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Anyone own and operate WWII weapons today? Share thoughts and experiences.


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#1 3ball44

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 11:58 PM

Do you like to shoot your Garand at 1,000 yards?
Do you hunt with a Mauser or Nagant?
Is a Thompson your home-defence weapon?
Is an M1 Carbine your varmit rifle?
How do they perform and what do you use them for?
Weapons are cool.

#2 zippo

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 05:51 AM

Do you like to shoot your Garand at 1,000 yards?
Do you hunt with a Mauser or Nagant?
Is a Thompson your home-defence weapon?
Is an M1 Carbine your varmit rifle?
How do they perform and what do you use them for?

i have an 1888 commision rifle that is the precursor for the mauser. My dad took his first deer with it. I enjoy shootin it, but its about to become a wall hanger, just too old. I have taken a deer with a kar 98 and i disagree on the .30 as a varmit round. I want a k31 swiss but havent got one yet.
""The object of war is not to die for your country, but to make the other bastard die for his." George Patton" George S. Patton

#3 FramerT

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 12:51 PM

I have a .32 Colt automatic. My brother has the .45 Colt auto. I shot mine when I first got it[they were our grandfathers] but not in a long time now.

#4 3ball44

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 05:22 PM

I don't like the Carbine for much of anything, I just know that they are a handy little gun and some people, like on the ranches of Western USA, like to carry them as a multi-purpose weapon. I could think of many weapons I would prefer over the M1 as a varmit caliber, but you could get the M1 Carbine for cheap for many years, and as a gun that gets a little beat up "around the farm" and is light to carry, for some it is just the ticket.

I don't live in the "rifle zone" of Michigan, so I have to deer hunt with shotguns at my place, but I do have a deer camp in the rifle zone, and I would one day like to take a deer with a 98 Mauser. It would be a great caliber, but I am not crazy about the sights.
Weapons are cool.

#5 Slipdigit

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Posted 09 July 2007 - 06:56 PM

I have an Arisaka Type 99 rilfe, with a hooked quillon bayonet, that my grandfather brought back from the war. It has not been fired in years and I don't plan on firing it any-I don't even have ammunition for it anymore. It was made late in the war and was not top quality when built.

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#6 T. A. Gardner

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 05:45 PM

Let's see: I own an SMLE and have fired the Japanese type 99, the Carcano 6.5mm carbine, .45 M1911, .50 Browing (those two with the military), Mosin Naguit rifle, M1 Garand and M1 Carbine, and I'm probably forgetting a bunch of other stuff.
Of these: The M1 carbine is better than a pistol. Not much use otherwise. The Type 99 is a dog. It is long, awkward and has a horribly stiff bolt and a safety that is damn near impossible to operate. The Carcano is handy but like the M1 only better than a pistol. The .50 is neat to fire but, you really cannot get the true measure of it on a range. Pistols are pistols and I really don't get into shooting those as much.
On the whole, I find using older black powder weapons alot more fun. You have to really work to get good with them.

#7 Slipdigit

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 05:48 PM

The Type 99 is a dog. It is long, awkward and has a horribly stiff bolt and a safety that is damn near impossible to operate.


Dog is an understatement. I can understand why they lost the war.;)
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#8 Von Poop

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 08:00 PM

On the whole, I find using older black powder weapons alot more fun. You have to really work to get good with them.


Sorry for digressing enormously but unusually, rather than simply turning green with envy while reading Americans chatting about their guns, T.A.'s actually mentioned something I have had experience with. :D
Rabbiting at night with 15th, 16th & 17th century military and fouling pieces is an absolute hoot, the damn things react to the flash as the match or flint hits the pan and it then seems like an age until the shot leaves the barrel, by which time the Rabbit or Hare is long gone. Best I've usually bagged is field mushrooms caught in the blast area. Challenging indeed.
All far from WW2 stuff though, the early modern period was definitely a 'weight of shot' time for military guns, though some of the extremely long fouling pieces were used for sniping during sieges; one remarkable and famous shot was taken from the spire of Lichfield cathedral to the eye of the Parliamentary commander Lord Brooke, the plaque marking where he fell is a very long way from the spire.

Got a longstanding fascination with punt-guns too but I suspect their legality would be questionable here these days, wonder if anyone still uses them in the states?

