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393rd Infantry Regiment


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#1 Haldeman

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Posted 09 June 2004 - 01:23 AM

Very little is known about my grandfather and his military service. He never talked about it. All I know is his name: Pfc Adam Z. Haldeman, he served with the 393rd Infantry Regiment. Dates of military service are 7/25/1945 to 9/26/1945. From bits a pieces gathered from his children I know that he might have been a bazooka man; changed his middle initial when writing home to let family know where he was (i.e. "F" for France); spoke Pennsylvania German and might have been used as a translator. I have no military papers or the like. Any help would be greatly appreciated by my family and myself. Thank you
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#2 jim1977

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 05:55 PM

My father served in the 393rd Infantry Regiment from December 1942. The regiment arrived in England in Oct of 1944. November 1944 they crossed the channel to France for further transport by trucks to the Ardennes Forest in time for the start of the Battle of the Bulge. The war in Europe ended officially on 8 May 1945. My Dad returned to the US in Dec of 1945.

#3 WW 2 Connections

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 01:27 AM

Would you happen to know the name of the troop ship that transported the 393rd Infantry Regiment to the ETO in 1944?

#4 jim1977

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:16 PM

My father who was a member of HQ Company, 3rd Battalion, 393rd Regiment was transported overseas aboard the SS Argentina, which was a former cruise ship that was transformed into a troop transport. They left Boston and arrived in Southampton, England on 9 Oct 1944.

#5 nomadic52

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 09:39 PM

Hello: My dad, Sgt Charles (Chick) Gilroy was in 393rd Inf. Reg. Company C at the end of the war, Anyone out there who knew him please reply. He and 25 others recived the C I B on May 1 1945 and i have a copy of the orders (with names).It was changed by the President in 1947 to a bronze star for everyone who won the C I B. Would like to know what they did to earn it.

#6 jim1977

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 08:20 PM

As posted previously my father was a member of HQ Company, 3rd Battalion, 393rd Regiment from Dec 1942 till the end of the war in Europe, 8 May 1945. Below is a website that explains the history and eligibility for the Combat Infantryman Badge. To receive the badge one had to be involved in ground combat against enemy forces. Although my father actually received his CIB in orders dated 1 Jan 1945, the orders state his eligibility was effective 17 Dec 1944, the day after the Battle of the Bulge began.
http://www.americal.org/awards/cib.htm
As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall's support of the Bronze Star Medal.
Your father's CIB wasn't changed to a Bronze Star, it would have been given in addition. My father earned a Bronze Star for meritorious achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy from 16-21 Dec 1944. The 1947 policy change resulted in his second award of the Bronze Star.
Hope this helps.

#7 woolno2000

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 05:35 PM

My father was the C.O. of the 393rd during the Bulge. Unfortunately, we did not keep his military records after he passed away. I would like to find out about the 393rd during this period.

Anyone having information on this period, I would enjoy hearing from you.

#8 TD-Tommy776

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 06:21 PM

Welcome to the forum, woolno2000. :) You may want to go to the Information Requests section and pose your question. I'm surprised this thread hasn't been moved over there before now. Since your father was the CO of the 393rd, I would think someone will be able to help you find what you are looking for. Good luck!

After you do that, be sure to go to the New Member section and introduce yourself. You are certain to receive a warm welcome there.

Freedom is precious and many gave their lives for it. It is the duty of the future generation
to remember that sacrifice, and offer some sacrifice for themselves if Freedom is threatened.

Cecil Earl Workman, WWII Veteran, "L" Co., 129th Inf. Regt., 37th Inf. Div.


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PFC Glenn W. Halvorson

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PFC Norman L. Halvorson


#9 Sgt Potier

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 10:47 AM

Hello every body,

I'm in touch with a 99th's daughter , Pvt Edward "Ed" W Allord 393rd Regt . Ed was from New Hampshire and had 3 daughters . He is KIA on march 1945 I suppose in Linz area . I research info about him, battle report, Co and maybe buddies . Katie his second daughter has no info about him during the war .
Thanks to all for your helps .
Sgt Potier

#10 Stan41

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 04:29 PM

For good reading about the 393rd Infantry Regiment I recommend the following books:

"Once Upon A Time In War" by Robert E. Humphrey

"The Longest Winter" by Alex Kershaw

Stan

#11 Slipdigit

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 02:59 AM

For good reading about the 393rd Infantry Regiment I recommend the following books:

"Once Upon A Time In War" by Robert E. Humphrey

"The Longest Winter" by Alex Kershaw

Stan


I have read The Longest Winter. Which is better, in your opinion?

