada-u, Hsenwi, Shwebo, and Thabyetha. 263 transport sorties are flown to forward areas. The 166th Liaison Squadron (Commando), 1st Air Commando Group, moves from Yazagyo to Inbaung, Burma with UC-64s and L-5s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 24 Saipan based B-24s pound Iwo Jima. Individual B-24s from Saipan and Guam fly 5 snooper strikes against Iwo Jima during the night of 12/13 Dec.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): The service groups of the 313th Bombardment Wing (Very Heavy) arrive on Tinian.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: HQ 4th Photographic Group (Reconnaissance) moves from Guadalcanal to Morotai Island. The 460th Fighter Squadron, 348th FG, moves from Tacloban to Tanauan with P-47s.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Kendari Airfield on Celebes Island. In the Ambon-Ceram-Boeroe Islands area, B-25s hit three airfields and attack barges.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, USAAF Far East Air Forces A-20s hit the airfield on Jefman Island a small island off the coast.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 32d Infantry Division straightens their lines south of Limon and during the night of 12/13 December and shells Japanese positions ahead of it on Highway 2 as far south as Lonoy. XXIV Corps chases off a Japanese vessel sighted near Linao at dawn. The 77th Infantry Division consolidates positions just north of Ormoc while amassing supplies and artillery.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s, with fighter cover, bomb Bacolod Airstrip on Negros Island while B-25s hit San Roque Airfield on Mindanao Island.
    General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific Area, presents Major Richard I. Bong with the Medal of Honor he was awarded "for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action above and beyond the call of duty in the Southwest Pacific area from 10 October to 15 November 1944" at Tacloban Field, Leyte.

    1945

     
  15. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1921
    INTERNATIONAL: France, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States sign the Four Power Treaty, pledging to consult one another if any of their Pacific island possessions is threatened.

    1932
    JAPAN: A new, more militant, cabinet headed by Prime Minister INUKAI Tsuyoshi is installed. It immediately approves additional funding for the war effort in China. INUKAI is assassinated by young naval officers in Tokyo on 15 May 1932. This assassination is a key event in Japanese history, known as the go ichi go jiken (May 15 incident). It marks the end of party political control over government decisions until after World War II.


    1937
    CHINA: THE RAPE OF NANKING: Nanking, the Chinese capital, has a population of just over one million, including over 100,000 refugees. Today, the city falls to the invading Japanese troops. For the next six weeks the soldiers indulge in an orgy of indiscriminate killing, rape and looting. They shoot at everyone on sight, whether out on the streets or peeking out of windows. The streets are soon littered with corpses, on one street a survivor counts 500 bodies. Girls as young as twelve, and women of all ages are gang raped by 15 to 20 soldiers, crazed by alcohol, who roam the town in search of women. At the Jingling Women's University, students are carted away in trucks to work in Japanese army brothels. Over 1,000 men are rounded up and marched to the banks of the Yangtze River where they are machine-gunned to death. Thousands of captured Chinese soldiers are similarly murdered. In the following six weeks, the Nanking Red Cross units alone, bury around 43,000 bodies. About 20,000 women and girls have been raped, most are then murdered. Department stores, shops, churches and houses are set on fire while drunken soldiers indulge in wholesale looting and bayoneting of Chinese civilians for sport. It is estimated that up to 150,000 Chinese civilians and soldiers are killed in this, the most infamous atrocity committed by the Japanese army. In charge of the troops during this time was General MATSUI Iwane, Commander in Chief Central China Area Army. As word of the "Rape of Nanking" leaks out, MATSUI is recalled to Japan in 1938 and he retires. He is indicted and tried at the Tokyo War Crimes Trial. MATSUI is found guilty of a war crime unrelated to Nanking and sentenced to death. He is hanged in 1948. After the war, China tries about 800 persons for war crimes including those responsible for the Nanking and Shanghai massacres. The death penalty is given to 149 defendants.

    1941
    AUSTRALIA: Prime Minister John Curtin sends a message to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt welcoming the opportunity of co-operating with the U.S., and offering the use of Australian facilities. He also seeks U.S. help in securing the French territory of New Caledonia in the southwest Pacific east of Queensland.

    BORNEO: A small Miri detachment (Indian company and engineers), having destroyed the oil fields and installations in British East Sarawak and West Brunei to deny them to the Japanese, sails for Kuching, capital of Sarawak, where the rest of the Indian battalion, with local and administrative attachments, is disposed to defend the airdrome. Dutch planes based on Singkawang assist RAF units on Malaya in searching for Japanese shipping heading southward from Indochina.

    BURMA: The British have to evacuate their airfield at Victoria Point and the Japanese follow and move in. This airfield is in the far south of the Burma on the Kra Isthmus.

    COSTA RICA: USN gunboat USS Erie (PG-50) receives 50 Japanese POWs at Puntarenas, Costa Rica, from Costa Rican government, and sends a prize crew to take charge of the motor vessel MV Albert.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: The occupation of Niihau Island by Japanese Naval Aviation Pilot First Class NISHIKAICHI Shigenori ends: a party of Hawaiians sets out for Kauai to inform the outside world of events on Niihau; in the meantime, NISHIKAICHI burns his plane (it will not be until July 1942 that the U.S. Navy will be able to obtain an intact "Zeke" fighter to study) and the house in which he believes his confiscated papers are hidden. Later, in confrontation with a local Hawaiian, Benny Kanahele, a scuffle to grab the pilot's pistol ensues. Although Kanahele is shot three times, he picks up Nishikaichi bodily and dashes the pilot's head into a stone wall, killing him; HARADA Yoshio, the Japanese resident of Niihau who had allied himself with the pilot, commits suicide. Kanahele survives his injuries. On the basis of the report by the islanders who have arrived on Kauai after a 15-hour trip, meanwhile, Commander, Kauai Military District (Colonel Edward W. FitzGerald, USA) dispatches expedition (squad of soldiers from Company M, 299th Infantry Regiment) in the unarmed U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender USCGC Kukui to proceed from Kauai to Niihau.

    HONG KONG: Japanese troops reach the Kowloon waterfront across the harbor from Hong Kong Island. The British Governor rejects a Japanese demand for the surrender of Hong Kong. The defense of the island is organized into a West Brigade, commanded by Canadian Brigadier J.K. Lawson, and including The Winnipeg Grenadiers; and an East Brigade, under British Brigadier C. Wallis, including The Royal Rifles of Canada. British Major General Christopher Maltby, General Officer Commanding Hong Kong, deploys both Canadian units to defend the southern beaches against a seaborne attack, as heavy Japanese artillery fire and air raids begin.

    INTERNATIONAL: Declarations of war:
    - The U.K., New Zealand and the Union of South Africa declare war on Bulgaria.
    - Honduras declares war on Germany and Italy.
    - Italy declares war on Cuba and Guatemala.

    MALAYA: Japanese troops march into Alor Star, and take a number of Indian troops prisoner. Among the POWs is Major Mohan Singh, who agrees to set up a special unit for Indians, Burmese and Thais to fight against the British. The slogan for the unit is "Asia for the Asiatics."
    The British mobile column "Krohcol" concentrates in positions 2 to 3 miles west of Kroh. The Indian 11th Division begins withdrawing from the Kedah River toward Gurun, a more favorable defense position in southern Kedah some 30 miles south of Jitra. Fighter support is increased as No. 453 Squadron RAAF with 13 Buffalo Mk. Is from Singapore joins the few fighters based at Ipoh. Reports of a Japanese convoy moving south-southwest from Saigon, French Indochina, result in a period of sharply increased British air reconnaissance from Malaya.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Japanese aircraft again attack Luzon, virtually completing the destruction of Far East Air Force and USN aircraft in the Philippines. Del Carmen, Clark and Nichols Fields are hit, as well as Baguio, Tarlac, Cabanatuan and Batangas.
    First Lieutenant Boyd D Wagner of the 17th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor), 24th Pursuit Group (Interceptor), shoots down four Japanese airplanes near Aparri while on a reconnaissance mission over northern Luzon. In another action, Captain Jesus Villamor of the Philippine Air Force leads six P-26 Peashooters in an interception of 54 Japanese bombers attacking Batangas Field, Luzon; their harassing tactics minimized the damage to the field.

    UNITED STATES: So far, the U.S. Department of Justice has rounded up 831 enemy aliens in on the West coast, including 585 Japanese and 187 Germans.
    Congress, to meet the demand for trained enlisted men, authorizes the retention of enlisted men in the Navy upon the expiration of their enlistments when not voluntarily extended.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A largely negative reconnaissance is flown over Attu, Agattu, Kiska, Amchitka and the Semichis Islands by two B-24s and two P-38s.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-26s hit Gasmata Airfield on New Britain Island.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, further futile efforts are made to supply the roadblock on the Soputa-Sanananda trail, which is now out of contact with the rest of front. Buna Village is subjected to heavy fire in preparation for an attack on 14 December; after nightfall, the Japanese garrison, now reduced to about 100 men, evacuates the village and swims for Giruwa. Corvettes return to Oro Bay under cover of darkness and finish unloading Australian troops.
    In Papua New Guinea, a Japanese convoy of five destroyers, bringing some 800 men (among them Major General ODA Kensaku, General Horii's successor as commander of South Seas Detachment), is detected off Madang while proceeding toward the beachhead and unsuccessfully attacked by Allied planes. USAAF Fifth Air Force B-17s and B-24s attack as it moves south but fail to deter its progress.
    Meanwhile A-20s bomb and strafe the Cape Killerton area while B-17s bomb the Salamaua area.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, the Army's 3d Battalion, 182d Infantry Regiment and Company C of the 2d Marine Engineer Battalion arrive.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 10 B-24's, staging through Baker from Canton in the Phoenix , bomb Wotje Atoll in the Marshalls.

    BURMA-INDIA (Tenth Air Force): In India, 20 Japanese bombers, escorted by 25 fighters, hit Dinjan Airfield before US interceptors make contact; however, little damage is done and the US fighters catch the attackers shortly afterward; 12 Japanese bombers and 5 fighters are claimed shot down. The 436th Bombardment Squadron, 7th BG (Heavy), transfers from Panagarh to Madhaiganj, India with B-24's.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 12 B-25's, with fighter escort, bomb Li-Chou and Kungan; 8 B-25's pound Wuchang Airfield; and 16 P-40's on armed reconnaissance strafe targets of opportunity from Changte to Linli to Li-Chou.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 17 B-25's bomb Porton, and their fighter escorts strafe Tenekow bivouac areas during the return flight; 24 B-24's bomb Bonis; 6 B-25's carry out low-level strikes against concentrations on Numa Numa. The 72d Bombardment Squadron, 5th BG (Heavy), based on Espiritu Santo in the New Hebrides with B-24's, begins operating from Guadalcanal in the Solomon.

    D'ENTRECASTEAUX ISLANDS: Task Force DIRECTOR (USN Task Force 76) sails from Goodenough Island for Buna, Papua New Guinea, en route to Arawe, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): 100+ B-24's and B-25's and several P-40's bomb Gasmata. A-20's hit villages along Bogadjim Road; a small flight of P-39's strafe barges along the Huon Peninsula. The 340th Fighter Squadron, 348th Fighter Group, transfers from Port Moresby to Finschhafen with P-47's. The 403d Bombardment Squadron, 43d BG (Heavy), transfers from Port Moresby to Dobodura, New Guinea with B-24's.

