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What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I've been somewhat out of pocket for the past 2 months, dealing the end-stage illness and subsequent death of my mother, then some other family details that prevented from having the time to write reviews and the occasionally a computer to use to so. I finally had a chance this afternoon to get caught up writing evaluations of 4 WWII-oriented books.

    First on the list:

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    A Proud American The Autobiography of Joes Foss, Joe Foss with Donna Wild Foss, 1992 Pocket Books, 343pp, Photos, Maps, and Index. 0671757350

    As indicated by title and author, this is an autobiography of MoH recipient Joe Foss, Marine pilot and hero of the Guadalcanal Campaign. The book was interesting and held my attention well, as it related his entire life up to 1992 (He died in 2003). I learned a great deal about the man, such as he served as governor of South Carolina and was the first commissioner of the American Football League.

    I was expecting and hoping for a bit of his participation at Guadalcanal. It is not that he didn’t cover it well; I guess just wanting the story to be a bit more of the book than it was and less about his later life.

    All in all, it was a enjoyable read and if you are interested in biographies of well-known personalities of the war, it is worth reading.

    8/10
     
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  2. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Major General Maurice Rose World War II’s Greatest Forgotten Commander, Steven L. Ossad and Don R. Marsh, 2003, Taylor Trade Publishing, 388pp, photos, maps, bibliography, index and end notes. ISBN 9781589793514

    This is an excellent study of MG Maurice Rose that explores his life and death and good detail. A large portion of the book is spent on reconstructing advance on Paderborn and the immediate events leading up the death of this great armor general. There are good maps that will allow the reader to develop a view of what happened.

    The authors go into great detail about his early life and his progress through the ranks to become a leading authority on armored warfare and the book is presented in a very readable format that held my interest well.

    10/10 Excellent addition to my bookcases.
     
  3. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Omaha Beach & Beyond The Long March of Sgt. Bob Slaughter, John Robert Slaughter, 2007 2009, Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc, 288pp, photos, maps & appendices ISBN 9780760337349

    I originally read about Bob Slaughter in The Bedford Boys and when I saw this book for sale, I though it would be a good read. I was not disappointed.

    Sgt. Slaughter was a prewar Guardsman in the prewar 116IR/29ID and assaulted Omaha Beach where he was a witness to the deaths of many of friends. He managed to remain with the 29th across Europe and was wounded several times.

    The manuscript provide a history of the man and D Company of the 116th IR, both during the war and before. I found the book to be a quick read, as the author did not seem to get bogged down in needless details.

    9/10
     
  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    Front Line County, Kent at War, 1939-45, Andrew Rootes, 1980, St Edmundsbury Press Ltd, 208pp, photos, maps, Appendices, Sources, and index ISBN 0709034733

    A ‘biography’ of Kent County prewar through the end of hostilities. I learned a great deal about how the war was imposed upon the civilian populace, in terms of casualties and damage in that county. I knew there were bombings, but had missed on how indiscriminate it was and I did not realize the number of civilians who were killed by cross-channel artillery and the flying bombs and missiles.

    The author discussed the evacuation plans and implementation that by 1942, children largely had returned home. The author also outlined the civil defense plans the preparations made ready to conduct a quasi-underground response to airborne and seaborne landings by the Germans.

    All in all, this was an interesting book, although it seemed to get bogged down in many chapters outlining how many raid each day, how many people were killed, wounded and made homeless, and how many other buildings were destroyed. I understand the people who endured this horror need to have been remembered or honored, but I felt the repetitiveness of it detracted overall from the manuscript.

    8/10
     
  5. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    Part of that could be that he had already told that story back in 1943 in "Joe Foss: Flying Marine". I have a first edition copy, but I believe it's still in print as Amazon has them. I don't think I'd buy the 2020 paperback by P-47 Press; it has the picture of an RAF Officer in front of a Spitfire. How the hell can you screw that up? Bet whoever had the job of approving the cover didn't get their "pronouns" wrong, silly arse, limp d*ick, woke mother-fuggers.
    Anyway, the original book and I'm sure most of the re-prints, are a decent read. They have the benefit of honesty and immediacy, without the benefit/curse of historical retrospect.
     