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Adam.
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#9 3ball44

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 02:15 AM

Gun laws are best in the US in states like Kentucky, and Wyoming,(and some other western states) where owning a machine gun is no big deal. Myself, having been pampered by scopes and nice open sights, have often found firing military weapons accuratelly harder than expected. I was just curious if others found the old military weaponry useful for things other than collectability and sport. Or perhaps used them in more practical ways, such as hunting.
I have always thought that a small submachine gun would be a fearsome home defense weapon. Our country was founded by rebels with guns, and I think all the gun control now-a-days is not only a shame, but unconstitutional. So just because our ever control hungry government makes laws restricting many "assualt" type weapons, this doesn't mean that some patriotic "rebels" of today don't have them.:cool:

Sidenote-
Although I do not use blackpowder, rabbit hunting with a muzzleloading type weapon is quite a challenge. I find it difficult enough with my muzzleoader, and I use caps and 60 gr. pyrodex pellets. It does serve for quicker reloading, and I do still use roundballs.
Weapons are cool.

#10 lwd

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 10:28 PM

My dad used to hunt with a G41-M it's in a museum now (on loan).

#11 3ball44

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 05:44 PM

I guess some people have come to the conclusion that I have:

Sure it would be nice to hunt/etc. with these vintage weapons, but they don't stand up to moisture as well, and it is difficult to mount scopes on many of them, and that is a necessity for many. So you restrict yourself in range, so you have the power to reach out several hundred yards, but don't have the sighting capabilities to do it. It might be nice to take a deer or two with a Garand or something, but you don't really want it to be your main deer rifle.
Weapons are cool.

#12 mac762

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 12:44 AM

I had a Walter-AC P-38 that was an absolute joy to carry and shoot. Very accurate and reliable. I used it as a self defense house type gun. It saved my butt once but I won't get into that.
I also had my Grandpa's .45 that he was issed as part of the Army Air Force in WWII. I fired the crusty old rounds that were marked 43' on the headstamp that were loaded in the magazine since 45' or so (this was in 98' or so). Worked without a hitch and was accurate. This was a Colt with a flat blue and a flat mainspring housting. It was a very early model but it had plastic grips. I have since given it to my Uncle as he is the oldest son. I miss it terribly.
Also a French MAB that was built in occupied France. I didn't shoot it too much. I had a Nazi marked .32 that I think was Italian but it was stolen from me soon after I bought it. I could hit a baby food jar a good distance with the first shot out of this one. I loved that gun and I'm embarrassed that I can't remeber the exact model number.
I had a Carbine that I loved to shoot but it would jam on me a lot. I think it was due to bad magazines though. I loved the heft of the gun and I can see why guys would like to have it more than the big ole' Garand.
The gun that I most used that was in the right era was my old Model 10-R Remington. It had Flaming bombs and US's all over it. I think it was actually a WWI gun but I'll talk about it anyhow. That was a great shotgun with a sweet action. I took several quail and doves with it. Long shotguns are vastly overrated. If you're quick a shorter barrel is better. I love that gun.
I had a Jungle carbine Enfield, it had a scope on it. I bought it from a guy with a big scope cut on his eye. I gave him some crap about the cut, as he was a friend. I went and shot it keeping my eye well away from the scope. I still walked away with a bruised eye and a bruised ego. Dang that thing could kick. I know my friend used it to great effect on a coyote. Stoped him right where he was hit. I like the .303 except for paying for the shells. :) I also owned a couple of the Enfields with the wood all the way to the end of the barrel. I forget the model number. These shot very smooth and easy.
I had a Thompson for a very short time and I found it's accuracy to be lacking. I much prefered the Sten that I aquired a little later on. I had none of the problems I hear of jamming. It was a good gun and very controlable. It was I believe a Mark IV, it had the wood stock. We shot up a road kill posum pretty good with it. I got rid of both of these guns very quickly after because of the hassle of owning full autos.
I don't have any of these guns anymore but I sure miss them.
Sorry my first post was so long winded.

PS One of my Friends inherited a Ithica shotgun with the bayonette mount on it recently. I hope to get some pictures of this one. I think his Grandpa used it in the Pacific.
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#13 jacobtowne

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 06:19 PM

"Anyone own and operate WWII weapons today?"

Sure. I have some military handguns, a few from each of the two world wars. I have fired most, if not all of them, at one time or another. I no longer shoot the more valuable of them now, as parts for some are scarce and expensive, and, in some cases, virtually non-existent.