    1944
    ALASKA (Eleventh Air Force): 4 B-25s weather abort a shipping search.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-25s severely damage the warehouse area at Hsenwi, Burma. 2 bomb the town of Wuming, China. 24 P-51s and P-38s hit the town of Bac Ninh and the rail yards at Phu Lang Thuong, French Indochina, and damage a bridge at Chiengmai, Thailand. HQ 341st Bombardment Group (Medium) moves from Kunming to Yangkai, China.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command, the 114th Regiment, Chinese 38th Division, breaks through the northern defenses of Bhamo and is pushing into the central part. In the Tonk-wa area, the U.S. 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special) quickly repels a Japanese attack.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 B-25s bomb the storage and personnel area at Mongmit; 7 P-47s damage the approach to the Hay-ti road bridge while 4 support US infantry forces near Tonkwa; supply areas, personnel, Japanese-held buildings, vehicles, and general targets of opportunity are hit by 60+ fighter-bombers at several places including Hosi, Longkin, Kyauktaing, Tigyaing, Kantha, Man Pwe, and Konnyaung. 260+ transport sorties carry men and supplies to forward areas.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): With most of its personnel aboard the SS Sea Flasher and its equipment aboard the SS Cape Catoche, HQ Seventh AF arrives at Tanapag from Hawaii; the remainder of HQ arrives by air, 14-19 Dec. 15 Guam based B-24s bomb Iwo Jima; 3 from Saipan, on an armed reconnaissance mission, bomb Marcus. During the night of 13/14 Dec, 6 B-24s make individual harassment raids against Iwo Jima from Saipan and Guam.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 12: 90 B-29s from the Mariana Islands are dispatched to attack the Mitsubishi aircraft engine plant at Nagoya, Japan; 71 hit the primary target causing considerable damage as bombing accuracy is improved; 9 others hit alternate targets; they claim 4-1-0 Japanese aircraft; 4 B-29s are lost.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The 2d Photographic Charting Squadron, 311th Photographic Wing (attached to FEAF), moves from Hollandia, New Guinea to Morotai with F-7s.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s bomb Haroekoe Drome on Haroekoe Island off Ambon Island; Amahai Airfield on Amahai Island south of Ceram; Old Namlea Airfield on Buru Island; and Liang Airfield on Ambon Island. B-25s, P-38s, and P-47s on small raids hit shore positions at Galela Bay on Galela Island, while covering an attempted rescue of a downed pilot by a PT boat, and bomb the Goeroea supply area in the Moluccas Islands.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: As U.S. Seventh Fleet task groups move west through the Mindanao Sea, covered by escort aircraft carrier aircraft of USN Task Unit 77.12.7, which make a few air strikes. This task unit consists of the escort aircraft carriers USS Kadashan Bay with Composite Squadron Twenty, Manila Bay with VC-80, Marcus Island with VC-21, Natoma Bay with VC-81, Ommaney Bay with VC-75 and Savo Island with VC-27.
    Japanese planes, including kamikazes, begin strikes that damage light cruiser USS Nashville and destroyer USS Haraden off the southwestern coast of Negros Island. Both ships retire. From the Action Reports of the USN destroyer USS Allen M. Sumner that supported the landings on Mindanao, Philippine Islands: At 1010 hours 13 December formed cruising disposition M-IV. At 1548 hours light cruiser USS Nashville hit by suicide bomber; observed dense cloud of black smoke followed by flames in vicinity of number one stack. Went to General Quarters, increased speed and fishtailed.
    From 1507 to 1900 hours many bogies reported by ships of the formation. At 1756 hours sighted Jap plane bearing 125º True., distant six miles with two USAAF P-38s on his tail. One P-38 set Jap port wing on fire with machine guns. The Jap then put his plane in a left turn and dive, and dove for a destroyer in the screen in about station number 16. On the way down he dropped his bomb. Machine gun fire caused the plane to miss and crash astern by 200 yards.
    At 1758 hours opened fire with main battery on Jap "Betty" bearing 260º True, range 5 miles. Crossing bow from port to starboard. Plane turned left and was engaged by Combat Air Patrol which shot him down bearing 340º True, distant about 8 miles. This plane caught fire on crashing. At 1812 hours a low flying Jap plane was sighted, being engaged by six or eight planes of the CAP which first set him on fire and then splashed him bearing 340º True, distant about 6 miles at 1814 hours. At 1813 hours another low flying Jap plane was engaged by two planes of the CAP and splashed by them one minute later bearing 349º True, distant about 3 miles.This plane bounced off the water two or three times at altitudes of about 50 feet, then dropped its right wing and crashed.
    All Japs were twin engine bombers. At 1815 hours possible periscope reported by destroyer USS Barton. At 1816 hours headed for periscope at flank speed. Investigation showed object to be ends of poles used by native fishermen. At 1851 hours fired at Jap plane, no results. At 1935 hours secured from General quarters. From 1935 hours 13 December to 1630 hours 14 December all quiet except for occasional bogey reports from ships of the formation.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 32d Infantry Division makes limited progress southward; the southern-most elements are isolated from the main body and out of food. A Japanese counterattack, during the night of 13/14 December, penetrates the command post of the 126th Infantry Regiment. The Japanese are driven back before dawn. The 2d Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, again attempts to take the ridge southeast of Limon but cannot advance. In the XXIV Corps area, the 305th Infantry Regiment, making the main effort of the 77th Infantry Division, is held up in the Cogon area, north of the Antilao River on Highway 2 just north of Ormoc, where the Japanese are strongly entrenched and hold a blockhouse strongpoint.
    A special Task Force under Colonel Paul L. Freeman, consisting of Companies E and L, is unable to take the blockhouse by storm. The 306th Infantry Regiment assists the 305th with fire. The 307th Infantry Regiment, on the left flank, drives west along the Ormoc-Linao road and takes Linao. Japanese positions in the Cogon area are shelled during the night of 13/14 December. The 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, starts northeast from Ormoc Bay in an effort to make contact with the 11th Airborne Division moving west.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Carolina and Talisay Airfields on Negros Island and B-25s bomb San Roque Airfield on Mindanao Island. Other B-25s and B-24s on reconnaissance hit targets of opportunity in the Sulu Archipelago.

    1945

     
  16. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1937
    JAPAN: The Japanese apologize for the sinking of the USN river gunboat USS Panay (PR-5) in China on 12 December. The U.S. Roosevelt administration demanded formal apologies, reparations, and guarantees against future Japanese attacks against U.S. ships on Chinese waters. The Japanese government formally apologizes and gives the necessary assurances the same day. On 25 December, Secretary of State Cordell Hull acknowledges the Japanese reply.


    1939
    CHINA: Nationalist Chinese forces occupy the town of Ningxian after a bitter clash with the Communists.

    1941
    AUSTRALIA: The Australian "Gull Force" departs Darwin, Northern Territory, for Ambon Island in the Netherlands East Indies. The force consists of 2/21st Battalion of the 23d Brigade, "C" Troop of the 18th Antitank Battery and supporting troops. The troops are in two Dutch ship escorted by the Australian light cruiser HMAS Adelaide (D 47) and minesweeper HMAS Ballarat (J 184).

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: USN Task Force 11 (Vice Admiral Wilson Brown Jr.), comprising the aircraft carrier USS Lexington (CV-2), three heavy cruisers, nine destroyers, and oiler USS Neosho (AO-23), sails to raid Japanese forces in Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Island to relieve pressure on Wake Island.
    U.S. Coast Guard buoy tender USCGC Kukui reaches Niihau Island with squad of soldiers from Company M, 299th Infantry Regiment. The detachment learns of the events that have transpired on Niihau since Japanese Naval Aviation Pilot First Class NISHIKAICHI Shigenori crashed there on 7 December.

    JAPAN: Imperial General Headquarters orders Japanese Navy submarines to shell the U.S. West Coast. Vice Admiral SHIMIZU Mitsumi, commander of the Advance Expeditionary Force (Sixth Fleet), issues a detailed order on the targets. The HIJMS I-15, -9, -10, -17, -19, -21, -23, -25 and -26 are each to fire 30 rounds on the night of 25 December. Rear Admiral SATO Tsutomu, aboard the I-9, is charged to execute the order.

    MALAYA: Japanese forces land on Penang Isaland. Penang's military importance lay in the island's port facilities and its stocks of ammunition and stores. When the Allies were unable to stop the Japanese advance on the mainland it became clear that the island would have to be evacuated.
    On the west coast, the Indian 11th Division completes their withdrawal to Gurun; the Japanese, in close pursuit, penetrate the new positions, during the night of 14/15 December. The Krohcol force is dissolved and its components, which are put under command of the Indian 12th Brigade, move to the Baling area, about 9 miles west of Kroh. The Indian III Corps sends small detachments to guard the Grik road, which is now uncovered. On the east coast, the Kelantan force continues fighting withdrawal. Since airdromes on Singapore Island are becoming congested, preparations are being made to base air units in the Netherlands East Indies.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Norwegian motorship MS Hoegh Merchant is torpedoed and sunk by Japanese submarine HIJMS I-4 about 29 miles off Cape Makapuu on the southeastern tip of Oahu Island. All hands (35-man crew, 5 passengers) survive the loss of the ship.
    USN gunboat USS Erie (PG-50), off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, boards and takes charge of motor vessel MV Sea Boy, and takes off a Japanese POW; she orders Sea Boy into Balboa, Canal Zone, the following day.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The Japanese Vigan and Aparri detachments are placed under the same command and ordered, after the Aparri force joins the Vigan at Vigan, to march south to Lingayen Gulf.
    The USN withdraws the few remaining PBY Catalinas of Patrol Wing Ten (PatWing 10) and the three tenders servicing the aircraft from the Philippine Islands. The ships are the seaplane tenders (destroyer) USS Childs (AVD-1) and William B. Preston (AVD-7) and the small seaplane tender USS Heron (AVP-2).
    Far East Air Force B-17s are sent against the Japanese beachhead at Legaspi, Luzon, and damage a freighter and a tanker. First Lieutenant Hewitt T Wheless is later awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for bringing his bullet-riddled B-17 back from the mission to an emergency crashlanding at Cagayan, Mindanao Island.
    A USN boarding party transported in commandeered yacht Gem, seizes the 14,242 ton French motor mail vessel SS Marechal Joffre, in Manila Bay. The majority of the crewmen, pro-Vichy or unwilling to serve under the U.S. flag, are transported ashore. The ship, manned by a scratch crew that includes aviation personnel from Patrol Wing Ten (PatWing 10), departs Manila Bay on 18 December bound for Balikpapan, Dutch Borneo, whence she proceeded to Australia, New Zealand, and the U.S. She arrives in San Francisco, California, with a cargo of wool and zircon sand on 19 April 1942. The following day, she is taken over by the U.S. Maritime Commission and transferred to the USN. She as commissioned on 27 April 1942 as transport USS Rochambeau (AP-63).

    WAKE ISLAND: Two raids by Japanese naval aircraft are flown by aircraft based in the Marshall Islands. Early in the morning, "Mavis" flying boats bomb the island. At 1100 hours, 30 "Nell" bombers arrive from Roi Island in Kwajalein Atoll. They kill two marines and wound another but more seriously, they destroy one of the two remaining F4F-3 Wildcats.


    1942
    JAPAN: USN submarine USS Sunfish lays mines in entrance to Iseno Umi Bay. She continues these mining operations in those waters through 17 December.

