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What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. ULITHI

    ULITHI Ace

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    I just finished “Iron Coffins” and loved it. Need to find some more U boat books. I switched gears and started “The SS: Alibi of a Nation”. So far it’s interesting, but kind of a lot of information crammed in about the history of the Freikorps, which is kind of hard to follow right now for my feeble brain, but hopefully I’ll get the hang of Gerald Reitlinger’s writing style.
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  2. jmaune1419

    jmaune1419 New Member

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    Reading "The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy," by Rick Atkinson currently.
     
  3. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    51jBO-Fa2nL._AC_SY780_.jpg

    Just started this.
     
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  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I finished
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    Escape From Corregidor, Edgar D. Whitcomb, 1958, pub Henry Regnery Company, Library of Congress 58-6754 274pp, a few simple maps.
    The copy of the book I read does not appear to 60+ years old and looks to be less than 10 years old.

    This is the autobiography of Edgar D. Whitcomb, former Governor of Indiana. He was a navigator with the ill-fated 19 Bombardment Group, destroyed on the ground at Clark Field, Philippines on 8 Dec 1941. Subsequently he was relocated to Bataan to support air and ground operations and eventually escaped capture there by taking a boat to Corregidor with several other men, where he was captured when the island fortress surrendered in May 1942.

    Ultimately, he escaped from Corregidor with another captive. As he attempted to make it to Australia with two miners, he was betrayed by Filipinos in a small village. Upon capture, he assumed the made-up persona of a miner and began his odyssey across the globe.

    The book was fairly well written and held my interest. His memory was pretty good and he followed up with the fates of many other soldiers and airmen he spent time with during the war. The maps, while somewhat crude, did help to show the route of his travels in the Philippines.

    Generally I can no longer read books about PoWs of the Japanese, but as this man was a captive for a short period of times, he was not witness to the large number atrocities committed by the Japanese on US military personnel.

    8/10 Well worth reading.
     
  5. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  6. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Bomber Mafia.
     
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  7. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I just finished it

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    The Bomber Mafia, Malcolm Gladwell, pub. by Little, Brown, 2021, 231pp with photos. ISBN 978 0 316 29661 8

    This is a discussion of the schools of though in bombing theory during the 1930s into WWII. It reads a bit like a novel and compares the personalities and motivations of the principal architects of US bombing theory (specifically Heywood Hansel) and the shift to area bombing in 1945 under LeMay.

    It was interesting and quick read. Judging by his comment, the author had access to the thoughts by then current Air Force leadership and conducted research at Maxwell AFB. I kind of felt he touched the top of the story without going deeply into the story.

    7/10 Would recommend as an additional source.
     
  8. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    BTW, the first person I found who envisioned strategic bombing of cities and carpet bombing of armies was a Confederate who envisioned waves of his steam powered, iron framed, oak planked orinthopters operated by a sole "conductor" raining Greek Fire down upon Union cities, armies and navies.

    That predates the Italian Guilo Douhet.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2021
  9. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Friend just dropped off Robert W. Love Jr.'s History of the U.S. Navy. (Both volumes.) I wonder if I'll finish it.
     
  10. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Which one? R. Finley Hunt, Richard Oglesby Davidson, or William C. Powers.

    Don't forget, on the Union side, Edward Serrell, Chief Engineer of the Union Army of the James.

    All were looking into building helicopter bombers. Problem was none could get the steam plant weight down to make steam power practicable.
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Yeah, several tons of coal to keep it going would have been a wee issue.
     
  12. Christian Belena

    Christian Belena New Member

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    Reading

    Marshall, George C., Henry H. Arnold, and Ernest J. King. The War Reports. New York. Walter Millis, ed. New York, NY: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1947.
    Hobbs, Joseph P. Dear General: Eisenhower's Wartime Letters to Marshall. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999 [1971.]

    IMG_1384.jpeg IMG_1385.jpeg

    Christian Belena
    Archivist and WWII Subject Specialist with federal government
    US Navy veteran, 1987-1993
     
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  13. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Not to mention water for the boiler...Steam engines of the time consumed slightly more water than coal(by weight).
     
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  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    And the small chance of a teeny tiny bang from the boiler.

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  15. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Yes weight and size was the biggest problem with an "external combustion engine" at least one that produced any sort of horse power. It was the "internal combustion engine" that made their ideas come to life...The first successful internal combustion engine was created in 1860 - Giving a chance for the helicopter...But it wasn't until 1876 that the engine became widely accepted. Of course an engine wasn't the only problem to solve when inventing a helicopter - Michelangelo also thought up the concept...

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    The Germans also saw the potential in such a craft...It is impressive that Civil war era people were also mulling the idea over.

    .
     
  16. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Davidson the dentist (with no schooling). He envisioned a 1 HP steam powered wing flapping machine.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2021
  17. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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    EA98A98A-188B-4B94-91A0-75D2B41DC088.jpeg View attachment 35722 I have the book “Big Week” on order and should be arriving any day. About the biggest week of attack on the German factories, rails etc. that was ever planned, from the British air fields in World War II. It got very good reviews and I am anxious to read it. I have read a lot on the land battles and the war at sea, but have never read much at all on the history of World War II air war. (It’s about time) Edit 8/25/21:
    Got it now and it’s really good,
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2021
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  18. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    From Port Hudsom to Cedar Creek (Civil War).
     
  19. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I started this last night.
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  20. Christian Belena

    Christian Belena New Member

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    I just received Global Mission by General Arnold ($3.89 purchase from Thrift Books) only to find that it was signed by Hap!
     

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