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ww2 .303 ammo safe???

Discussion in 'Weapons' started by Hinzor, Oct 21, 2009.

  1. Hinzor

    Hinzor Member

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    hi everyone,

    I recently came across some ww2 clips with .303 ammo in it.
    Is it safe to display this and have it in your room?? because ive got a exhibition case where i have 2 ww2 pouches some clips and the ammo laying in it, is this safe?????


    these are pictures of it with the clips and pouches
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    i hope someone can answer my question;)


    Cheers,

    Hinzor
     
  2. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    So long as the shell casing is free of corrosion and the round is intact and in good condition you can fire them. I will warn you that you likely will get alot of misfires from ammunition that old. I fired some .303, 8mm Spanish Mauser and 7.7 Japanese that is old or from WW 2 myself. I got like one in three or four rounds to fire.

    If the round misfires that is, doesn't go off then wait several seconds and slowly remove the round from the gun keeping it pointed in a safe direction. If you have a partial misfire, that is the round goes off but with little recoil inspect the barrel and chamber before firing another round to ensure both are clear.

    Also, expect really bad accuracy from the rounds as the powder will not give even performance because of its age.

    I hope that answers your question.

    For display treat the rounds as live ammunition. Keep them away from heat etc., just as you would with new ammunition. Otherwise they are prefectly safe for display.
     
  3. fischer

    fischer Member

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    For Display this stuff would be fine and as stated keep it away from heat and flame.

    For shooting purposes??? You are taking a chance. This WW2 vintage ammo is corrosive and will rust the bore, bolt, etc. and pretty much ruin the rifle if not cleaned properly. The examples you show here look pretty beat up.

    Corrosive ammo has Mercury (Mercuric type salts) in the primers to extend the shelf life of the ammunition. If you do fire this stuff you must clean the rifle right away. You cannot use products like Hoppes as this will not remove all of it and your bore will rust and pit.

    I would scrub it down with something like Windex that has ammonia in it. It should remove most of the fouling. Rinse and follow with oil.

    .303 ammo is everywhere IMO, why shoot this stuff?

    BR, fischer
     
  4. ozjohn39

    ozjohn39 Member

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    From the look of some of them I would take them out the back yard and bury them - deep.



    John.
     
  5. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    If all you want to do is display them as a set, then get yourself a inertia bullet puller, remove the projectile and powder, reseat the bullet in the case and display them. For a look at one of the tools, Goto:

    86846 - Inertia Bullet Puller, Easy to Use, Removes Bullets up to .45 Caliber

    You might even be able to "rent" one from a local gunsmith or just have him render the rounds inoperable for display. They are really easy to use, just fit the base into the proper sized colllet, and strike the other end on a hard surface. The primer points up, and is in no danger of firing. The bullet pops out, and the powder and projectile are caught in the recepticle.

     
  6. luketdrifter

    luketdrifter Ace

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    A gunsmith will do it, usually for little or no charge. I'd just assume throw them in a bonfire before putting them in a firearm, that'd be wreckless not only for your safety but the gun. I've seen people do great damage to really nice firearms by trying to shoot crappy ammunition. Probably would do you no harm to display as is, buy why take the chance?
     
  7. sirplus

    sirplus recruit

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    I had some 1900 dated 303's that I dared to shoot BUT the ammo was unbelievable! Eventhough it fired "click - bang" I was picking off clay pigeons at 100 yards wit hthis stuff!
     
  8. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    You need to be far more careful with ammunition that old. If it is black powder that's okay. But, if it is nitrocellouse it can be very erratic and even dangerous to use. It is also much more corrosive to the gun. You need to clean it using a cleaner that will pH out the nitric acid residues present otherwise you get rust and corrosion.
     
  9. luketdrifter

    luketdrifter Ace

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    I have passed on a few older WWII guns because of improper care. I looked at an M1 at a gunshow a few months back...first alarm was the guy only wanted 500 dollars for it. Uh oh. Outside the gun was cosmetically sound. Inside. Oh sweet mary. The rifling was pitted, almost nonexistant. It was ugly. Looked like someone fired off five or six hundred rounds and put it in a case and never cleaned it.
     
  10. DDucz

    DDucz Member

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    Display them yes, fire them NO those look in horrible shape, there could be a weak spot in the brass...not a good idea
     
  11. will382

    will382 Member

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    I personally wouldn't want any live ammunition in my room! It's not worth the risk.
     
  12. DDucz

    DDucz Member

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    There is really no risk involved, just don't set them on fire i guess;)
     
  13. BarrowWight

    BarrowWight recruit

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    I,ve just found what I beleive to be a WW2 .303 round buried in my back garden. A friend of mine (a member of a fifle club) removed the bullet and the cordite and I believed this round to be safe. When I showed the parts to another friend (ex army) he reckoned that the bullet may be a tracer bullet as there were signs of a white substance on the end of the bullet and possible remains of red paint on the tip. How safe is this bullet as it may contain phosphoros?
     
  14. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    I doubt that it has phosphorus in it. The white stuff is likely just lead oxide from corrosion of the lead bullet itself.
     
  15. 101trooper

    101trooper Member

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    fine for display but i myself wouldn`t fire them because of the risk of damaging your rifle or yourself.
     
  16. Chef des Todes

    Chef des Todes Flight Medic

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    Never fire it! Learned that the hard way, trust me XD. Thought do keep those bullets, and the belt in a case. Careful not to touch them without whiping them cause the salt in your fingers will increase the damage over time=rust. I myself have some bullets, and if you ever want I can show you certain designs and ways to set it up. If I were you I'd get a strong wooden frame, with a .5 to 1 inch strong glass sheet. *I don't trust anyone sadly* Just becareful, and enjoy them, for 66 years they look great!
     
  17. Pierre

    Pierre Member

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    ammo is always safe ,if kept in good condition,I shot boxes, and boxes off original ww 2 steyr ammo, the ammo shown here are frankensteins ,NEVER to be used ,I fired original 45-70 and 32 smith&wesson,not one dud ,always clean your gun ,old ammo can be very corosive....... my opinon is that it's WO1 ammo
     

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