    NEW GUINEA: The convoy of five destroyers reaches the Mambare River mouth early in morning and unload about 800 men without being detected. Allied planes subsequently deliver damaging attacks on troops, supplies, and landing craft.
    On the Sanananda front, a supply party succeeds in breaking through to the roadblock. West of the block, Company K and Cannon Company are relieved by Australian troops and move to the rear. On the Urbana Force front, Companies I and K of the 127th Infantry Regiment move cautiously to Buna Village after an artillery and mortar preparation and find it empty of Japanese. The Australian 2/9th Battalion, 18th Brigade and six tanks being moving to Hariko from Oro
    Bay. USAAF Fifth Air Force transports establish a record for Papuan campaign by bringing 578 tons of materiel to Dobodura and Popondetta airfields.
    In Papua New Guinea, the five Japanese troop-carrying destroyers attack by USAAF Fifth Air Force aircraft yesterday, reach the mouth of the Mambare River and unload without being detected. However, medium and light bombers and fighters, along with Australian aircraft, subsequently deliver damaging blows against these troops and their supplies and also hit forces along the Kumusi River in the Cape Endaiadere area and along the Mambare River. The five destroyers are attacked off Cape Ward Hunt by medium and heavy bombers. Attacks are also carried out against the Lae Airfield and the airfield on Gasmata Island, Bismarck Archipelago. The Japanese use a seaborne landing 30 miles (48 kilometers) west of Gona to outflank the Australians.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: During the night of 14/15 December on board USN submarine USS Grayback, on war patrol in the Bismarck Archipelago, an appendectomy commences at 2300 hours by Pharmacist's Mate First Class Harry B. Roby, USNR, on Torpedoman First Class W.R. Jones. The surgery is completed by 0200 hours. This is the second of three such procedures that will be performed on board U.S. submarines during the war.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal Islands, additional elements of the Army’s Americal Division arrive. B-17s attack Buin on Bougainville Island with no losses.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 16 B-24's, flying out of bases in the Ellice , bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 13 B-25's, with fighter escort, bomb Shasi; 2 P-40's strafe supply trucks S of Tengchung. 6 P-40's on armed reconnaissance strafe Gia Lam Airfield and railroad yard in French Indochina.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): SOLOMON ISLANDS: Eighteen USAAF Thirteenth Air Force B-24s, with fighter support, bomb positions on Sohano Island while 18 B-25s and eight fighters hit Manob village east of Buka Passage.
    Other Thirteenth Air Force fighters hit gun positions, communications targets, and other targets of opportunity at scattered points in the Bougainville-Shortland areas and cover USN SBDs strikes against antiaircraft positions in Chabai area on Bougainville Island. Sixteen USMC TBFs attack reverse slope targets that cannot be hit by artillery. The TBFs, guided by smoke, attack a 150 yard by 50 yard area from 700 feet. About 180 of the 192 100-pound bombs strike the target area but they do not dislodge the Japanese defenders.
    At Lambu Lambu Cove, Vella Lavella Island, a faulty fuel pump ignites a gasoline dump that in turn explodes an ammunition dump. The resultant fire destroys motor torpedo boat PT-239

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): In the heaviest raid to date in the Southwest Pacific Area, 228 B-24's, B-25's, and A-20's bomb Arawe in an almost continuous attack from 0645 to 1548 hours; P-39's strafe barges along the Huon Peninsula. Gasmata is hit by B-25's and B-26's. B-24's on armed reconnaissance hit Saidor, Gasmata and Unea.

    RAAF: Lost on a flight from Cooktown to Horn Island is C-47 Dakota A65-3.

    AUSTRALIA: Final plans for the operation against Cape Gloucester, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago, are made. It is decided not to use airborne troops as planned.

    1944
    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-25s bomb Loi Mwe, Burma while 10 P-38s and P-51s hit Kentung, China.
    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 20: 48 B-29s, flying out of the Calcutta, India area, are sent to bomb a railroad bridge at Bangkok; 33 hit the primary and 14 others hit targets of opportunity and alternate targets; they claim 0-1-0 enemy aircraft; 4 B-29s are lost.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command area, the Japanese garrison of Bhamo prepares to withdraw. The U.S. 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special) repels another Japanese attack on Tonk-wa, after which their activity subsides to patrolling; makes patrol contact with the British 36th Division at Katha.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 12 B-25s again bomb the supply and personnel area at Mongmit; Bodegon railroad bridge is severely damaged by 4 P-47s; 48 P-47s hit troop concentrations, supplies, and areas of active enemy movement at Nawngkyaung and Kunlong, China and Panghkam, Hohai, Dobin, Kyaukpyintha, and Ho-naw; 4 others support ground forces near Tonkwa. Large-scale transport operations to forward areas continue. The Japanese garrison at Bhamo, Burma prepares to withdraw. The 1st Fighter Squadron (Commando), 2d Air Commando Group, arrives at Kalaikunda, India from the US with P-51s (first mission is 14 Feb 45).

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 24 Saipan based B-24s pound Iwo Jima. During the night of 14/15 Dec, 6 B-24s from Guam and Saipan fly individual snooper strikes against Iwo Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The 38th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Thirteenth AAF [attached to 4th Photographic Group (Reconnaissance)] arrives at Hollandia, New Guinea from the US with B-25s (first mission is 21 Feb 45); the 340th Fighter Squadron, 348th FG, moves from Tacloban to Tanauan, Leyte Island with P-47s; the 550th Night Fighter Squadron, XIII Fighter Command, arrives at Hollandia, New Guinea from the US with P-61s (first mission is 15 Jan 45).

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s bomb Namlea on Buru Island. Other planes carry out sweeps, armed reconnaissance, and light raids against various targets one Halmahera Island, northern Borneo, and the Sulu Archipelago.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: On Palawan Island, 150 American POWs are incarcerated in a POW enclosure situated on top of the cliffs overlooking the Bay of Puerto Princesa. While working on the construction of an airfield they are made to dig three trenches 150-feet long and 4.5-feet deep within the camp. They are told that the trenches are air-raid shelters and practice drills are carried out. The shelters are small and cramped, the prisoners sitting bunched up with their knees under their chins.
    When a USN convoy is sighted heading for Mindoro Island, an air-raid alarm is sounded. The Japanese guards, thinking the island is about to be invaded, herd the prisoners into the covered trenches and then proceed to pour buckets of gasoline into the entrances followed by a match to ignite the fuel. As the prisoners storm the exits, their clothes on fire, they are mowed down by light machine-gun fire or bayoneted, shot or clubbed. Dozens manage to get through the barbed wire and tumble down the 50-foot high cliff to the waters edge only to be shot at by a Japanese manned landing barge which is patrolling the shore.
    Only five survive by swimming across the bay and reaching the safety of a Filipino guerrilla camp. One prisoner, who tries to swim the bay, is recaptured and brought back to the beach. There, he suffers the agony of having gasoline poured on his foot and set alight. His screams delight the guards who then deliberately set fire to his other foot while at the same time prodding and stabbing his body with bayonets until he collapses. His body is then doused with gasoline and cremated. His remains, and the bodies of the other dead on the beach, are then buried in the sand. U.S. Forces capture Puerto Princesa on 28 February 1945, and weeks later discover 79 skeletons within the enclosure and they are given a proper burial. In all, 145 Americans are killed.
    In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 126th and 127th Infantry Regiments, 32d Infantry Division, pressing slowly southward down Highway 2, come up against the Japanese main line of resistance on a series of ridges commanding the highway and for the next few days can make only minor gains. The 2d Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, succeeds in dislodging the Japanese from the ridge southeast of Limon. The 12th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), which has been patrolling in the Mt Cabungaan area, is ordered west to block Highway 2 south of the 32d Infantry Division and then attack north toward that division. In the XXIV Corps area, the 305th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division, reduces the opposition in the Cogon area, Task Force Freeman taking the blockhouse and road junction north of Ormoc to sever the Japanese line of communication. The 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, is advancing steadily over precipitous terrain
    toward 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division.
    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators bomb airfields on Negros Island and B-25s hit Zettlefield airdrome on Jolo Island. Other planes carry out sweeps, armed reconnaissance, and light raids against various targets in the central Philippine Islands, Luzon, Mindanao and Palawan Islands.
    Aircraft of the USN's Third Fleet's fast carrier groups begin attacks on Japanese airfields on Luzon. The Japanese continue air attacks on the Mindoro-bound task groups of USN Seventh Fleet.
    Twenty four Australian (PBY) Catalinas of Nos. 11 and 43 Squadrons, begin operations from Leyte conducting a minelaying mission in Manila Bay, Luzon.



    1945
     
  17. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1931
    CHINA: General Chiang Kai-shek resigns as President of the Nanking Government stating "but realizing . . . that a successful safeguard against foreign invasion depends upon the cessation of civil trouble and the unification of the country, I decided temporarily to leave my duties. . . . I therefore request the Central Government to accept my resignation from my offices so as to enhance the realization of unification and accomplish the purpose of national salvation. . . ." Canton leaders plan to go to Nanking. ". . . so that a National Government might be established at an early date for the solution of the national crisis."


    1941

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: USN seaplane tender USS Tangier (AV-8 ), oiler USS Neches (AO-5), and four destroyers sail for Wake Island.
    Kahului on northern Maui Island, is shelled by a Japanese submarine from the Second Submarine Squadron. Possible candidates for having carried out the shelling are HIJMS I-2, I-3, I-4, I-5, I-6, or I-7.

    HONG KONG: A Japanese attempt to move from Kowloon to Hong Kong Island is defeated.

    JOHNSTON ATOLL: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-122 surfaces and shells this U.S. possession causing slight damage to a few buildings and no casualties. One shell lands astern and another passes over her forecastle of USN transport USS William Ward Burrows (AP-6) but apparently she is unseen by the Japanese and she is not hit. The atoll consists of two small islets, Johnston and Sand Islands, located about 712 nautical miles WSW of Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii.

    MALAYA: The Indian III Corps remains under strong pressure on the west coast. During the night of 15/16 December, the Indian 11th Division begins a withdrawal from the Gurun positions to the Muda River. The garrison of Penang Island. fortress, opposite RAF Butterworth, prepares to withdraw as the RAF abandons Butterworth airdrome.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: Major General Lewis H Brereton, Commanding General Far East Air Force, receives permission to withdraw the few remaining B-17s to Bachelor Field, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The air defense of the Philippines is left to the few remaining fighters.

    UNITED STATES: The Congress passes a military appropriation bill of $10 billion for the defense of the country.
    After a brief visit to Hawaii, Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox tells the press, "I think the most effective Fifth Column work of the entire war was done in Hawaii with the possible exception of Norway" - this despite the complete lack of evidence of such sabotage.
    Norman Corwin's production of "We Hold These Truths," commissioned by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and starring Orson Welles, is broadcast simultaneously on all four national US radio networks CBS, Mutual and NBC's Red and Blue Networks. It reaches an estimated audience of 63 million people, the largest ever for a dramatic production of any kind.
    Admiral Ernest J. King is offered the post of Commander in Chief U.S. Fleet. He accepts.
    An American Federation of Labor (AFL) council adopts a no-strike policy in war industries, which include automotive plants being converted to military production (domestic automobile manufacturing stopped completely from 1941 to 1944).

    WAKE ISLAND: Early in the morning, "Mavis" flying boats bomb the island.


