Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

Tags:
  1. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2002
    Messages:
    13,478
    Likes Received:
    1,386
    Location:
    London, England.
    That is a very, very scarce book indeed, Kai ! Took me years to find a copy. A unique memoir of the Eastern Front.
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    22,930
    Likes Received:
    1,122
    Location:
    Kotka,Finland
    Thanx Martin! You do find some rather odd books every now and then at second hand book stores but not many are really worth while.

    This book did change one of my carved-in-stone images of the Barbarossa offensive. I had always thought for some reason that the furthest the Germans got was the tram stop. Like they got there for a second and were pushed back. Nope. The tram stop was there to visit for the troops as the doctor did with his assistant thinking that soon they would be able to take a tram all the way to Kreml...

    :eek:
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    22,930
    Likes Received:
    1,122
    Location:
    Kotka,Finland
    "Moscow Tram Stop" Heinrich Haape 1957 copy:

    A few tricks from the book to keep your MG´s prepared for fight in minus 40 degrees Celsius:

    1. Keep the MG gun in the oven of the enarby house and once the attack starts get the gun. When you shoot with it it keeps itself warm.

    2. Pour some gasoline over the moving parts and set it on fire. After a while the weapon is ready for firing.
     
  4. Greenjacket

    Greenjacket Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2002
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    1
    I've just got my reading lists for the first year of my university course (War Studies and History at King's College London), so I've currently got:

    John Keegan - Face of Battle
    Laurence Freedman (ed.) - War
    Martin van Creveld - The Transformation of War
    Knox and Murray (ed.) - The Dynamics of Military Revolution
    Michael Howard - War in European History

    And a handful of others, but I'm mostly reading those above.

    [ 02. October 2004, 03:29 PM: Message edited by: Greenjacket ]
     
  5. TheRedBaron

    TheRedBaron Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Messages:
    2,122
    Likes Received:
    30
    Same as Wolves Uni list almost!

    I hated Freedman... It was boring...

    Keegans book is ok.

    What modules have you got Greenjacket?

    I only have to teach once next year and thats the trip to Normandy... 6 months to go! Yippee!!!
     
  6. Greenjacket

    Greenjacket Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2002
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm taking units on the Conduct of War, the Experience of War, and two compulsory half units entitled the Art of War Studies (seems to be basically an introductory unit) and Contemporary Security Issues. I'm taking a fourth unit from the History department, Europe 1500-1800.

    As for Keegan, I'm ploughing through it at a fair old lick, it's proving readable and straightforward if not particularly eye-opening.
     
  7. Greenjacket

    Greenjacket Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2002
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    1
    About your trip to Normandy, with any luck the department should be taking a trip to Arnhem some time either this autumn or in the new year, looking forward to it.
     
  8. TheRedBaron

    TheRedBaron Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Messages:
    2,122
    Likes Received:
    30
    Excellent! Would be useful for my Masters on Airborne Effectiveness! Any spare places... Let me know!!!
     
  9. figjam

    figjam Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    im reading "cassino: the hollow victory" by John Ellis, again, while i wait for "arnhem 1944: the airborne battle" by Martin Middlebrook to come (ive ordered it)
     
  10. TheRedBaron

    TheRedBaron Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Messages:
    2,122
    Likes Received:
    30
    Figjam,

    GEt yourself a copy of 'It Never Snows In September' by Robert Kershaw to read along with 'Arnhem 1944'. This gives the German account of Operation Market-Garden. Excellent book.

    RED
     
  11. figjam

    figjam Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2004
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    ok, thanks mate!
     
  12. redcoat

    redcoat Ace

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,521
    Likes Received:
    139
    Reading DRESDEN, Tuesday 13 February 1945, by Frederick Taylor.
    So far a good book. Lots of myths laid to rest, but he doesn't give the Allies a 'free get out of jail card' over the raid either.

    Also re-reading CONVOY, Drama in Arctic Waters by Paul Kemp.
    Interesting book, amongst other things he points out that the Germans lost over twice the amount of men attacking the convoys than the allies suffered
     
  13. Greenjacket

    Greenjacket Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2002
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    1
    I want to get my hands on a copy of 'Dresden' at some point, it's always been an interesting raid.
     
  14. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    6,548
    Likes Received:
    48
    Right now reading 'The Price of Glory' by Alistair Horne. Amazing book!
     
  15. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2002
    Messages:
    13,478
    Likes Received:
    1,386
    Location:
    London, England.
    Yes - it remains probably the best book ever written about Verdun.
     
  16. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    6,548
    Likes Received:
    48
    The author is a warranty of quality. 'To lose a battle' is a supperb book.

    And one thing I love about Alistair Horne is that he is one of the very few war historians who, before becoming a Historian, he studied Literature! Therefore his books are not only a good source, but also a good reading.

    The best example of this combination is Sir Winston Churchill. No Historian will ever match that!
     
  17. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    6,548
    Likes Received:
    48
    Have just come back from a second hand book shop and I have behaved badly…

    Bought some very interesting but 'reddish' stuff:

    "Moscow Dateline" by Henry C. Cassidy, Boston 1943.

    "Commands of the Soviet Army" (Sovetskie komandirii) by I. Bebenko, Moscow 1977.

    "On the State" by V. I. Lenin, Bei-Jing 1975.

    "Fundaments of Leninism" by. I. Stalin, Bei-Jing 1975.

    "Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels" by V. I. Lenin, Bei-Jing 1977.

    "Imperialism, superior phase of Capitalism" by V. I. Lenin, Bei-Jing 1989.

    :rolleyes:
     
  18. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    6,548
    Likes Received:
    48
    Well, not all was so leftie-oriented:

    I got bt merely $3:

    "La Dottrina Fascista" (Fascist doctrine), Libreria del Littorio Roma, 1930.

    Original Fascits propaganda! :eek:
     
  19. FramerT

    FramerT Ace

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2003
    Messages:
    1,570
    Likes Received:
    37
    Geez, Fried changes his 'signature' more than I change my underwear. :eek: Reading ;Waffen-SS Kursk 1943 and Actung Panzer #5 Sturmgeschutz III,Stug IV. Has some good pics! :D
     
  20. silentmidgetassasin

    silentmidgetassasin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Im almost finished with Thomas Taylor's Behind Hitler's Lines and Battles Lost and Won by Hanson Baldwin. I'm also reading Martin Gilbert's The Second World War for the second time, starting D-Day, and in the middle of World War Two Reader.
     

Share This Page