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WWI Service Revolver

Discussion in 'Weapons' started by GregA, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. GregA

    GregA Member

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    Visiting a family friend a few days ago, and the conversation moved to her father in law, and how she still had his WWI revolver. She was more then happy to bring it out and show it. I'm not a gun expert, but still looks to be in decent shape.

    [​IMG]

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    I understand the serial number of sorts on the left, but does anyone know what the '30' and the symbol means on the right?
    [​IMG]

    Stamped with his name, and "CMGC", or the Canadian Machine Gunners Corps.
    [​IMG]
     
    sniper1946 likes this.
  2. Gebirgsjaeger

    Gebirgsjaeger Ace

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    That is a great piece! If you want to look for more informations, i can ask at another Forum if you want. They are really knoledgable on guns.
     
    GregA likes this.
  3. GregA

    GregA Member

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    That would be awesome. Any more information I can go back to her with is great. Thanks!
     
  4. Gebirgsjaeger

    Gebirgsjaeger Ace

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    The request is started. Give you the informations as soon as i got them.
     
  5. Gebirgsjaeger

    Gebirgsjaeger Ace

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  6. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    They have taken great care of that pistol.
     
  7. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    I would write Smith & Wesson and get the full detail.
    Firearm History Request - Smith & Wesson

    as it sits the pistol was manufactured 1915-16 and was either bought privately or through military warrant depending on availability. There were approximately 15000 of these pistols produced for Great Britain and Canada during the first world war. The crown and 30 stamp on the butt are the Canadian acceptance marks which indicate that it was shipped to Canada by the distributor and then sold to the individual through military warrant after inspection. Pistols that come from GB to Canada are often stamped with 'll' or the 'Broad Arrow' ^ mark.
     
  8. luketdrifter

    luketdrifter Ace

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    Wow that is a great looking pistol...very nice. Thanks for posting pictures.
     
  9. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Very nice. Thanks for posting.
     
  10. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Thats an awsome piece. This is the first time I have ever seen an actual "named" weapon that is more modern. Ive seen named Flint and Firelocks before.
     
  11. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    That is a beautiful Smith & Wesson. Many thanks for posting the pics.....
     
  12. Gebirgsjaeger

    Gebirgsjaeger Ace

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    GregA,

    the answer that i got at the other Forum is more or less the same that formerjughead has given. His advice to research at this link is very good. Take care of this great piece!
     
  13. GregA

    GregA Member

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    Thank you everyone for their help. I will for sure be getting the history from S&W. Just adds to it for sure. The stuff you guys know amazes me.
     
  14. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    It's all about pluggin' the right stuff in to Google. It certainly is one heck of a piece. There were a couple of groupings on 'gunbroker.com' of similar pistols that included information on the person the specific pistol belonged to. Google: '.455 Smith & Wesson'

    The .455 is a very unique round and the Smith & Wesson revolver is pretty rare in that caliber. Colt manufactured some 1911's chambered in that caliber in the interwar years; but, I think there are quite a few more Colts out there.

    Be sure and keep us posted on what shakes out.

    Brad
     
  15. sniper1946

    sniper1946 Expert

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    Agree with previous comments, a real beauty ...as stated, any further info would be good to see..
     
  16. Richie B

    Richie B Member

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    That is a Smith & Wesson Hand Ejector 2nd Model - the 1st Model had an ejector rod shroud.

    The 2nd Model was introduced in 1915 and made up to 1917.

    A total of 59150 (British service) and 14500 (Canadian service) were manufactured. The highest recorded serial number is 74755.

    Quite a few were converted to .45 Colt after the war so original .455s are quite rare I believe.

    Fine looking pistol.

    Regards

    Richie
     
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  17. Gebirgsjaeger

    Gebirgsjaeger Ace

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    HereĀ“s another comment i recived at my other Forum:

    The revolver is a 2nd model Smith and Wesson New Century. Many of these were converted to 45LC when they were surplussed in North America.

    It's nice to see one in original condition.

    The second model is different from the first in that it isn't of the triple lock design. It was changed to bring down costs and make it easier to produce. I think it dropped manufacturing costs by 10%. If memory serves, the revolvers sold for around $20US to both Canada and the UK. British[​IMG] and Canadian[​IMG] officers had to purchase their own firearms during WWI. That allowed them some leeway as to what they carried. Not really sure what the guidelines were if any. Winston Churchill, carried his own personal pistol during the Boer War, it was a C96, 7.63 mauser.
     
  18. GregA

    GregA Member

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    History request sent, now we wait! Hope they can find some neat history on it.
     
  19. GregA

    GregA Member

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    That took some time, but I got the letter back!

    [​IMG]
     
  20. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Good job. It's always nice to have a follow-up to a request.
     

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