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zimmerit tools and putty

Discussion in 'Modelling' started by panzer808, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. panzer808

    panzer808 Member

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    hi guys just wondering if anyone has any good advice and putty recommendations. i was reading the May 2002 FineScale Modeler magazine and they recommended Zimm-it-rite epoxy putty, but that is no longer available.
    and for making the designs in the putty, any good advice how to do it would be nice. especially the waffle pattern used on some of the stug III. ok thanks.
     
  2. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    I always chicken out when it comes to Zimmerit and hunt for a picture of the vehicle in plain order. So I'd be interested in some suggestions too.

    Cheers,
    Adam.
     
  3. machine shop tom

    machine shop tom Member

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    I just looked a (didn't buy) a Tamiya Panther Ausf A that had photo-etch Zimmerit pieces (by Eduard). Looked very nice but I have too many projects going for now.

    Or I may go on Towerhobbies tonight and order it.

    tom
     
  4. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    It depends on the pattern. But, the easiest way to get the "look" is use a piece of hacksaw blade preferably the 24 or 32 tooth per inch versions. Experiment a bit. A bit of hacksaw blade emulates a notch trowel very well.
    I typically smear on a coat of "hobby putty" or bondo on the portions of the vehicle to be covered using a putty knife and then use the hack saw blade to score it depending on final pattern to be achieved.
    A "waffle pattern" can be done using 18 tooth hacksaw blade, a #10 x-acto blade (alot of work), or a dental tool with a short flat blade (less work than the x-acto blade but the tool is about $20 if you have to buy one outright).
    Brazing and other machine shop skills come in handy in making up tools from hacksaw blades for this purpose.
     
  5. FalkeEins

    FalkeEins Member

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    ..Games Workshop Greenstuff works well...check out this small tutorial on Armorama/Aeroscale

    AeroScale :: Zimmerit
     

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