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  6. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    He did mention the earlier book and I'll have to look for it and see about reading it. That he had written an account of Guadalcanal earlier may be why it seemed he "rushed" through that part of his life.
    Good book overall.
     
  7. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    I have both Joe Foss's book and they were autographed by him. I have his autographed photo too.

    I'm struggling through Bayonets and Blue Flames. He phonetically spells out conversations involving Highlanders and I have to read it aloud in my mind to understand what he's writing.
     
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  8. harolds

    harolds Member

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    "On War" by Carl v. Clausewitz. A slow read with much to think about.
     
  9. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Not military, but enjoyable. Pietr the Latvian, the first Inspector Maigret novel.
     
  10. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I read it some 25 or so years ago.
    It was quite a labor, that I will not repeat again.
     
  11. ColHessler

    ColHessler Member

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    Yes it was.
     
  12. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I just re-read Hornfisher's Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors. It was an extremely satisfying read. Coupled with the finding of the Samuel B. Roberts, it helped put a stamp on the Battle off Samar. A debt of gratitude is owed to all the members of Taffy 3. Halsey and the US Navy don't fare well in the book. Kinkaide also doesn't come off too well, either.
     
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  13. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Beyond the Call by Trimble & Dronfield. It's about an 8th Air Force Captain who smuggles PoWs from Eastern Europe home. Ph*c the Soviets who didn't want them returned.
     
  14. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Just finished William Shirer's Sink the Bismarck. A very disappointing book. I've read several Shirer volumes and found them well written, informative, and deeply researched.His writing was concise but readable. This volume, on the other hand, was almost cartoonish. It felt rushed like he couldn't wait to be done. There was no real bibliography. In all, this was not a good effort.
    On the other hand, I'm almost done Robert Sherrod's book Tarawa. He wrote this book as a participant and observer. You can sense the immediacy of what was going on. His writing, while precise, was almost breathless. He follow the action almost by the hour. I found it informative and readable. in all, a satisfying addition to my collection.
     
  15. The MP

    The MP New Member

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    Just finished Merchant Marine Survivors of World War II: Oral Histories of Cargo Carrying Under Fire by Michael Gillen.
     
  16. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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  17. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    A good and informative book. Filled in many gaps for me.
     
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  18. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    You should read Forgotten Sacrifice by Michael Walling about the Arctic convoys. I'm not sure how these men withstood the conditions.
     
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  19. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Staff Member Patron  

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    Guess it's time to dust off "Once An Eagle" by Anton Meyer". Haven't read many books lately but it's an exceptional inspirational book. Makes you sit back and really question our travels through Life.
    Coming up through the ranks and dealing with external/internal stress and the ramifications that come with it. The ending is disheartening but actually - just as Life, Point On.
    Might just be one of the reasons the Joint Chiefs of Staff have recommended it for several years.
     
  20. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I am little behind on my reading reviews.

    About a month ago, I read:
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    Lady GI, A Woman's War in the South Pacific, Irene J. Brion, 1997, Presidio Press, 168pp, photos, glossary, ISBN 780891 416333

    This was enjoyable book and quick read. It tells the story of a WAC in the SW Pacific, who was originally from the upper Midwest. She performed crypto work, learning her trade at Vint Hill Farm in Virginia. I had not heard of the establishment before, so this book provided me with an opportunity to learn something new.

    The book was well written and the author appears to be a very patriotic woman who served our country well. It is only 168 pages, so she moved quickly through her tale, but still provided good information and background. She described her comrades and duties well and made the book a good read.

    I realize that quite often our male soldiers were not the best of gentlemen around the WACs, WAVES, and other female members of the armed services, but the author did not seem to dwell on that as I have read in other similar books. She talked about it, but apparently understood how to handle the men and made her service as enjoyable as she could.

    8/10 A very good read.
     

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