Best Regards,  
JW :slipdigit:

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#12 TobyS

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 04:52 AM

My father was the C.O. of the 393rd during the Bulge. Unfortunately, we did not keep his military records after he passed away. I would like to find out about the 393rd during this period.

Anyone having information on this period, I would enjoy hearing from you.


Hello, My Grandfather just passed away at age 93. He was in Co. B of the 393rd, 99th Infantry Division. I knew him well and we talked many times about his war service. I now have all his contents from the war he saved and after going through it we have many artifacts, pictures and more. Gramp was a replacement and his first day on the line was Jan 1st 45 and served through the end of the war. He was wounded after crossing the Bridge at Remagen. Any specific questions that you have maybe I can help. He participated in the push back in the Bulge from the Elseborn ridge, through the Ardenes, back through Malmedy, Achen Germany I believe and crossed the Rhine under heavy fire. 393rd saw a great deal of action. Crossing that bridge he always said was a day he could never forget. He got hit by an 88 shell, took shrapnel to the shoulder. Whatever I can do to help let me know. What I know I will share. His name was George A. Weeks, from Weeks Mills, ME. I was amazed at how many things he had stashed away. The pictures were from the company medic. After the war he mailed all the negatives and Gramp made copies. His story of crossing at Remagen is something. He told me he remembers watching people go ahead of him, they turned the a corner and started across the bridge and the first half was under horrendous shell fire, the the far half was under the guns, yet they were quick marching across in 2 columns. Only time he broke orders, they came around the corner and he said he ran. Did not care. People yelled get back in line, but he was not going to. He ran over half way, stoped, and got back in line for the rest of the crossing, but was not going to wait to get hit. He got hit the next day. Hope this helps

#13 Slipdigit

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 04:59 AM

Toby,

Would you consider creating a seperate thread and posting anything you feel lead to? The pictures would be great!

Best Regards,  
JW :slipdigit:

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#14 TobyS

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 05:07 AM

I would be glad too. I am just new to this so I will work on learning how. I just today got the box with all the contents. I will try to digitize the photos and share them. Is it possible to do so on the forum? Content i just got, but not yet done all through include his dress uniform, heavy wool coat, long underwear, his actual purple heart in its case, and I was amazed how many newspaper clippings he took out of Stars and Stripes. After being wounded he went back as far as Reims and while there must have read the paper everyday and kept many clippings too. I have yet to read them all.

#15 Slipdigit

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 02:57 PM

Of course you can, and I can say that.

There will be lots of people who read this that will be thankful you did, when they start looking for info on their father, grandfather, uncle, etc.

Put it in this sub-forum, please.

What Granddad did in the War

Best Regards,  
JW :slipdigit:

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#16 TobyS

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 01:31 AM

I was wondering if there is anyone still alive who served in my Grandfather's company. Gramp served in 393rd Infantry Regiment. 1st Bat. Co B 99th Infantry Division. Or at least are there any people who had familily members that were in the same company. Just curious and it would be neet to try to connect with some people.

#17 daved12563

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 07:35 PM

One of the ships carring the Division (the 99th) was the Argentina. There were several others.

#18 daved12563

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 07:43 PM

My Father is Virgil Downing. He served in the 99th, 393d Dakota R&I platoon. He was with the division from beginng to end 1942 to the end of the war. We was assigned to 2nd Battalion on Dec. 16th 1944 scouting a german Pill box when the Adrennes offensive started(Battle of the Buldge). I have a few stores he has shared with me.

#19 LRusso216

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 11:03 PM

Please post the stories. We welcome such submissions.