    1942
    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Australian 2/7th Cavalry Regiment, 7th Division, begins arriving at Soputa. On the Urbana front, the 2d Battalion, 128th Infantry Regiment, employing a small force of 80-odd men immediately available, attacks and encircles Coconut Grove, the last Japanese position on the west bank of Entrance Creek. After nightfall, a Dutch freighter unloads additional Australian tanks and cargo at Oro Bay. The tanks are moved forward to Hariko and, with others already there, are organized into X Squadron of the Australian 2/6th Armoured Regiment.
    In Papua New Guinea, Fifth Air Force A-20s hit Japanese forces along the Mambare River while a B-24s bombs a wrecked ship at Gona.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: During the next ten days, Rear Adm. Tanaka Raizo’s Tokyo Express also runs supply missions to Munda airfield on New Georgia Island, while still making express runs to Guadalcanal Island.
    Two radar-equipped PBY-5A Catalinas of USN Patrol Squadron Twelve arrive on Guadalcanal from Nandi in the Fiji Islands to begin night operations. As a result of the matte-black paint schemes and night-time bombing operations conducted by the squadron, VP-12 officially becomes known as a "Black Cat" squadron, along with VP-11, VP-91 and VP-51. The area of operations during this period is concentrated around Guadalcanal.

    UNITED KINGDOM: British Prime Minister Winston Churchill informs Australian Prime Minister John Curtin that shipping will be available at the end of January 1943 to transport the Australian 9th Division with minimal equipment from North Africa to Australia. Churchill says, "the 9th Australian Division would carry with them from the African desert a splendid reputation, and the honour of having played a leading part in a memorable victory for the Empire and the common cause."

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 20 B-24's from Nanumea in the Ellice , hit Maloelap Atoll in the Marshalls. 10, staging from Canton in the Phoenix through Baker, bomb Wotje Atoll. 1 B-24 is lost on Maloelap Atoll raid; 2 enemy fighters are claimed destroyed.

    INDIA: Eastern Air Command (EAC), a combined US-British air command, is formed under Lieutenant General George E Stratemeyer (USAAF), with Air Vice Marshall Thomas M Williams (RAF) as Assistant Commander. HQ, at New Delhi, will control all operational air units in Assam and Burma which presently make up the USAAF Tenth Air Force and RAF Bengal Air Command. Major components of EAC are to be the Third Tactical Air Force under Air Marshall Sir John E Baldwin (RAF), Strategic Air Force under Brigadier General Howard C Davidson (USAAF), Troop Carrier Command under Brigadier General William D Old (USAAF), and Photo Reconnaissance Force under Group Captain (= USAAF Colonel) Stewart G Wise (RAF). The Strategic Air Force and Troop Carrier Command are activated on this date, the former having headquarters at Belvedere Palace, Calcutta and the latter at Comilla.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, Lakona, 15 miles north of Finschhafen, is captured by Australian forces. The road from Lae to Nadzab is completed.

    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 25 P-40's strafe parked aircraft, trucks, and several buildings at Pailochi; at least 3 enemy airplanes are destroyed; 2 B-25's on a sea sweep over the Gulf of Tonkin claim 1 ocean going tug sunk; 16 P-40's on armed reconnaissance strafe the towns of Owchihkow and Shihshow; 6 others attack the town of Luchiangpa and villages in the area.

    BURMA: In the north, the 1st Battalion, of 114th Infantry Regiment, Chinese 38th Infantry Division, tries unsuccessfully to relieve the isolated 1st Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment. After the attack, the Japanese return to their previous positions, which they proceed to strengthen.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): 21 B-24's strike Sohano ; 6 B-25's hit installations in the Numa Numa-Arigua area; 23 B-25's and 16 fighters attack Buka , causing heavy damage in the Chinatown area; P-40's destroy bridge at Runai. Numerous targets of opportunity are attacked by AAF aircraft, operating individually and in small flights, on armed reconnaissance over Bougainville and other N Solomons areas.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): As a preliminary to the main invasion of New Britain in the Bismarck Archipelago, US forces under command of Brigadier General Julian W Cunningham land on the W coast of the Arawe Peninsula on New Britain about 0700 local following a naval and air bombardment; B-25's pound villages in the Arawe area; B-24's bomb Cape Gloucester while P-39's strafe barges at Reiss Point. B-25's hit 2 freighters on Timor in the Sunda. The 39th Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group, transfers from Port Moresby's 14 Mile Drome to Nadzab, New Guinea with P-47's.

    BISMARCK ARCHIPELAGO: Operation DEXTERITY opens when, as a preliminary to the main invasion of New Britain Island, USN Task Force 76 (Rear Adm Daniel E. Barbey) lands Task Force DIRECTOR, the 112th Cavalry Regiment (Special) reinforced under command of Brigadier General Julian W. Cunningham, USA, on the coast of Arawe Peninsula about 0700 hours local, after naval gunfire and aerial bombardment. Scattered opposition on the peninsula is overcome without difficulty. Before the main landing, cavalrymen try in vain to make surprise landings at Umtingalu, on the mainland east of the peninsula, and on Pilelo islet.
    Despite alerted Japanese forces, Troop B succeeds in landing on Pilelo and quickly clears it. Japanese planes are active against troops and shipping, attacking at frequent intervals during this and the next few days. Plans to use Arawe as a base for light naval forces never materialize, nor is the site used as an air base. The plan for the Cape Gloucester landing is amended to increase the size of initial assault force and limit the objective of the secondary landing.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: Army Major General Oscar Griswold, Commanding General XIV Corps, relieves Marine Major General Roy Geiger, Commanding General I Amphibious Corps, of responsibility for the Bougainville beachhead, where the final defensive perimeter is virtually secure, although the 21st Marine Regiment, 3d Marine Division, is still clearing the heights near the beachhead.
    Twenty one USAAF Thirteenth Air Force B-24s strike Sohano Island. On Bougainville, six B-25s hit installations in the Numa Numa-Arigua area; 23 B-25s and 16 fighters attack Buka Island, causing heavy damage in the Chinatown area; and P-40s destroy a bridge at Runai. Numerous targets of opportunity are attacked by USAAF aircraft, operating individually and in small flights, on armed reconnaissance over Bougainville and other northern Solomons areas.

    1944
    USA: The newly created five start rank of "General of the Army" is awarded to General MacArthur, Eisenhower, Arnold and Marshall.

    AUSTRALIA: Sir Frederick Geoffrey Shedden, Australian Secretary of the Department of Defence, writes to U.S. General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific, asking why Australian troops are not being used in the Philippines and claiming that "Australian opinion considered it a point of honour for their troops to be used in such operations."

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: The USN's Battleships Pacific Fleet command is divided into two battleship squadrons. Battleship Squadron ONE is commanded by Vice Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf and Battleship Squadron TWO Vice Admiral Willis A. "Ching" Lee.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 6 B-25s blast a storage building at Kunlong, China. 5 P-51s hit and damage a bridge and a building S of Huizan, Thailand. 4 P-38s knock out a bridge at Hawng Luk, Burma.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 10 B-25s destroy the Hsipaw railroad bridge and a bypass bridge at Namhkai and damage other bridges at Namhkai; 4 P-47s severely damage 2 bridges at Ho-hko; 7 P-47s fly close support strikes along the Namh-Kam-Bhamo road; the Japanese garrison at Bhamo escapes through Chinese lines early in the morning and later Chinese troops occupy the town; 13 P-47s hit Lashio Airfield; town areas, troop concentrations, and supply areas are attacked at Panglong, Nanponpon, Panghkam, Kinu, Man Hpai, and Namhkam; a steady air movement of men and supplies to forward bases and frontline areas continues. The 2d Fighter Squadron (Commando), 2d Air Commando Group, arrives at Kalaikunda, India from the US with P-51s (first mission is 14 Feb 45).

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command area, the Japanese garrison of Bhamo escapes through Chinese lines early in morning and the relief force south of the town begins to disengage. The Chinese 38th Division moves into Bhamo. The Chinese Army in India (CAI) and Yunnan Force (Y-Force) are only 50 air miles apart. The 112th Regiment, Chinese 38th Division, which was recently withdrawn from the Bhamo battle, is driving on Namhkam. Elements of the U.S. 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special) move from the Mo-hlaing to the Tonk-wa area.
    In the British Fourteenth Army area, XV Corps makes rapid strides on the Arakan front. The West African 82d Division takes Buthidaung and establishes a bridgehead across the Kalapanzin River.
    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 13 B-24s from Guam bomb Iwo Jima. During the night of 15/16 Dec, a B-24 on a snooper raid from Guam hits Iwo Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA: HQ 310th Bombardment Wing (Medium) moves from Leyte Island to San Jose, Mindoro Island, Philippine Islands; the 36th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Fifth AF, arrives are Hollandia, New Guinea from the US with F-5s (first mission is 25 Mar 45); the 341st Fighter Squadron, 348th FG, moves from Tacloban to Tanauan, with P-47s; the ground echelon of the 418th Night Fighter Squadron, Thirteenth AF, arrives at San Jose from Dulag (air echelon is on Morotai with P-61s.)

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s hit airfields on Ceram and Ambon Islands. Miscellaneous armed reconnaissance and light raids by fighters and bombers are flown against airfields on Boeroe and Halmahera Islands. Shipping and other targets of opportunity are attacked at several points throughout the Netherlands East Indies.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Hawkbill sinks Japanese destroyer HIJMS Momo west of Luzon about 167 nautical miles W of Baguio, Philippine Islands, in position 16.40N, 117.42E.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The Western Visayan Task Force invades Mindoro Island at 0735 hours local after a preparatory bombardment. The 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, lands between Caminawit Point and San Agustin; the reinforced 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment, less Company C, on the beach fronting San Agustin; Company, 503d, across the river mouth from San Agustin. From San Agustin, the 3d Battalion, 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment drives inland about 8 miles to final the beachhead line, securing the airstrip, sugar plant, and village of San Jose without opposition. The 19th Infantry Regiment also drives inland to the final beachhead line, the only contact with the Japanese being made at Caminawit Point. The Western Visayan Task Force suffers no casualties. Rear Admiral Arthur Struble, commander of Task Group 78.3, turns over command ashore to Brigadier General William Dunckel, Chief of Planning Division Southwest Pacific Area. Airdrome construction is begun at once and a new site, about 2 miles NW of White Beach, is selected. Although there is no ground opposition, Kamikazes are active: two tank landing ships damaged off the southern tip of Mindoro, are scuttled by destroyer USS Hall. Elsewhere off Mindoro, Japanese Kamikazes damage the escort aircraft carrier USS Marcus Island; destroyers USS Paul Hamilton and Howorth; and motor torpedo boat PT-223.
    In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte Island, the 1st Squadron ( ) of 12th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) starts west toward Highway 2, reaching previously a selected drop area, a banana plantation about 1,800 yards E of Lonoy; the rest of the regiment joins the 1st Squadron there by 17 December. In the XXIV Corps area, with the port of Ormoc sealed off, the 77th Infantry Division pauses to consolidate. The 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, makes contact with the 11th Airborne Division's 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, Company G of which enters its lines. Company G has been isolated for four days. It is decided to withdraw the 1st and 3d Battalions of the 32d Infantry Regiment to clear pockets in the Ormoc area and let the 2d Battalion continue eastward to establish contact with the rest of 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment force.
    In major strikes of the day, USAAF Far East Air Forces fighter-bombers hit a fuel dump at San Fernando on Negros Island; B-24s and B-25s bomb Sasa and San Roque Airfields on Mindanao Island; and B-24s bomb Puerto Princesa on Palawan Island.
    Marjor Richard I. "Dick" Bong shoots down a Japanese "Oscar" fighter. This is his 39th victory.