The only game I can think of to hunt here in Massachusetts with a military rifle is black bear. Since I don't hunt bear, the Gewehr 98, M1903A1 Springfield, and Lee-Enfield are exercised occasionally at the range.

Using a military handgun to hunt bear is out of the question, since the handgun black bear season here is limited to revolvers cal. .357 Magnum or larger. Also, most military sidearms do not have adjustable sights.

A friend of mine owns several M1 Garands, an M1 carbine, and a M1917 Enfield that we also use for target shooting.

A few sportsmen's clubs hold annual machine gun shoots where you can try out the merchandise, but I've never been to one (yet).

JT

#14 Erich

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 10:08 PM

I still fire my K98 at times, not much with my Beholla or P-38 anymore, it's time to put those 60 year old plus pieces to bed and not try and press them for stoppages or backfires

can't seem to find a spare Rocket for my Panzerschreck 54 dang it all ! :cool:

#15 jagdpanther44

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 11:01 PM

I own a number of weapons, including a mk3 Sten, Thompson and a Mosin Nagant Carbine. Sadly all are deactivated to UK spec.

However, i have fired my friends live scoped K98 rifle (as mentioned in a previous thread) at our local military firing range. It was an awesome experience, the gun was very comfortable to handle and had a kick like a mule.

I would like an M1 Garand, but the price of a deactivated one here in the UK is in the region of £700 plus (old spec deactivation).

How much can a Garand, deactivated or live, be bought for in the U.S. ?
Regards
John

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#16 mac762

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 07:22 AM

We have something here called the Civilian Marksmanship Program where you can buy Garands from the government. There's some requirements but I'm not real sure what they are. You can buy Carbines from them too. If you went this route they start at around $500 US- $1000 for the better ones. M1-Ds start at around $1500.
I've seen them at gun shows and stuff for as low as $350. The last one I saw in a pawn shop was around $500. It was in nice shape too.
A few years back my friend that owned a pawn shop offered me his 30 Carbine with original paratroop stock for $500. I think it was a Rock ola or an IBM?

Anyone here own a broomhandle Mauser? I've always wanted to shoot one of those. I almost bought one several years back when they were importing them from China. I got to hold one of those Chinese broomhandles that was chambered for .45 ACP but I think it was something like $1500. Too rich for me. :)

PS These are all live. How much can you guys over in the UK get a dewat Sten for? Are they pretty reasonable. You can buy the parts kit to build your own dummy gun for under like $50 here. I think I've seen them for less. Then the dummy tube is about the same or less.

#17 jacobtowne

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 03:27 PM

I would like an M1 Garand, but the price of a deactivated one here in the UK is in the region of £700 plus (old spec deactivation).

How much can a Garand, deactivated or live, be bought for in the U.S. ?


You might be hard put to locate a deactivated Garand in the U.S., but perhaps there are some out there.

Here's a link to the CMP.

CMP Home

This will provide an idea for prices.

Several years ago I bought a M1903A1 from the CMP for (I think) four hundred. It's a Springfield Armory, 1935. I also bought 2,000 rounds of really nice LC 1960s ammunition.

The Army gives surplus or obsolete ammo and rifles to CMP for sale to civilians, as I understand it.

JT

#18 jagdpanther44

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:43 PM

Thank you for the link jacobtowne.

How much can you guys over in the UK get a dewat Sten for? Are they pretty reasonable. You can buy the parts kit to build your own dummy gun for under like $50 here. I think I've seen them for less. Then the dummy tube is about the same or less.


A Mk3 Sten with new spec deactivation can be bought for around £135.

Online Shop

Mk2s are a little more difficult to track down...:(
Regards
John

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#19 Martin Bull

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 06:54 PM

Sadly, prices for deact Garands went sky-high due to demand from re-enactors post-'SPR' and have never come down again.....:(
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#20 C.Evans

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 10:11 PM

I used to have a few .303 British and Austrailian Lee-Enfields, MI Garand ""Tanker"" Mosin Nagant, Mauser 98K (WWII) >Remington Rand Colt .45 that had belonged to 2 Star General Francis P. Hardaway (served under MacArthur as an Artillery General) P-08 ""Black Widow"" Lugar, four various Walther P-38's two were BYF's and the others were AC's. Mauser 98 Sniper Variant (made in 1935 w/ 1936 stamped ((and is correct)) 25 round Ansteckmagazin) AC-43 Walther P-38, and 1898 Krag Carbine (not sure if it was a Phillippine Contract Rifle or not?)

