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"Japanese Explanation of S.W. Pacific Reverses"


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#1 JCFalkenbergIII

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:35 AM


LOL. Its funny to see how the Japanese explained their defeats and losses.



"Japanese Explanation of S.W. Pacific Reverses" from Intelligence Bulletin

A short report on an intercepted Japanese broadcast where recent military reverses were explained, from the Intelligence Bulletin, April 1943.
[Editor's Note: The following article is wartime information on enemy tactics and equipment published for Allied soldiers. In most cases, more accurate data is available in postwar publications.]


JAPANESE EXPLANATION OF S.W. PACIFIC REVERSES



According to the Japanese, they won a "strategic" victory in the lower Solomon Islands and in the Gona and Buna areas of New Guinea. The enemy's version of the fighting was given in a report made to the Japanese Diet (parliament) by Major General Sato, Army spokesman representing both the Army and Navy. The report was picked up by the Federal Communications Commission from a Japanese broadcast.
Explaining the Japanese strategy in the South Pacific, General Sato said that their "advance guards," on Guadalcanal and in New Guinea, held the American and Australian troops until the Japanese main forces could consolidate positions closer to their supply bases "for a concrete operation in the future."
". . . At the beginning of September," General Sato said, "We crossed the Stanley Mountain range and neared the vicinity of Port Moresby. However, owing to general circumstances, our unit withdrew to the vicinity of Buna, and began the task of diverting the enemy to this area."
General Sato claimed that the Japanese "withdrew" from Buna and Guadalcanal only after accomplishing their objectives—holding United Nations forces until the main Japanese forces were well established in the rear. "The withdrawal of our forces in both areas was carried out in an orderly manner and, moreover, in a calm manner, while always attacking the enemy and keeping him under control." General Sato admitted that the Guadalcanal operation was "nerve-wracking" because the Japanese units "had to operate several thousand nautical miles away from the base line which connects Malaya and the Philippine Islands. Therefore, it was inevitable to have differences in effectiveness and speed of operations between our forces and the enemy forces . . . Because of this fact, it would have been ignoble strategy for our forces to have sought a decisive battle in a location strategically disadvantageous." ". . . Due to such harmonious unity between our Army and Navy," General Sato continued, "the most difficult strategy—a withdrawal under the very noses of the enemy—was done calmly and in an orderly manner, with almost no losses. This is something unprecedented in the world."

Lone Sentry: Japanese Explanation of S.W. Pacific Reverses (WWII U.S. Intelligence Bulletin, April 1943)
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman.

#2 Slipdigit

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 02:17 PM

They could try to polish that turd all they want but it was still a turd.

Best Regards,  
JW :slipdigit:

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#3 skunk works

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 03:47 PM

Reminds me of Tarik Aziz

I did have a video of him talking (joke one) about how "the Americans are not near Baghdad." and then Saddam's statue falls on him in mid sentence, but I can't find it now.

Perhaps Sato was Aziz's tutor ?:confused:
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says "Yes", you know he's a crook. Groucho Marx

#4 Za Rodinu

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 05:59 PM

We even have the ineffable Al Sahaf, the Iraqi Information Minister in our smiley gallery :al-Sahaf:

Yes, lying to yourselves has always proved to be an excellent strategy. Who needs an enemy when you have yoursef? Just ask Hitler.

Quousque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra...


#5 skunk works

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 07:50 PM

That's the guy Za, I get the two mixed up

YouTube - Mohammed Saeed Al Sahaf
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]There's one way to find out if a man is honest-ask him. If he says "Yes", you know he's a crook. Groucho Marx

#6 JCFalkenbergIII

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 02:13 AM

Just looks like the Axis had to be totally delusionable in order to convince thier populations to continue.
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For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman.

#7 Devilsadvocate

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Posted 01 January 2009 - 04:56 AM

LOL. Its funny to see how the Japanese explained their defeats and losses.



"Japanese Explanation of S.W. Pacific Reverses" from Intelligence Bulletin

A short report on an intercepted Japanese broadcast where recent military reverses were explained, from the Intelligence Bulletin, April 1943.
[Editor's Note: The following article is wartime information on enemy tactics and equipment published for Allied soldiers. In most cases, more accurate data is available in postwar publications.]


JAPANESE EXPLANATION OF S.W. PACIFIC REVERSES



According to the Japanese, they won a "strategic" victory in the lower Solomon Islands and in the Gona and Buna areas of New Guinea. The enemy's version of the fighting was given in a report made to the Japanese Diet (parliament) by Major General Sato, Army spokesman representing both the Army and Navy. The report was picked up by the Federal Communications Commission from a Japanese broadcast.
Explaining the Japanese strategy in the South Pacific, General Sato said that their "advance guards," on Guadalcanal and in New Guinea, held the American and Australian troops until the Japanese main forces could consolidate positions closer to their supply bases "for a concrete operation in the future."
". . . At the beginning of September," General Sato said, "We crossed the Stanley Mountain range and neared the vicinity of Port Moresby. However, owing to general circumstances, our unit withdrew to the vicinity of Buna, and began the task of diverting the enemy to this area."
General Sato claimed that the Japanese "withdrew" from Buna and Guadalcanal only after accomplishing their objectives—holding United Nations forces until the main Japanese forces were well established in the rear. "The withdrawal of our forces in both areas was carried out in an orderly manner and, moreover, in a calm manner, while always attacking the enemy and keeping him under control." General Sato admitted that the Guadalcanal operation was "nerve-wracking" because the Japanese units "had to operate several thousand nautical miles away from the base line which connects Malaya and the Philippine Islands. Therefore, it was inevitable to have differences in effectiveness and speed of operations between our forces and the enemy forces . . . Because of this fact, it would have been ignoble strategy for our forces to have sought a decisive battle in a location strategically disadvantageous." ". . . Due to such harmonious unity between our Army and Navy," General Sato continued, "the most difficult strategy—a withdrawal under the very noses of the enemy—was done calmly and in an orderly manner, with almost no losses. This is something unprecedented in the world."

Lone Sentry: Japanese Explanation of S.W. Pacific Reverses (WWII U.S. Intelligence Bulletin, April 1943)


It's ironic that the Japanese used the excuse that it would have been "ignoble strategy" to seek a decisive battle in a location that was "strategically disadvantageous" because that is exactly what they did at Guadalcanal.

Given the arrogance of the Japanese and their unwarranted belief in their own invincibility, I do not find it difficult at all to understand their fatal unwillingness to come to grips with reality. After all, that was what underlay their aggressive approach to territorial acquisition and the ridiculous assumption of their own military superiority.

#8 John Dudek

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 11:04 PM

The Japanese were led by a "Divine Emperor" who would bring all the corners of the earth under one leader. The entire Japanese populace knew this down to the very soul and marrow of their being. How could they lose?




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