    UNITED STATES: USN Admiral William D. Leahy, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), is promoted to the (five star) rank of Fleet Admiral.
    The USAAF activates Headquarters, Continental Air Force (CAF) at Bolling Field, Washington, D.C., to coordinate the work of the four domestic air forces (First, Second, Third and Fourth) and the I Troop Carrier Command but will not assume jurisdiction until 8 May 1945. On 21 March 1946, CAF is redesignated Strategic Air Command (SAC).

    1945

     
  18. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1941
    CANADA: P.C. 9760 is passed requiring mandatory registration of all persons of Japanese origin, regardless of citizenship, with Registrar of Enemy Aliens.

    CHINA: The U.S. War Department gives Brigadier General John Magruder, head of American Military Mission to China (AMMISCA), permission to divert Chinese lend-lease to the British, provided the Chinese agree.

    EAST INDIES: Australian troop invade Portuguese East Timor, the first time in history that Australia violated another country's neutrality. The Australian "Sparrow Force" invades Dutch West Timor and the 2/2nd Independent Company lands on the shore near Dili, the capital of Portuguese East Timor and so pre-empt a Japanese takeover. They proceed immediately to surround the airport. Well armed, and expecting to do battle with the Portuguese military, they approach the administration building, guns at the ready. Suddenly the main door opens and out stepped a civilian Portuguese official who tips his hat and in perfect English said "Good afternoon." Dumbfounded, the troops star at each other in disbelief. Not a shot has been fired. Unknown to the troops if "Sparrow Force," the Australian and Portuguese governments had previously agreed to a peaceful "invasion" of the island to help protect the inhabitants from a possible Japanese invasion which did in fact take place two months later, on 20 February 1942.
    The Japanese invade British Borneo, landing on the north coast at Miri, Sarawak, and at Seria, Brunei. The Japanese quickly captured the government buildings and the post office at Miri as well as the surrounding district with plantations. In the meantime, other units landed near Seria and occupied the large copra plantations, the Seria oilfields, and the strategic sector north of Seria to prepare for an attack against Brunei. There is very little resistance by the British forces, and during the morning the two units secure the oilfield at Seria and oilfields and airfield at Miri. The main body of the Kawaguchi Detachment find only about 50 members of the police unit defending Miri. They surrender with very little fighting. Two companies of the 2nd Yokosuka Special Naval Landing Force landed on the coast near Lutong and within two and a half hours captured the important Lutong oil refinery. It then proceeded to occupy and secure the Miri airfield without meeting any resistance. Part of the Detachment is immediately assigned the mission of restoring the oilfields at Miri and Seria, while, after 17 December, the main body of the Detachment prepares for the next operation - the landing at Kuching. The Japanese troops suffered only 40 casualties between 16 and 23 December, most were drownings as a result of Japanese amphibious operations.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: Task Force 14 (Rear Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher), comprising aircraft carrier USS Saratoga, with Marine Fighting Squadron Two Hundred Twenty One embarked with F2A-3 Buffalos, heavy cruisers USS Astoria (flagship), Minneapolis , and San Francisco ; and nine destroyers, sails from Pearl Harbor. These ships will overtake the force formed around seaplane tender USS Tangier (AV-8 ) and oiler USS Neches (AO-5) and their consorts. These ships are carrying supplies, reinforcements, and aircraft for relief of Wake.

    MALAYA: The Indian 11th Division completes their withdrawal behind the Muda River in Wellesley Province and defeats Japanese efforts to secure a foothold on the south bank. The Indian III Corps decides to withdraw the Indian 11th Division behind the Krian River because it is greatly weakened by sustained fighting without benefit of tank and adequate air support. Fighting develops on the Grik road north of Grik, during the night of 16/17 December, as a small detachment guarding the road encounters the main body of the Japanese Patani force thrusting toward Kuala Kangsar in an effort to isolate the Indian 11th Division on the west coast. On the east coast, Kelantan troops begin a withdrawal by rail as the movement of supplies and equipment is completed. The Penang island fortress is evacuated as planned during the night of 16/17 December.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The 2nd Carrier Squadron of the Carrier Group, Pearl Harbor Strike Force returning to Japan, is detached and assigned to the Wake Invasion Group, South Sea Forces. This squadron consists of the aircraft carriers HIJMS Hiryu and Soryu. Also detached are two heavy cruisers and two destroyers. This unit arrives off Wake Island on 21 December.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: First Lieutenant Boyd D Wagner leads a dive-bombing raid on the airfield at Vigan and shoots down his fifth aircraft, thereby becoming the first USAAF "Ace" in World War II.
    Lieutenant General Douglas MacArthur, Commanding General U.S. Army Forces-Far East, is advised by Headquarters USAAF that 65 B-17s have been allocated to the Far East Air Force. However, they are still in the U.S. and must be ferried to the Philippines via the South Atlantic, Africa and India.

    UNITED STATES: The USN aircraft carrier USS Yorktown departs Norfolk, Virginia, and sails for the Pacific, her secondary gun galleries studded with new 20 mm Oerlikon cannon.

    WAKE ISLAND: Japanese "Nell" bombers from Roi Island in Kwajalein Atoll bomb the island.


    1942
    BURMA: In the Arakan coastal sector, the Eastern Army of India Command, under Lieutenant General N. M. S. Irwin, opens a limited-objective offensive for Akyab Island, at the end of Mayu Peninsula, which at this time is lightly held by the Japanese. Lacking resources for an amphibious assault, as planned originally, an advance is made overland by the Indian 14th Division, which consists at this time of four Indian brigades and is later strengthened by four more Indian brigades and one British brigade. The Indian 123rd Brigade, leading off, finds Maungdaw free of the Japanese and occupies it.

    NEW GUINEA: On the Urbana front in Papua New Guinea, the 2d Battalion of the U.S. 128th Infantry renews the attack on the Coconut Grove and clears it by 1200 hours; they also establish a bridgehead across Entrance Creek, where engineers repair a bridge, from which to attack the Triangle. A platoon of Company F, 126th Infantry, called the Schwartz patrol, is ordered to Tarakena, west of Siwori, to protect the left flank.
    In the Gona area, the Australian 39th Battalion and 2/14th Battalion, 21st Brigade, 7th Division, compete their encirclement of the Japanese at the creek mouth west of Gona. Meanwhile, the 36th Battalion, 30th Brigade, and the 2/7th Cavalry Regiment, serving as infantry, arrive at Soputa. The 39th Battalion Australian Militia Force and 2/14th Battalion Australian Imperial Force have skirmished from Gona towards Haddy's Village, 2 miles to the west, to delay and destroy reinforcements landed by the Japanese some days earlier. Lieutenant Colonel Ralph Honner's 39th Battalion are moving by an inland route while Lieutenant Colonel Challen's 2/14the Battalion moves along the coast.
    This is where the Japanese 3rd Battalion, 170th Regiment had landed between the Kumusi and Amboga on the night of ½ December. Together with stragglers from the Kokoda Track fighting Honner estimates the Japanese to muster about 600 personnel. Having fenced in the Japanese at Haddy's village between the sea (north), creek (west) and the Australians (south and east), the final actions next day saw 170 Japanese buried in the village area and an estimate of at least the same number (if not more) in the preliminaries. The cost is a total of 129 casualties (2 officers and 105 Other Ranks from the 39th Battalion). The 39th Battalion is critical to the success of the Kokoda track and the Gona/Buna battles.
    In Papua New Guinea, USAAF A-20s and B-26s hit forces in the Buna area and at the mouth of the Kumusi River, and strafe barges on the lagoon shoreline south of the Kumusi's mouth. Meanwhile, B-24s attack a wreck off Gona.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s attack a cargo vessel in the Bismarck Sea, and a destroyer, two cargo ships and two tankers in the Solomon Sea, southeast of Cape Orford on New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, Major General Alexander M. Patch, Commanding General I Corps, orders the 132d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, to occupy Mt. Austen, which dominates the island, as a preliminary to a major offensive to be undertaken in January 1943.
    B-17s of the 5th BG attack the airstrip at Munda, New Georgia Island. They are met by 16 Zekes; the B-17s claim four Zekes with the loss of one B-17.

    1943
    CHINA (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 9 B-25's and 11 P-40's hit the NW part of Owchihkow; 4 B-25's on sweeps over the S China Sea damage freighter S of Nampang , bomb Tunguan docks, and shoot down 1 bomber; 15 P-40's on armed reconnaissance strafe Pailochi Airfield; 11 others strafe boats in channels N of Nanhsien; 6 P-38's strafe a troop train near Changanyi and attack 25 sampans (destroying most of them) on the Yangtze River just above Huangtang Lake.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): In the Solomon, 14 B-24's bomb Monoitu on Bougainville . Smaller flights of B-24's bomb Poporang and Sohano , and dispersal areas at Bonis Airfield on Bougainville. 5 B-25's, with fighter cover, hit Sankau. RNZAF Ventura's attack targets on Green and in the Mawareka, Marveiropa, and Mamaregu areas. Fighter aircraft support USN dive bomber strikes on Sohano and gun positions at Bonis and afterwards strafe targets of opportunity at several points on Bougainville. The 67th Fighter Squadron, 347th FG, which has been operating from New Georgia with P-39's since Oct 43, returns to it's base on Woodlark.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): Lost on a mission against Gasmata is B-24D 42-41043. B-24's hit Cape Gloucester Airfield. On New Guinea, B-25's hit Sio and Kelana Harbor and P-40's hit Timoeka. HQ 348th FG transfers from Port Moresby to Finschhafen, New Guinea. The 9th Fighter Squadron, 49th FG, transfers from Dobodura to Gusap with P-47's.

    NEW GUINEA: In the Ramu Valley, a patrol of the Australian 2/33rd Battalion, 25th Brigade, 7th Division, finds Japanese troops on the highest pinnacle of the 5800 Feature, 5 miles NE of Kesawai, and withdraw as the artillery fires 120 rounds. By 1700 hours, the Japanese withdraw. In the Huon Peninsula, the Australian 29th/46th Battalion, 4th Brigade, reaches Lakona. The battalion advanced a little over 1 mile in the last six days.

    EAST INDIES: Australian Beaufighters sink a Japanese cargo ship at Lautem, Portugese Timor.

    NEW BRITAIN: Six Ki-49 Helens of the 9th Sentai take off to attack Arawe, but are intercepted over Cape Gloucester. Five are shot down, the last Ki-49 Helen 3297 force lands at Cape Gloucester.

    1944
    UNITED STATES: General George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff U.S. Army, is promoted to the (five star) rank of General of the Army.

    BURMA: In the Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC) area, the U.S. 124th Cavalry Regiment (Special) moves forward from the Myitkyina area toward Bhamo to join in the action.
    In the British Fourteenth Army's IV Corps area, Pinlebu and Banmauk fall to the Indian 19th Division. From Banmauk, a patrol reaches Indaw and makes contact with the British 36th Division, NCAC.

