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Were regular soldiers issued M1 carbines?

Discussion in 'Small Arms and Edged Weapons' started by BCap, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. papabyrd

    papabyrd Member

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    Hand guns were issued to support personal like cooks ,clerks, supply personal,any behind the lines people.Then they found that most of these people had never seen a pistol let alone shot one and could not hit the side of a barn at 10 feet.So the pistols were taken back and carbines put in there place. It is much easier to teach a man to shoot a rifle than a pistol. papabyrd
     
  2. 1ST Chutes

    1ST Chutes Member

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    One of my Uncles was a mortarman with 3/25 he was issued a carbine. Another was a wireman in the 3rd Armor, issued a carbine.
     
  3. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    I have read, but cannot confirm, that the M-1 carbine was a popular war trophy for Germans. Supposedly they liked its lightness and ease of operation.
     
  4. Spartanroller

    Spartanroller Ace

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  5. lordofmacedon

    lordofmacedon Member

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    The carbine was given to artillary men, jeep drivers, and medics to have better protection than a pistol. I read the book pacific and on the cover I saw some men carrying carbines. sadly I'm not sure if it was hollywood that incorrectly viewed it or if regular soilder were actually given carbines. Thier might have been some who looted or traded weopens with others but I can't positivley say that regular soilders were given carbines or not.
     
  6. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    If you look at the archived photos of the first flag raising on Iwo Jima (not the more famous second one), you will see a Marine squatting in the foreground with a Carbine. If you watch beach unloadings with care you will spot a great number of M1 Carbines being represented. This should NOT be surprising since they were the single most produced small arm made in America. Over six million I believe during the war, and they continued in production long after the war was over. I think that Iver Johnson is still producing the Carbine (I could be mis-remembering this).
     
  7. TacticalTank

    TacticalTank Member

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    Well, no one actually knows but, the PACIFIC was actually knida a low budget and the m1 carbine was normally isued to paratroopers due to it being smaller and alot less weight.
     
  8. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    My friend Old Hickory carried two pistols, both taken from German officers. He had use one of them only once and then he did not have fire it to encourage a German civilian to remove himself from the side of the halftrack as they were passing through a town. The man was earnestly trying to tell him something, but Old Hickory was not interested in finding out what it was at the time.

    He carried a carbine, BTW, but originally was issued a Thompson. He liked it so much, he bought himself one when he got home.
     
  9. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    That's incorrect. The Carbine was issued to soldiers and Marines who's primary weapon or responsibility was something that precluded the necessity of the Garand. In "The Pacific" the main charectars were in a weapons platoon; which meant their main weapon was something other than a rifle: Bob Lecky and John Basilone were machine gunners and Eugene Sledge was a Mortarman.

    The M1 Garand was a very large and cumbersome weapon that required a lot of attention and training to employ properly; the M1 Carbine on the other hand was was a relatively simple weapon that was intended to be employed defensively at greater distances than an M1911 or M1928.
     
  10. yan taylor

    yan taylor Member

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    I have heard in post above that men would just swap or pick other weapons up like it was a hardware store, I heard off old soldiers from the British army in WW2 that once you had been issued your Lee Enfield it was your [FONT=&quot]responsibility and it you lost it you were in trouble. going back to American weapons, were dose the Thompson & the M1 Sub-Machine gun (greese gun) come into the infantry company TO&E, could any NCO just pick one up if he didnt want his M1 Rifle or Carbine.
    [/FONT]
     
  11. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I am re-reading this book I read about 10 years ago: It is good, considering reading it. The price is not to bad, either.

    Infantry soldier

    [​IMG]

    Anyway, note the weapon the man bending down in the center has across his back. I tend to think that this group could be infantry, as the man behind the referenced soldier appears to be carrying a BAR.
    Also, on the inside cover, there is an expanded, larger and clearer picture and several of the other men appear to be carrying Garands.

    Edit: In photo section of the book, the picture appears yet again, with caption: "Grim riflemen from the 87th Infantry Division line up for a chilly dinner near the front line."
     
  12. rkline56

    rkline56 USS Oklahoma City CG5

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    Eugene Sledge, "With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa" Mentioned that he always carried a carbine, his fellow mortarmen did the same. To defend their firing pits / foxholes against infiltrators.
     