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Lou


#20 Carla

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 12:25 AM

Hello! I am hoping someone out there can help me. My grandfather, eugene a. Hoch, served in the 393rd 99th and died during the battle of the buldge on dec 17th 1944. My father never knew his father and has always wanted to gather info, pictures or meet someone who knew my grandfather. Now with the Internet this info is easier to retrieve. If anyone has any info or pictures please contact me. I would love for my father to get to know his father in anyway possible. Thank you so much. My email is carlaapatterson@gmail.com.

#21 LRusso216

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 02:52 AM

Here is what it says about the 393rd in Stanton:
Organized at Camp Van Dorn, Miss. 15 Nov 42
Moved to Louisiana Maneuver area 13 Sep 43, then to Camp Maxey, Tx 19 Nov 43
Staged Camp Miles Standish, Mass and departed Boston 30 Sep 44
Arrived England 10 Oct 44. Landed France 1 Nov 44.
Entered Germany 12 Nov 44
Entitled to Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe battle campaigns.

As for the 99th Division, read here for more information Lone Sentry: Battle Babies: The Story of the 99th Infantry Division -- WWII G.I. Stories Booklet

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Lou


#22 Earthican

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 07:02 PM

The 393d Infantry played a key role in holding the northern shoulder of the Ardennes. It therefore has a significant write-up in the official US Army history. Here's an excerpt from the start of the battle and link to the fantastic HyperWar site where it can be read in total.

The Ardennes: Battle of the Bulge (Chapter 5)

"The German Attack Toward Rocherath and Krinkelt
16-17 December


"The 393d Infantry (Lt. Col. Jean D. Scott) had taken no part in the V Corps offensive of 13 December except to put on a "demonstration" in front of the West Wall positions. The regiment, minus its 2d Battalion (attached to the 395th Infantry), was deployed along the German frontier, a line generally defined by the eastern edge of the long forest belt in which the bulk of the 99th Division was stationed and the International Highway. The width of the front, held by the 3d Battalion on the left and the 1st Battalion on the right, was about 5,500 yards. Outposts on the regimental left lay only a few score yards from the West Wall bunkers, but the right was more than half a mile from the German lines. About four miles by trail behind the 393d, the twin villages of Rocherath and Krinkelt lay astride the main north-south road through the division area. In front of the 393d, across the frontier, were entrances to the two forest roads which ran through the regimental sector, one in the north at Hollerath, the second in the south at Udenbreth. Both villages were in enemy hands. At the western edge of the woods the roads converged, funneling along a single track into Rocherath-Krinkelt. The twin villages, therefore, had a tactical importance of the first order. Through them passed the main line of communications in the 2d Division corridor, and from them ran the supply route to the 393d Infantry and the 395th.
..."


#23 woolno2000

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 04:29 AM

TobyS,

Thanks for the input. Would love to compare notes. Dad was C.O. from November 44 (I think) thru the end of the war. I believe that he was probably "infused" when the 99th came on line, as he was XO of a regiment in the 1st Inf. Div. prior to that. We know he was wounded when his CP was hit by German artillery, but I do not know when or where.

I look forward to hearing from you.

#24 woolno2000

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 04:41 AM

Earthican;

Can you shed any light on a mystery? Your extract seems to show that a LTC J.D. Scott was C.O. of the 393rd during the Bulge. Our family history has my father as C.O. (he told me he was). I am NOT challenging your source, simply trying to solve an apparent mystery.

#25 Natman

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 02:59 PM

Found the following at this location: 99th INFANTRY DIVISION

Commanding Officer, 393d Infantry
[TABLE="width: 590"]
[TR]
[TD="width: 50%"]12 Oct 44[/TD]
[TD="width: 50%"]Lt. Col. Jean D. Scott[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 50%"]5 Feb 45[/TD]
[TD="width: 50%"]Lt. Col. James K. Woolnough[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 50%"]26 Mar 45[/TD]
[TD="width: 50%"]Col. James K. Woolnough[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="width: 50%"]7 May 45[/TD]
[TD="width: 50%"]Lt. Col. Logan Clarke

[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]




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