    CHINA: Learning from Brigadier General Frank Dorn, the U.S. adviser to ALPHA forces, that the Chinese 57th Army is refusing to move to defend Kunming, Major General Robert B. McClure, Chief of Staff US Forces US China Theater of Operations, protests to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, and part of the army is flown to the Kunming area. Few of the Chinese forces are in place as planned to stop the Japanese short of Kunming. The Chinese Communist leader Chou En-lai terminates negotiations between Nationalist and Communist Chinese.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, the 16th Fighter Squadron, 51st Fighter Group, based at Chengkung with P-51s, sends a detachment to operate from Liangshan.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 4 P-47s support US ground forces near Tonkwa; locomotives, storage areas, buildings, personnel, and areas of Japanese activity are attacked at Se-eng, Nanponpon, Kangon, Winghsa, Inywa, Molo, and Mabein. Large-scale air supply to forward areas continues. The 127th, 155th and 156th Liaison Squadrons (Commando), 2d Air Commando Group, arrive at Kalaikunda, India from the US with UC-64s and L-5s.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): Daytime activities are limited to reconnaissance flights by B-24s over the Bonin and Kazan and by P-47s over Pagan. During the night of 16/17 Dec, 3 B-24s from Guam and Saipan fly individual snooper strikes against Iwo Jima.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA [SWPA, Far East Air Force (FEAF)]: The 342d Fighter Squadron, 348th FG, moves from Tacloban Airfield to Tanauan Airfield with P-47s.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-25s, A-20s, and fighter-bombers attack airfields and targets of opportunity including shipping in the Ceram Island area. Targets of opportunity are also attacked in northern Borneo and in the Vogelkop Peninsula area of New Guinea.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The 7,000 ton Japanese freighter SS Oryoku Maru is being used to transport some 1,619 American POWs, mostly officers, to Japan. Marched through the streets of Manila from the Bilibid POW Camp to Pier 7 for boarding, the prisoners are crammed into the holds, standing room only. Also on board are around 700 civilians plus 100 crew and 30 Japanese guards. Already overloaded, the SS Oryoku Maru then takes on about 1,000 Japanese seamen, survivors of ships sunk in Manila Harbor. She is spotted on her next day out at sea by USN planes from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet and attacked.
    Oryoku Maru sails into Subic Bay and is run aground to prevent her sinking. The attack continues over a period of two days in which 286 US soldiers are killed. The survivors, numbering 925, who are forced to swim ashore, are then transported by truck and train to San Fernando and thence to other ships, SS Enoura Maru and SS Brazil Maru. The SS Brazil Maru, which also carries a cargo of 12,000 bags of sugar, sails for Japan on 14 January 1945. Conditions on board are indescribable, hundreds dying on the way from the cold, lack of air and water. On arrival at Moji, Japan, two weeks later, only 475 are alive. Of these, 161 die within the first month ashore. Of the original 1,619 Americans on board the SS Oryoku Maru, around 300 had died. In a period of just over six weeks American submarines had killed over 4,000 Allied POWs.
    On Leyte, the airfield in Tanauan area becomes operational. In the U.S. Sixth Army's XXIV Corps area, the 2d Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, starts eastward along the Talisayan River bank toward the 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 11th Airborne Division. While the 305th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division, takes Cogon and clears that area, the 307th Infantry Regiment pushes toward Valencia, reaching San Jose.
    On Luzon, the USN Third Fleet continues air attacks and in the evening starts eastward to refuel. In three days of continuous patrol, TF 38 aircraft have destroyed an estimated 208 Japanese aircraft on the ground and 72 in the air; U.S. losses are 27 to the Japanese and 38 in operational accidents.
    On Mindoro during this and the next few days, action is limited to patrolling in the beachhead area and organizing defenses about the airfield perimeter. The Japanese continue air attacks on shipping but the USN Seventh Fleet detachments sail for Leyte.
    Major operations of the USAAF Far East Air Forces include B-24 strikes on Padada Airfield on Mindanao Island and Puerto Princesa Airfield on Palawan Island. B-25s, A-20s, and fighter-bombers attack airfields and targets of opportunity in the central Philippine Islands

    1945
     
  19. syscom3

    syscom3 Member

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    1939
    CANADA: The governments of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom sign an agreement to establish the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP). This CDN$1.281 billion (CDN$17.88 billion in year 2005 dollars) program to train pilots, navigators, wireless operators and gunners from the UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Instructors from the Royal Canadian Air Force working at 107 schools and 184 ancillary units across Canada, will eventually train 130,000 Allied aircrew. The Avro Anson is the first training type to be chosen.


    1941

    AUSTRALIA: USAAF Far East Air Force B-17s, evacuating Luzon, Philippine Islands, begin arriving at Batchelor Field near Darwin, Northern Territory.
    A plan is drawn up for using Australia as an Allied supply base under command of Major General George H. Brett, USA.

    EAST INDIES: The Australian "Gull Force" lands on Ambon Island, Netherlands East Indies. This force is comprised of the 2/21st Battalion of the 23rd Brigade, "C" Troop of the 18th Antitank Battery, a section of 2/11th Field Company and various other support units. The force had been transported from Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, to Ambon in three Dutch merchant ships escorted by an Australian light cruiser and corvette.

    HAWAIIAN ISLANDS: In a command shakeup, Admiral Husband E. Kimmel is replaced by Admiral Chester W. Nimitz as Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet; Lieutenant General Walter C. Short, Commanding General Hawaiian Department is replaced by Lieutenant General Delos C. Emmons; and Major General Frederick L. Martin is replaced by Brigadier General Clarence L Tinker as Commanding General, Hawaiian Air Force.
    A Japanese "Glen" seaplane makes its operational debut when the submarine HIJMS I-7 launches the aircraft for a dawn reconnaissance over Pearl Harbor to determine the damage caused by the attack of 7 December.

    HONG KONG: The Japanese control the north side of Hong Kong Harbor, the British Hong Kong Island. After a week of air bombardment, Japanese Lieutenant General SANO Tadayoshi, commanding the 38th Division, sends a captured British civilian woman (and her two dogs) across the harbor to demand surrender from British Governor Sir Mark Young. Sir Mark himself "declines absolutely to enter into negotiations for the surrender of Hong Kong."

    MALAYA: Hard fighting continues on the Grik road. A weak defense detachment is reinforced but falls back under pressure of the superior Japanese forces. The Indian 12th Brigade Group is ordered to Kuala Kangsar. British Lieutenant General Sir Arthur E. Percival, General Officer Commanding Malaya Command, gives the Indian III Corps permission to withdraw to the Perak River line if necessary. The Perak Flotilla is formed to prevent the Japanese from landing on the west coast between Knan and Bernam Rivers.

    MIDWAY ISLANDS: Seventeen SB2U-3 Vindicators of Marine Scout Bombing Squadron Two Hundred Thirty One complete a record 9 hour and 45 minute flight from Hawaii to Midway, bolstering U.S. positions there. The aircraft were led by a plane-guarding PBY-4 Catalina of Patrol Squadron Twenty One (no ships are available to plane-guard the flight) on this longest over-water massed flight by single-engine aircraft. VMSB-231 was the same squadron that was en route to Midway on 7 December aboard the aircraft carrier USS Lexington when reports of the attack on Pearl Harbor forced the carrier to turn back short of her goal.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Japanese submarine HIJMS I-15 surfaces to charge batteries near the Farallon Islands about 29 nautical miles west of San Francisco, California. Seeing the lights of the city, Captain IMAZATO Hiroshi jokes to the crew that it was a good time to visit the famous city of San Francisco.
    Japanese submarine HIJMS I-175 torpedoes and sinks a 3,283 ton unarmed U.S. freighter about 222 nautical miles SSE of Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. The survivors are rescued on 27 and 28 December.
    In the South China Sea, the Japanese destroyer HIJMS Shinonome, part of a convoy of troop transports, heading towards the Malayan Peninsula, is sunk near Seria, 20 miles (32 kilometers) west of Miri, Sarawak, by two bombs from a Dutch three engine Dornier Do-24K flying boat of the Dutch Naval Air Group based on the island of Tarakan. The crew of the Dornier drop three bombs, two making direct hits, the third a near miss. The destroyer blows apart in an enormous explosion causing fires to break out on the vessel. It takes only a few minutes for the destroyer to roll over and sink. There are no survivors; all 229 crewmen are lost.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: The Japanese Legaspi force, advancing northwest on Luzon along Route 1 toward Naga, makes its first contact with Filipino forces near Ragay.


    1942
    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A reconnaissance team lands on Amchitka Island and discovers test holes dug by the Japanese for a possible airfield. The Eleventh Air Force flies a reconnaissance sortie over Attu, Agattu, Kiska, Amchitka and the Semichis Islands. Two attacks by five B-24s, two B-25s and four B-26s,
    the second attack escorted by eight P-38s, take off for Kiska Island. On the first mission, four B-24s, get through and hit the submarine base area, marine railway, buildings, and communication facilities.
    The second mission aborts due to weather. P-38s and B-24s also fly offshore patrol between Vega Point on the southern tip of Kiska and Little Kiska Island.

    BURMA: Continuing drive toward Akyab, the Indian 14th Division seizes Buthidaung without opposition.
    Aircraft of the USAAF Tenth Air Force's China Air Task Force bomb Lashio.

    NEW GUINEA: On the Urbana front in Papua New Guinea, Companies G and E of the U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment make a fruitless and costly attack on the Triangle, which they dub "Bloody Triangle." In this action, Company G loses ten of its 27 effectives. Orders are issued for the capture of Musita Island., between Buna Village and Mission, tomorrow and the Triangle on 19 December to pave the way for an assault on the main objective, Buna Mission. Australian Brigadier George Wootten takes command of the Warren Force and prepares for an attack tomorrow. U.S. M3 "Stuart" tanks of "X" Squadron, Australian 2/6th Armored Regiment, start toward the line of departure at 1800 hours local, the noise of their engines covered by mortar fire.
    In Papua New Guinea, B-26s bomb Buna Mission while U.S. ground forces make fruitless attacks on the Triangle now dubbed "Bloody Triangle."

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Drum mines the Bungo Strait in the Japanese home islands. The Bungo Strait separates Kyushu and Shikoku Islands.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, the 1st and 3d Battalions, 132d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, begin their advance from the Lunga perimeter toward Mt Austen and the Japanese position that will become known as the Gifu .The Mount Austen area overlooks Henderson Field and the Japanese offer bitter resistance. Advance elements of 25th Infantry Division (Regimental Combat Team 35) arrive on the island. USAAF aircraft, especially P-39s, and USMC SBDs, provide support and continue to do so as the offensive progresses from coastal supply points, hitting reinforcements moving through the jungle, and destroying ammunition dumps.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 10 B-24's are dispatched from Nanumea in the Ellice to bomb Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall; 9 are recalled because of weather; 1 bombs the alternate target of Mille Atoll. HQ 41st BG (Medium) transfers from Hickam Field to Tarawa Atoll.

    CHINA: 6 P-40's bomb and strafe barracks near Kunlong. 6 others bomb and strafe targets of opportunity in Hanoi. Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, in another message to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, again calls for financial aid and increased air strength.

    AUSTRALIA: General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific, orders Lieutenant General Walter Krueger, Commanding General U.S. Sixth Army, to prepare plans for the next phase of Operation DEXTERITY, the seizure of Saidor, Northeast New Guinea, as an advanced air and naval base. To perform this task, General Krueger forms Task Force MICHAELMAS under Brigadier General Clarence A. Martin, 32d Infantry Division assistant division commander, consisting of Regimental Combat Team 126, reinforced, 32d Infantry Division. The task force is largely that originally scheduled to invade Gasmata, New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomon , 18 B-25's strike Malai lost is B-25D 41-30661 Six other B-25s join USN dive bombers in pounding the Mutupina Point Area; 5 RNZAF Ventura's hit Poroporo and Tarekekori.

