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What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    I just finished "Red Burning Sky" by Tom Young. This is a fiction book based on Operation Halyard. I read Freeman's "Forgotten 500" some years ago so this book interested me. A decent read, but the end notes are useful and does reference "Forgotten 500". Not too many authors produce books on this rescued mission.

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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2023
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  2. Riter

    Riter Well-Known Member

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    Just started Bill Mauldin's (WW II Joe & Willie cartoon in Stars and Stripes newspaper) auto-biography, The Brass Ring.
     
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  3. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

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    Reading "Fire in the Sky" by Eric M. Bergerud. (NOT the fire in the sky about alien abduction)

    upload_2023-1-29_8-47-16.png

    He explores the technology and tactics, the three-dimensional battlefield, and the leadership, living conditions, medical challenges, and morale of the combatants. The reader will be rewarded with a thorough understanding of how air power functioned in World War II from the level of command to the point of fire in air-to-air combat.

     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Dune by Frank Herbert.
     
  5. tlderks

    tlderks New Member

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    Though my primary interest is the Philippines in World War II, I am going to Normandy in May, so I am reading Normandy '44 by James Holland to brush up on D Day and the fighting directly after.
     
  6. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    I have that book in my TBR pile. Let me know what you think of it. I've read other Holland books, so I'm curious.
     
  7. Riter

    Riter Well-Known Member

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  8. tlderks

    tlderks New Member

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    Lou,

    Glad to meet you. So far nothing new on the facts concerning D-Day in the book, and I do not expect there to be. I read these for the personal stories that this book seems to have in abundance. I am very much a child of The Longest Day/The River and The Gauntlet genre of combat books.
    In fact, that is what I write, with articles published in World War II and Vietnam magazines. Here are links to a couple of my articles concerning the fighting on Luzon: World War II: The U.S. 32nd Infantry Division Battle to Control the Villa Verde Trail and Story: Forgotten Victory, by Tracy Derks, WWII – The Wolfhound Pack. These articles are about the 32nd and 25th in the Northern mountains of Luzon and are sprinkled with personal stories from vets I have interviewed.
    I am now going through those interviews because I have jumped back into my original plan to write a book about the fighting in the mountains through the eyes of the men who were there.
    Tropic Lightning Division, The Red Arrows, The Golden Cross, The Buckeyes, The Sightseeing Sixth, and the Bushmasters. Most of these interviews were done 25 and 26 years ago and I am proud that I was able to capture these stories from American heroes.

    Tracy Derks
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    Tracy,
    Thanks for the reply. I'll be sure to check out your links. I read primarily to expand my knowledge of WW2. My father spent his involvement in Italy and North Africa. For a number of years he would attend reunions with his company. I attended a number of them, but I was just a child then. My interest was only piqued 10-15 years ago, so I didn't have access to interviews. The Battle off Samar and my father's involvement reignited my interest. As a result, my interest is more general. I'm glad that many here are authors with access to sources that are more first hand.

    Good luck with your task. When you're done we'd be happy to read it.
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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  11. Riter

    Riter Well-Known Member

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    Read it decade agos and cited in my research. I've got over five shelves on Colonial or Revolutionary War/War of 1812 era. Check you PM.

    Currently on Dirk Cchervatin's Eastern Front: 500 Letters from War. Author's father served in the 329 Infantry Division in Armee Grupp Nord. He was forced labor in Czechoslovakia post war.
     
  12. Riter

    Riter Well-Known Member

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    Don't expect much from Chervatin's Eastern Front. He was rear echelon so there's not much action, Censorship didn't help. I did pick up a couple interesting points but the most interesting part was the escape from Czechoslovakia into E. Germany and finally into W. Germany.

    Now onto something Napoleonic: Robert Griffith's Riflemen: The History of the 5th Battalion, 60 (Royal American) Regiment, 1797-1818.
     
  13. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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    2BE287CE-ADC2-4E9F-B81C-FA8D361BE40E.jpeg This just arrived today,
     
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  14. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Post a review, please.
     
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  15. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    An excellent read. I think you'll enjoy it.
     
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  16. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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    Ok. I just started it but I will when I am done. I normally read very slowly. That may be quite a while, because unless it is one you just can’t put down, it may be a long time. I just finished one like that. What a beautiful book, was entitled, “A Terrible Glory, Custer and the Little Bighorn”. The Last Great Battle of the American West, by James Donovan.This is the third book I had read on the battle and the best by far. I read different topics, even western novels and the Civil War and the Revolutionary War.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2023
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  17. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    A good fiction read is Stephen Hunter's "Bullet Garden". It's about the bocage fighting in France just after D-Day. I've always enjoyed Hunter's work. This is worth a look.
     
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  18. tlderks

    tlderks New Member

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    I really liked Stephen Ambrose's duel biography of Custer and Crazy Horse, along with The Stand, by Philbrick. I read the one that won the Pulitzer a few years back, but it just seemed like more of the same. I will bump up Donovan's book to nearer the top of my reading list. Still may take years to get to, I am a sloooow reader as well.
     
  19. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    "duel biography" :D
     
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  20. Riter

    Riter Well-Known Member

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    Been reading Soldat. It's the taped recordings of German PoWs in British custody.
     

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