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Why do the jews stand out?

Discussion in 'Concentration, Death Camps and Crimes Against Huma' started by ZeJanIt, Aug 12, 2016.

  1. ZeJanIt

    ZeJanIt Member

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    I personally think the atrocities committed should still find revenge today. German should be given to the Jews at the end of WW2 and the Germans left without a country. left to beg the jews for country imo. anyone that thinks the holocaust is fake or someone right should be schooled. facts are facts, even the x-ss confess, videos, stories, mass graves. all setup to be fake??? for jews to get what??. sorry for the strong thoughts, but that's my opinion.
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Well, nobody helped the true Germans either who were sent to the hangings or guillotine for example listening to the foreign radioes...

    Or killed some 100,000 disabled people to make the Aryan nation in the 1930´s.

    How many of them could have made an army or would have resisted the police because it was the nation´s law they broke if they did.

    They simply accepted their fate. Do you guess why the priests, mayors, political people were killed first. To cut down the resistance. There would be no one to lead the crowd.

    Just a couple of thoughts here.
     
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  3. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    There is no defense for the Holocaust inflicted upon Europe, or that inflicted upon Asia by Japan during the same period, but there were many victims other than the Jewish population of Europe. That being said, justice, to be justice, must be tempered with mercy where it is merited and logic to avoid a equal crime, as well as creating a greater problem that leads only to conditions that can only be resolved by more violence.

    Just how to you evict 50+ million people from a country in the middle of Europe, there were already millions of displaced persons all over Europe as it was and many who would die before reaching 'home'. If done tens of millions more would perish, either by the force used or in one of the fiercest winters that was just months away. Among those who would die would be the truly innocent, children who had no part in the rise of Nazism.

    On a more practical level Germany had to rebuild for the good of all of Europe, victims and victors alike. There were less than 4 million Jews in Europe after WWII, and a total of 11 million world wide, so how could such a small population rapidly rebuild Germany? Many of these comfortably ensconced in countries with little or no destruction from the war, are all of them going to pick up stakes and rush to the new promised land? A promised land that is surrounded by nations who to a greater or lesser extent assisted in the Final Solution? A nation that was ground zero for a possible third world war?

    A generation before the people of Germany were saddled with harsh peace terms and 'responsibility' for a war their leaders started. As Marshal Foch predicted, this only insured another war, a more brutal war. Would Europe have enjoyed some 60 years of relative peace with tens of millions displaced German's?

    I don't think so.
     
  4. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Your question presupposes that they believed that their own lives were more important than their personal beliefs. If they believed that they were being obedient to the one true God, how could they do anything else? Early Christians refused to worship Caesar knowing they would be brutally killed. And, of course, there were some "smart Christians" who agreed to worship Caesar and save their own lives.

    Two things that are very important in understanding history (and other people, for that matter) is 1) being aware of our own beliefs and presuppositions, and 2) trying to understand the thinking and beliefs of others. I do not need to become an Orthodox or Hasidic Jew to understand why they would continue to worship God in the way that they believed was right. However, I do need to be aware when I am interpreting their actions through my own worldview.
     
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  5. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    I don't know how "smart" they were. If they denied their heritage,would they still be Jews? It would be difficult for many not to follow the dictates of their faith. Many refused to bow to the state, and others felt that it couldn't happen to them because they were part of German life. It was their very beliefs that made them different and therefore subject to the whims of the government. Since it had happened before, the Nazis found many who believed what they said.
     
  6. GunSlinger86

    GunSlinger86 Well-Known Member

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    If Judaism and being Jewish is a religion, then how is it they are also an ethnic race as well? Unless the original Jews came from the same part of the near east, and they did a good job of not mingling too much with outsiders?
     
  7. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member

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    That is a constant debate. Is it one who practices their faith, has ethnic ancestral roots or is it the practice of their culture? I read a study focusing on that very question and many people of Jewish descent that I have talked to said it doesn't really matter. Regardless of how they are Jews they are Jewish and celebrate the diversity.
     
  8. ZeJanIt

    ZeJanIt Member

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    Best answer yet, but I am talking about the first part, which is the basis for my whole question. For my kids screw being Christian, Athiest, satanist or Jewish or whatever. I would do what it takes to secure their life, eat dog shit, trash, beg, steal, whatever and keep moving out of the Third Reich. I'd cut my hair, shave, get false papers and move, now granted this is with after knowledge and maybe I'd live in a city where it happened first so it would be impossible to adapt.

    and as we know some Jews did adapt like this and get out, but you'd think later in the war after the death camps were going strong less would have been caught.
     
  9. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    I see your point...but "moving" wasn't as easy as all that...could you just "move" to another country today? Of course not...
    Ive seen programs that show that there was a lot of rumour, little fact, many couldn't leave and hoped for the best, some, those in positions of power and knowledge had a idea of what was coming and made "arrangements" to leave early...most of these had sponsors in other countries and had money and education that allowed them to be accepted...others just left illegally.
     
  10. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member

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    I agree. Many didn't necessarily believe what was happening in other countries and just assumed that the pogroms were just that, rumor. In addition many could not imagine packing up their lives and careers. It was expensive to leave the continent and traveling to neighboring countries was no real difference. Many locations also harbored prejudice towards those of Jewish ancestry so it was difficult to displace.
     
  11. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

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    There were not many places where they could go. As KJ said, it was not easy for most to leave. Even if the did, the locations that were accessible were limited. The most heart-wrenching example is the SS St. Louis. Read about it here https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005267
     

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