    USN, USMC & RNZAF A 75 aircraft fighter sweep over Rabaul. USN 22 Hellcats, 31 USMC Coursairs and 24 RNZAF P-40s from 16 and 14 Squadrons took off from Ondonga at 5:30am. They flew to Torokina to refuel, then split up into two groups, led by Freeman and Arkwright to Rabaul. Two P-40s aborted on the way to the target due to mechanical failures. The Japanese launch a total of 72 fighters to intercept: 15 from the 201st Kokutai, 32 from 204th Kokutai and 25 from 253rd Kokutai. Three P-40s were lost, and two pilots: P-40 NZ3153 over southern New Ireland and P-40 NZ3175/65. Nine Japanese aircraft were claimed, 5 by RNZAF, 4 by USN. Japanese also claim nine planes shot down.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, Torokina Airfield, located on the western coast of Bougainville on Empress Augusta Bay, is put into use as a staging base for Rabaul (New Britain Island, Bismarck Archipelago) bound fighters.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): On New Britain in the Bismarck Archipelago, P-47's intercept 35-40 aircraft attacking Allied forces on the Arawe peninsula; at least 10 airplanes are claimed shot down; Cape Gloucester and nearby shipping are attacked by B-24's and B-25's. In New Guinea, B-25's bomb the Sio area and P-39's sink 2 barges during a sweep along the Huon Peninsula. The 341st and 342d Fighter Squadrons, 348th Fighter Group, transfer from Port Moresby to Finschhafen with P-47's.

    1944
    UNITED STATES: Admiral Ernest J. King, Chief of Naval Operations, is promoted to the (five star) rank of Fleet Admiral.
    The USAAF 509th Composite Group, the first group to be organized, equipped and trained for atomic warfare, is activated at Wendover Field, Wendover, Utah. Two squadrons are assigned to the group, the 320th Troop Carrier Squadron, also activated today and initially equipped with C-47 Skytrains and later C-54 Skymasters, and the 393d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) equipped with B-29 Superfortresses. The 393d had been activated on 11 March 1944 and has been training in Texas, Nebraska and Wendover.
    Major General Henry C. Pratt, Commanding General Western Defense Command, issues Public Proclamation No. 21, declaring that, effective 2 January 1945, Japanese-American "evacuees" from the West Coast could return to their homes. Some individual exclusions continue under the new policy. On 19 February 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the removal of any or all people from military areas "as deemed necessary or desirable." The military in turn defined the entire West Coast, home to the majority of Americans of Japanese ancestry or citizenship, as a military area. By June 1942, more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans were relocated to remote internment camps built by the military in scattered locations around the country.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): 9 B-24s pound the Camranh Bay area of French Indochina. 5 B-25s bomb a road at Wan Pa-Hsa, Burma while 12 fighter-bombers hit a nearby railroad bridge, damaging it severely.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): In Burma, 8 P-47s support ground forces in the Namhkam sector; 8 more P-47s hit rail targets of opportunity between Kyaikthin to Kinu, then E to the Irrawaddy River and up the river to Tigyaing; 4 hit rivercraft at Tagaung; 50+ fighter-bombers attack storage areas, vehicles, bivouacs, personnel areas, and general targets of opportunity at Pang-hsao, Kyaukme, Manai, Kutkai, Ma-ugon, Hpa-ye, and Man Namman; 12 more strafe targets of opportunity during a Kyaukme-Nampyao railroad sweep. 290 transport sorties are flown. The 493d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 7th BG (Heavy), based at Pandaveswar, India with B-24s, sends a detachment to operate from Luliang, China to transport gasoline to Suichwan, China.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 24 B-24s from Saipan and 26 from Guam pound Iwo Jima. 3 B-24s from Saipan on armed reconnaissance, bomb Woleai and Eauriprik Atolls, Caroline Islands. During the night of 17/18 Dec, B-24s from Saipan and Guam fly 3 single-plane harassment strikes against Iwo Jima.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators and fighter-bombers attack Jesselton Airfield, British North Borneo, and Laha Airfield on Ambon Island, Netherlands East Indies.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: U.S. Seventh Fleet Task Groups 77.3, 78.3, and 77.12 safely reach Leyte Gulf from Mindoro.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte, the 32d Infantry Division progresses slowly south of Limon. In the XXIV Corps area, the 307th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division attacks at 1415 hours local, after artillery and air preparation, toward Valencia and reaches the edge of the airfield. The 306th Infantry Regiment stops for the night 500 yards south of its objective, Cabulihan. The 305th Infantry Regiment gains positions along the Tambuco- Dolores road and clears Tambuco.
    On Mindoro, patrolling and work on defenses continue.
    USAAF Major Richard I. "Dick" Bong shoots down a Japanese "Oscar" fighter over San Jose, Mindoro Island at 1625 hours local. This is his 40th victory and Lieutenant General George Kenney, Commanding General Far East Air Forces, orders him grounded and returned to the U.S. Bong is the most successful U.S. fighter pilot ever.
    On Negros Islands, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24s bomb Bacolod while B-25s hit Silay Airfield and U.S. Marine Corps fighter-bombers in attacking the Cananga area and P-38s destroy several aircraft during sweeps. B-25s bomb Likanan on Mindanao Island while B-24s with P-47 support, hit the airfield on Jolo Island; and fighter-bombers hit positions at Valencia on Mindanao Island.

    1945

     
  20. syscom3

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    1940
    UNITED STATES: The U.S. Army Air Corps activates four air districts to have administrative and operational control of all tactical units (bombardment, pursuit and reconnaissance) in the continental U.S. Prior to this date, all tactical units in the U.S. had been under the control of three wings, the 1st at March Field, Riverside, California; the 2d at Langley Field, Hampton, Virginia; and the 3d at Barksdale Field, Shreveport, Louisiana. The four new air districts , assigned to General Headquarters Air Force, are the Northeast Air District at Mitchel Field, Hempstead, Long Island, New York; Northwest Air District at McChord Field, Tacoma, Washington; Southeast Air District at MacDill Field, Tampa, Florida; and Southwest Air District at March Field, California.

    1941
    CHINA: Following an operational loss of an American Volunteer Group (Flying Tigers) aircraft and the ensuing confrontation between the pilot, Eriksen Shilling, and a group of Chinese, "blood chits" are developed. The first blood chits are printed on silk by Chinese Intelligence and stitched on the back of the American's flight jackets. It shows the flag and promised a reward for assisting the bearer. The message is printed in several languages.

    HONG KONG: During the night of 18/19 December, the Japanese land troops on Hong Kong Island between North Point and the Lei U Mun Channel. The landings are successful despite counterattacks by the undermanned British and Canadian Royal Rifles of against Japanese positions on Sai Wan Hill and Mount Butler. The first wave of Japanese troops land in Hong Kong with artillery fire for cover and the following order from their commander, Lieutenant General SAKAI Takashi, Commander of the 23rd Army, "Take no prisoners." After overrunning a battery of anti-tank guns manned by local volunteers. The Japanese rope together all 20 survivors of the action, and bayonet them to death. The Japanese then storm a Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) dressing station, which offers no resistance. The Japanese shoot and bayonet to death eight Canadians, four Royal Army Medical Corps soldiers, and three St. John's Ambulance men. After seizing the Lei Yu Mun Channel, the Japanese 38th Division storms across Hong Kong Island from east to west, splitting the two British defending brigades. The Japanese quickly take control of key reservoirs, threatening the British and Chinese inhabitants with a slow death by thirst. On 27 August 1946, the Chinese War Crimes Military Tribunal of the Ministry of National Defence in Nanking sentenced SAKAI Takashi. He was executed by firing squad on 30 September 1946. (Jack McKillop)

    MALAYA: The Indian 11th Division completes their withdrawal behind the Krian River and is held in reserve in the Taiping area. Forces defending the Grik road are further reinforced. After visiting forward areas, Lieutenant General Sir Arthur E. Percival draws up plans for a withdrawal behind the Perak River; he also decides to amalgamate certain units, among them the Indian 6th and 15th Brigades (to be designated the Indian 6/15 Brigade) and to incorporate the Indian 12th Brigade Group in the Indian 11th Division.
    The Japanese occupy Penang which was evacuated by the British yesterday.
    All combat-worthy aircraft in Malaya are ordered to fly to Singapore.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: On Luzon, the Japanese Legaspi detachment reaches Naga.
    The French 14,000-ton motor mail vessel Marechal Joffre, manned by a scratch crew that includes aviation personnel from the USN's Patrol Wing Ten, departs Manila Bay for Balikpapan, Borneo, and then to Australia, New Zealand and finally, San Francisco arriving in April 1942. Marechal Joffre will be formally acquired by the Navy and commissioned as the transport USS Rochambeau (AP-63) on 27 April 1942.

    UNITED STATES: Censorship is imposed with the passage of the first American War Powers Act. This act is passed by Congress, authorizing the president to initiate and terminate defense contracts, reconfigure government agencies for wartime priorities, and regulate the freezing of foreign assets. It also permits him to censor all communications coming in and leaving the country. President Franklin D. Roosevelt appoints the executive news director of the Associated Press, Byron Price, as director of censorship. Although invested with the awesome power to restrict and withhold news, Price takes no extreme measures, allowing news outlets and radio stations to self-censor, which they do. Most top secret information, including the construction of the atom bomb, remains just that. The most extreme use of the censorship law seems to have been the restriction of the free flow of "girlie" magazines to servicemen, including Esquire, which the U.S. Post Office considered obscene for its o
    ccasional saucy cartoons and pinups. Esquire takes the Post Office to court, and after three years the Supreme Court ultimately sides with the magazine.
    In another executive order, President Roosevelt directs a commission, to be headed by retired Supreme Court Chief Justice Owen J. Roberts (Roberts Commission), to "ascertain and report the facts relating to the attack made by the Japanese armed forces upon the Territory of Hawaii on 7 December 1941...to provide bases for sound decisions whether any derelictions of duty or errors of judgment on the part of United States Army or Navy personnel contributed to such successes as were achieved by the enemy on the occasion mentioned; and if so, what these derelictions or errors were, and who were responsible therefor." In addition to Justice Roberts, the commission membership includes retired Admiral William H. Standley and Rear Admiral Joseph W. Reeves; Major General Frank R. McCoy, USA (Retired) and Brigadier General Joseph T. McNarney, USA.
    President Roosevelt signs Executive Order No. 8984 that provides that the Commander in Chief U.S. Fleet will take supreme command of the operating forces of all Navy fleets and coastal frontier commands, and be directly responsible to the President.


    1942
    ADMIRALTY ISLANDS: USAAF Fifth Air Force B-24s attack a transport northwest of Lorengau on Manus Island.

    ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A B-24 flies reconnaissance over Kiska, Attu, Agattu and Semichis Islands.

