Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Winglets

Discussion in 'Air Warfare' started by Blaster, Sep 28, 2007.

  1. Blaster

    Blaster New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    1,687
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    via TanksinWW2
    Every time I've flown a long haul flight I've noticed winglets on my aircraft, be it Airbus A340, B-747, B-767, etc. But the B-747D version is a short range model of the 747 that lacks winglets. Do winglets on commercial aircraft somehow make them capable of long haul flights? If so, why?
     
  2. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    11,708
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Luton, UK
    via TanksinWW2
    Winglets have the effect of greatly reducing drag, which allows for greater fuel economy, which does aid long-haul flights. However I am suprised that any civilian aircraft do not have them - fuel economy is a good thing even in short-haul flights.
     
  3. Oli

    Oli New Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2005
    Messages:
    1,569
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Scunthorpe, UK
    via TanksinWW2
    Winglets (Whitcomb* winglets) have the effect of making the span effectively infinite - yes it seems silly that putting a definite "end" on a wing makes it act as if if it were longer.
    The way it does this is that the winglet prevents high pressure air flowing round the wing tip into the low-pressure zone above the wing, this increases lift by reducing losses and also reduces drag.

    http://oea.larc.nasa.gov/PAIS/Concept2R ... glets.html


    * Named after Richard Whitcomb, the guy who also came up with area-ruling for supersonic aircraft.
    Just found out that Lanchester also made this discovery...
     
  4. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago
    via TanksinWW2
    The 747 you are speaking of (I've heard of the 747-300,but not a D version,where did you come across this info) isn't so much short range as it is high capacity.It's used to move a lot of passengers over distances that are too short (also I believe,not enough altitude) for winglets to be effective.BTW,this version of the 747 is illegal to use in the U.S.
     
  5. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago
    via TanksinWW2
    Ooops!I'm a bit rusty on my commercial aircraft.The plane we are referring to is the 747-400 D.The D stands for domestic.The -400D is widely used in Japan.Other than that I'm not sure.
     

Share This Page