  13. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    In the case of the Marines carbines outnumbered Garands in their divisions. So, it is pretty obvious in that case that "regular soldiers" in many cases were issued carbines.
     
  14. yan taylor

    yan taylor Member

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    I read somewhere that the Marines had a larger then normal amount of BARs, and because they liked to carry alot of automatics, they use to slit there squads into three with each having a BAR, when they were taking out dug in Japanese they employed a stratergy of adding Engineers armed with flame-throwers, bazookas and satchel charges, so if this is right a marine reinforced squad could have three BARs, one Bazooka, one flame-thrower and a couple of guys with satchel charges, up 17 or 18 men.
     
  15. Dcazz7606

    Dcazz7606 Member

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    I origionally thought that the officers and NCO's were issued pistols to defend themselves from their own troops.
     
  16. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    You're not serious, are you?
     
  17. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    The Marine Corps used four different TO&E's during WWII. They started the war with the D-Series divisional structure, it was similar to the one used by the U.S. Army. Based upon their combat experience, after Guadalcanal a new divisional structure was introduced. The E-Series TO&E followed with a 12 man squad and an additional BAR. This squad allowed for additional command and control and additional firepower. The F-Series TOE came next and went to the 13 man squad of 3 x 4 man fire teams and a squad leader. This squad structure was continued in the G-Series (and is still the squad structure today).

    E-Series rifle squad:
    1.) Squad Leader (Sgt/M1 Rifle)
    2.) Asst. Squad Leader (Cpl/M1 Rifle)
    3.) Auto Rifleman (BAR)
    4.) Asst. Auto Rifleman (M1 Carbine)
    5.) Auto Rifleman (BAR)
    6.) Asst. Auto Rifleman (M1 Carbine)
    7.) Grenadier (1903 Springfield)-Springfield was used because no rifle grenade adapters available for M1.
    8.) Rifleman (M1)
    9.) Rifleman (M1)
    10.) Rifleman (M1)
    11.) Rifleman (M1)
    12.) Rifleman (M1)
    This squad structure was designed to allow for additional command, control and maneuverability. The squad was employed as two equal, 6-man teams, each with a BAR team, the squad leader commanding one the assistant squad leader the other.

    F & G-Series TO&E

    The F-Series introduced the fire team concept, 3 x 4 man fireteams each based upon an automatic rifle. Command and control was further increased because each leader only needed to control three men. The squad leader controlled the three team leaders, the three team leaders controlled the three Marines in their team. It also allowed for greater tactical flexability by adding an additional fire/maneuver element and all elements structured to act as either a base of fire or maneuver element. This squad structure was retained in the G-Series.

    1.) Squad Leader (M1 Carbine)

    2.) Fireteam leader (M1)
    3.) Rifleman (M1 w/M7 grenade launcher)
    4.) Automatic Rifleman (BAR)
    5.) Asst. Automatic Rifleman (M1 Carbine w/M8 grenade launcher)

    6.) Fireteam leader (M1)
    7.) Rifleman (M1 w/M7 grenade launcher)
    8.) Automatic Rifleman (BAR)
    9.) Asst. Automatic Rifleman (M1 Carbine w/M8 grenade launcher)

    10.) Fireteam leader (M1)
    11.) Rifleman (M1 w/M7 grenade launcher)
    12.) Automatic Rifleman (BAR)
    13.) Asst. Automatic Rifleman (M1 Carbine w/M8 grenade launcher)
     
  18. yan taylor

    yan taylor Member

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  19. TacticalTank

    TacticalTank Member

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    From what I know and have learned, a Carbine ( if you didn't know it is pronounced car-been) was not much of a standard issue weapon for troops and maybe even NCO's, I do know that paratroopers would have carbine's instead of Garands because of weight issues with gear and then a big bulky battle rifle with it.

    For the sidearms; I am almost positive that every unit had to buy one of they wanted one. I can recall a previous thread in which someone stated that Patton himself ordered an early model of a .357 round magnum so this convinces me that even CO's had to buy them.
     
  20. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    You're right as much as you are wrong. Paratroopers carried more Garands than they did Carbines. Officer's could purchase their sidearm in some cases; but, most were issued. General Officers could do whatever they wanted.

    Commonwealth officer's could purchase their sidearms either through Government Supply or Private purchase.
     

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