    NEW GUINEA: In Papua New Guinea, the Australian 39th Battalion, 7th Division, which has been joined by elements of the 2/14th Battalion, 21st Brigade, has reduced the Japanese strength at Napapo to about half and is being relieved for action on the Sanananda front by the Australian 2/16th and 2/27th Battalions, 21st Brigade. The Australians, supported by fire of the Americans, begin a concerted attack on the Sanananda front. The Australian 2/7th Calvary Regiment, 7th Division, having moved elements into the roadblock against firm opposition, attacks north along the Soputa-Sanananda trail, bypassing resistance just ahead of the block.
    The Australian 30th Brigade attacks at the track junction, employing two battalions in a frontal assault and another in the region east of the track, but makes little headway. The Urbana Force attempts to clear Musita Island. Elements of Company L, U.S. 127th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, reach the island by means of a cable, but with draw upon meeting heavy resistance.
    On the Warren front, a concerted assault against Cape Endaiadere and New Strip is spearheaded by Australian tanks, which prove invaluable in reducing concrete and steel fortifications. After preliminary air and ground bombardment, the Australian 2/9th Battalion, 18th Brigade, begins an attack on Cape Endaiadere and soon breaks through the main Japanese positions and reaches their objective; then drive west along the coast until halted near Strip Point by a new line of bunkers.
    The 3d Battalion, U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment, mops up and establishes a defensive perimeter in the Duropa Plantation. Americans and Australians attack New Strip from the south and east. While the 1st Battalion, 126th Infantry Regiment, pushes toward the bridge between the strips, elements of the Australian 2/9th Battalion, reinforced during the day by the 1st Battalion, U.S. 128th Infantry Regiment, reduce a strongpoint at the eastern end of New Strip and pursue the Japanese west along the northern edge of the strip toward the bridge.
    The Australians sustain heavy casualties and lose three tanks in the action, which is otherwise highly successful. Advance elements of Australian 2/10th Battalion, 18th Brigade, arrive at the front by sea during night of 18/19 December.
    In Papua New Guinea, Fifth Air Force A-20s hit positions at Kurenada in the Cape Endaiadere area while Allied ground forces launch a concerted assault.
    B-17s attack a convoy in Astrolabe Bay off Madang, while B-24s bomb the Alexishafen area and other B-24s bomb the airfield at Lae and attack the convoy off Madang.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: USN submarine USS Albacore torpedoes and sinks Japanese light cruiser HIJMS Tenryu about 8 nautical miles east of Madang, Northeast New Guinea, in position 05.12S, 145.56E. Albacore survives counterattacks by escorting destroyer (HIJMS Sukukaze or Isonami).

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The 3d Battalion, 132d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division, advances up the northwestern slopes of Mt Austen to Hill 35, where Japanese fire is encountered.

    UNITED STATES: The Joint Chiefs of Staff authorize the occupation of Amchitka Island, Aleutian Islands, less than 100 miles from Japanese held Kiska Island, provided it is suitable for an advanced air base from which Kiska can be attacked.

    1943
    CENTRAL PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Seventh Air Force): 14 B-24's bomb Mille Atoll. The 46th and 72d Fighter Squadrons, 15th Fighter Group, transfer from Canton and Wheeler Field respectively to Makin with P-39's. The 531st Fighter-Bomber Squadron, Seventh Air Force, transfers from Canton to Makin with A-24s.

    CHINA: In China, 27 B-24's, supported by 28 P-40's, pound the airfield at Namsang; some of the P-40's strafe Laihka Airfield; 2 B-25's on a sea sweep claim damaging hits on a freighter and a tanker in the Hainan Straits; 5 B-25's bomb SW part of Nanhsien. Japanese planes attack Kunming in preparation for an offensive against India.
    Chinese Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek gives Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell full command of Chinese troops in India and in the Hukawng Valley of Burma. Stillwell is Commander-in-Chief US China-Burma-India Theater of Operations, Chief of Staff to Chiang Kai-Shek, Commander-in-Chief Northern Area Combat Command and Deputy Commander in Chief South-East Asia Command.

    SOUTH PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Thirteenth Air Force): On Bougainville in the Solomon , 10 B-24's bomb the Kahili supply area, 5 more hit the Bonis supply area, and 19 others hit targets in the Chabai-Porton area; 5 B-25's carry out low-level strike on troop concentrations at Poroporo and 11 bomb Korovo; B-24's, operating individually and in small flights, on armed reconnaissance attack Kahili, Kieta, and Poporang; fighters strafe targets of opportunity at Numa Numa, Cape Pui Pui, and the E coast of Buka.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC THEATER OF OPERATIONS (Fifth Air Force): On New Britain in the Bismarck Archipelago, 70+ B-24's, B-25's, and B-26's bomb Cape Gloucester; 20+ B-25's bomb the Borgen Bay area; and nearly 40 B-24's hit Hoskins Airfield. 33 A-20's bomb and strafe dumps and bivouacs N of Finschhafen.

    JAAF - Four Ki-43 Oscars of the 248th Sentai joined with Ki-43 Oscars of the 59th Sentai and flew a fighter sweep to Arawe , along with Ki-61 Tonys. The U.S. Army Air Force reference history described the combat: “[E]nemy pilots displayed considerable skill and aggressiveness. This was especially true on 18 December when 16 P-38s of the 475th FG, 433rd FS jumped 10 to 15 ZEKES (sic), OSCARS, and TONYS at midday. The P-38s dove through the enemy fighters and were in turn jumped by about 15 fighters, which had been hiding in cumulous clouds. Definitely on the defensive and outmaneuvered, the P-38s destroyed only three of the enemy while losing two P-38s…” The 248th Sentai claimed one P-38 shot down and no losses. The Japanese lost a single Ki-61 Tony fighter. Lost in an aerial collision over Arawe is P-38H "Regina Coeli" 42-66856.

    1944
    UNITED STATES: General Douglas MacArthur, Commander in Chief Southwest Pacific Area, is promoted to the (five star) rank of General of the Army.
    The U.S. Supreme Court rules that the U.S. Army's removal of Japanese-Americans from the West Coast early in 1942 was constitutional at the time it was carried out, but that citizens must be permitted to return to their homes when their loyalty to U.S. is established. The tribunal acted in two cases. It upheld the constitutionality of the removal program by a 6 to 3 decision, and was unanimous in holding that loyal citizens should be released. The ruling came one day after the War Department announced that loyal citizens of Japanese ancestry would be permitted to return to their former homes after 33 months of enforced absence in relocation centers. In a second decision, the court rules that Fred Toyosaburo Korematsu is indeed guilty of remaining in a military area contrary to the exclusion order. This case challenged the constitutionality of the entire exclusion process.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: On Bougainville, "Arty Hill" as it was known, is captured by the Queensland 9th Battalion, 7th Brigade, and is a major Japanese position on the Numa Numa Trail leading across Bougainville.

    CHINA THEATER (Fourteenth Air Force): In China, 33 B-24s bomb barracks and administrative buildings at Hankow; 23 B-25s hit Wuchang; 7 B-25s bomb barracks and damage a bridge at Siaokan Airfield while 6 others pound storage buildings at Kunlong; 149 P-40s and P-51s support the Hankow, Siaokan, and Wuchang raids and claim 42 aircraft downed and destroyed on the ground; 20 P-51s and P-38s follow the B-25 strike on Kunlong with napalm attacks, causing considerable damage; 28 other P-40s and P-51s attack various targets of opportunity around Hochih, Nanning and Mengmao, China; Wanling, Burma; and Sang Song and and Phu Lang Thuong, French Indochina.
    77 B-29 Superfortresses and 200 other aircraft of the U.S. 14th Air Force carry out a raid on Hankow. This industrial town served as a supply base in China.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 21: 94 B-29s, flying out of the Chengtu, China area, are dispatched to drop incendiaries on the docks at Hankow, China in the first mass firebomb attack by B-29s; the strike is made in conjunction with 200 aircraft of the Fourteenth AF; 84 bomb the primary target and 5 others hit alternate targets; they claim 1-3-10 Japanese aircraft.

    INDIA-BURMA THEATER (Tenth Air Force): 17 P-47s destroy bypass bridges at Hinlong, China and Wingkang, Burma. In Burma, 12 B-25s knock out two railroad bridges at Wetlet and damage another at Saye; 11 P-47s hit the airfield at Nawnghkio while 12 others sweep airfields at Anisakan, Hsumhsai, and Nawnghkio; 9 fighter-bombers provide close support to ground forces in Namhkam; 17 P-47s attack personnel and supply areas at Man Ton and Hseing- hkai. 292 transports fly men and supplies to forward bases and battle areas. The 427th Night Fighter Squadron, Tenth AF, based at Myitkyina, Burma with P-61s, sends a detachment to operate from Kunming, China.

    AAFPOA (Seventh Air Force): 6 Guam based B-24s flying armed photo reconnaissance over Moen Airfield, Param Airfield, and Eten Airfield and bomb Dublon; after photographing the airfields on the 3 islands, the B-24s return by way of Woleai and Puluwat Atolls, and Namonuito and photograph all 3. During the night of 18/19 Dec, 4 B-24s from Guam and Saipan fly snooper strikes against Iwo Jima.

    HQ AAF (Twentieth Air Force): Mission 13: 89 B-29s flying out of the Mariana are sent to hit the Mitsubishi aircraft plant at Nagoya, Japan; 63 hit the primary target and 10 bomb last resort targets and targets of opportunity; they claim 5-11-12 enemy aircraft; 4 B-29s are lost.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces fighter-bombers attack targets of opportunity in the Tarakan Island, Borneo, area, strafe seaplane facilities at Sanga Sanga, Borneo, and bomb Haroekoe Airfield on Haroekoe Island off Ambon Island.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The USN's Third Fleet (Admiral William F. Halsey Jr.) encounters a typhoon 220 nautical miles NE of Samar Island, Philippine Islands. The destroyers USS Hull, Monaghan, and Spence are sunk about 281 nautical miles NE of Tacloban, Leyte Island, Philippine Islands, in position 14.57N, 127.58E. Typhoon "Cobra," with 70 foot waves toss the three destroyers about like corks. Water pouring down the funnels cause the ships to turn over 60 degrees and finally capsize and only 92 crewmen of the three destroyers are rescued. Destroyer escort USS Tabberer, which herself sustains storm damage, rescues 41 USS Hull survivors and 14 from USS Spence (remaining men will be rescued on 20 December). Ships that suffer varying degrees of damage include small aircraft carriers USS Cowpens, Monterey, Cabot, and San Jacinto; escort aircraft carriers USS Altamaha, Nehenta Bay, Cape Esperance, and Kwajalein; light cruiser USS Miami; destroyers USS Dewey, Aylwin, Buchanan, Dyson, Hickox, Maddox, and Benham; destroyer escorts USS Melvin R. Nawman, Tabberer, and Waterman; oiler USS Nantahala; and fleet tug USS Jicarilla. In all, 765 men and 146 aircraft are lost. Admiral Halsey is held responsible for the disaster for failing to sail the Third Fleet ships out of the typhoon's path.

    PHILIPPINE ISLANDS: In the U.S. Sixth Army's X Corps area on Leyte Island, the 126th Infantry Regiment, 32d Infantry Division, works slowly forward south of Limon and closes the gap between it and 127th Infantry Regiment. The 12th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division, patrols and prepares to drive on Lonoy and Kananga. In the XXIV Corps area, the 307th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division, takes Valencia and its airstrip without opposition. The 306th Infantry Regiment overtakes the 307th at Valencia and makes patrol contact with the 305th Infantry Regiment. The 305th blocks off the road to Dolores. The southern part of the Ormoc Valley from Ormoc to Valencia is now clear of Japanese.
    On Leyte Island, USAAF Far East Air Forces fighter-bombers destroy a bridge on the Palompon-Cananga road and attack Calatagan Airfield on Cebu Island; B-25s hit San Roque Airfield on Mindanao Island; and fighter-bombers attack Tanao harbor on Panay Island.

    1945

     

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