Of the above, I only fired the ""Black Widow"" Luger, all of the Walther's I owned, the ""Tanker"" Garand, and the first Mauser 98 K that I had bought.

I found out that the Luger fired a bit upward and to the right, and was not as accurate as most of my Walthers. The ""Tanker"" Garand I had fired like a dream and was very accurate. The Mauser-though was a bit abused during it's lifetime, was still very accurate and sweet to fire. I would like to fire my Krag, but can't get ammo anywhere in my area.

My 1935 built Mauser, has had EXACTLY 50 rounds fired (none by me - unfortunately) through it since it was built. This rifle has had EXACTLY four owners. The first owner, was the Curator of the Mauser Museum in WWII, then a G.I. "Liberated" said rifle and kept it for 40 years. In 1985, this rifle was sold to a Mauser dealer in Houston, Texas, and then in 1997, was finally sold to me :-D

Needless to say, i'd love to fire this rifle but, as a collector-I can't make myself do so.
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#21 mac762

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 12:22 AM

Can you please post a picture of the rifle with the 25 round mag? What are you waiting for man? There is not gonna be a whole lot of difference between a rifle that fired 50 rounds and 100. Except maybe bragging rites. Go for it man, it'll feel good.
I did a lot of plinking with my Grandfather's Colt, I don't regret a single round. It was a WWI dated gun reissued in WWII with plastic grips. I wish I would have shot it more before I gave it to my Uncle, (eldest son). He doesn't even shoot it. He'd have a cow if he saw how many rounds I put through it. That's what these guns were made for. After you wear them out then hang em' on a wall.
I shot the hell out of my AC Walther P-38. It was in pristine condition when I got it and after a lot of rounds you couldn't tell the difference. It shared home defense duties with my Grandad's Colt.
My Remington 10-R got a lot of use too. I put more wear on it than I should have, but I do not regret it. I used it on skunks, quail, snakes, and doves. I even shot 3" magnums out of it before I knew better. :) It ate em' up like a soup sandwich.
These guns were meant to be used. That's how I feel.
Have a good one guys, Josh....

#22 Herr Oberst

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 06:18 AM

Yup, enjoy the range, had the opportunity to fire on several occasions an MP-40 and an MG-42.....beaucoup d'argent mes amis, that ammo ain't cheap.

Like the .45. The Barrett and Beowulf for modern weps are quite humbling.

The k98 and M-1 are equally enjoyable.:)
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#23 Seadog

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 02:40 AM

As a teenager, I would go coon hunting with our neighbor. He was captured at the Bulge and came back with a souvenir Luger. I found it to be a pretty lousy weapon when compared with the M1911A1 match pistol I shot with in Korea. The M1911A1 is usually not very accurate in standard military condition. Reliable as heck, but some would miss a barn at 50 yards. However, I found the match pistol a pleasure to shoot. It belonged to our #2 NCO, a staff sgt who was once on the Army pistol team. I also owned a modified SEABEE carbine for a short while, during my time in Vietnam. It had map pins for sights and had a belt holster to carry it. No big accuracy, but for laying a field of fire in the brush, it was handy to have around.
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#24 mac762

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 03:36 PM

Hey Seadog, What's a modified SeaBee Carbine? I read an article in Soldier of Fortune once about a guy in Vietnam that had modified his carbine by shortening the barrel just in front of the stock. He reattached the sights and crowned the barrle with a ball bearing and some jewler's compound. It had a paratrooper stock. It was an M-2 also. The guy said that when ammo started to get too hard to find for it he burried it in an ammo can after he covered it with grease. It was a neat little weapon. I've been trying to find a copy of that article for a while. He said at the end of the article that he could still find the gun if he went back over there. Wouldn't that be neat? I bet it's still in great shape.

#25 Seadog

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 04:10 AM

The story I was told, there was a shorter than normal barrel on the models issued to the Seabees. It was a M3 that had the stock removed past the grip. I had a triple 30 rd banana clip.

Everyone would carry more than one weapon on patrol. It was common for point men to carry M79s with cannister rounds. Every one of us could shoot expert on the M16, M60 and M79. Our biggest problem was with the M60s due to the amount of use they got. The part that stops the bolt when the trigger is released, had a tendency to wear to the point that the weapon would run on. The solution was either to ride it out, or twist the belt to force the feed to jam. We used to practice so much with all the weapons that we could John Wayne the M60 and accurately hit targets between 100-200 yards.
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