Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

American Military Hospitals in the ETO


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 mikebatzel

mikebatzel

    Dreadnaught

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,182 posts

Posted 30 July 2008 - 12:28 PM

The European Theater of Operations which was to conduct the US Army’s largest and most complex land campaign of WW2 and complete the destruction of Nazi Germany, had rather modest beginnings! In agreement with its Allies, the United States Government decided to deal with ‘Germany first’ …
The initial objective was to establish Army Forces in the British Isles in order to protect them from a possible enemy invasion; another objective was to relieve a number of British troops for operations in the Mediterranean, and to reinforce the Royal Air Force with aircraft and personnel.
US Military Observers were sent to Great Britain to keep abreast of British wartime technical developments and to study the overall British war effort (the United States was not yet at war). Late 1940, the Medical Department dispatched an official Observer (Col. Raymond W. Bliss) to report on Hospitalization and Evacuation methods. American medical help had already been sent in the form of a “Contagious Disease Treatment and Control Unit”, officially designated the American Red Cross – Harvard Field Hospital Unit including a laboratory, a 125-bed Hospital, and a number of mobile investigating teams. Their task was to assist the British Ministry of Health in combating outbreaks of paratyphoid, scabies, and other diseases which were a constant threat in the crowded and bomb damaged cities.
The first US Army Military Mission to England set up its Headquarters in London, on May 19, 1941. In charge was Maj. Gen. James E. Chaney (US Air Corps) who headed the delegation formerly designated “Special Observers Group” (SPOBS). Anything that was deemed – nice to know, or necessary to know – was investigated, collected, and requested. Medical and sanitary conditions, hospital distribution, medical organization, evacuation of wounded, preventive medicine, number of beds, medical emergencies, all this information was of utmost importance to the USWD in preparation of medical planning. In mid-September 1941, Col. Paul R. Hawley (MC) was transferred to the United Kingdom to draft and prepare full plans for an American medical build-up and support in Northern Ireland and the British Isles. After the attack against Pearl Harbor, the War Department activated the Headquarters, United States Army Forces in the British Isles (USAFBI), the date was January 8, 1942, Chief Surgeon was Col. Paul R. Hawley. The same month, i.e. on January 24, 1942, another organization was created, the United States Army Northern Ireland Force (USANIF).
The first US Army medical contingents were now about to enter the “European Theater of Operations”

Background Information:

Early World War 2 Period:
Furnishing hospitalization facilities for overseas areas became another phase of the US War Department plans. Projects to garrison the Atlantic Bases got under way early in 1941; a first medical group was sent to St. John’s, Newfoundland in January, and other groups followed to Trinidad and Bermuda in April. In the fall of 1941, the very first medical units were sent to Iceland.
During the period January - July 1942, inclusive, a large number of Hospital Units moved overseas: 2 Evacuation , 2 Surgical, 4 General, 14 Station Hospitals went to Australia – 2 Evacuation , 2 General, and 2 Station Hospitals were shipped to the South Pacific – 2 Station Hospitals were transferred to the Central Pacific – 1 General and 1 Station Hospital went to Northern Ireland – 1 General Hospital to Iceland – 2 General and 3 Station Hospitals </STRONG>to England – and more later embarked for India and northwest Canada.
In March 1942 the reorganization of the War Department, and the creation of three main Commands – Army Air Forces, Army Ground Forces, and Services of Supply (called ASF after March 1943), were to cause several conflicts within the United States Armed Forces. Within the War Department, and among some elements of the SOS, such as the Quartermaster Corps and the Medical Department, functions, responsibilities, authority, control, and matters of activation, training, and supply became critical subjects for constant review among AGF and SOS staff, leading to disputes about general planning for Hospitalization and Evacuation! Directives were issued June 18, 1942 compiling policies and procedures governing H & E, but were only finalized in November of the same year.
Meanwhile new Hospital Units were earmarked for special task forces and deployment to North Africa (Operation “Gymnast”), Northern Ireland (Operation “Magnet”), and England (Operation “Bolero”).

World War 2:
By March 15, 1943, the War Department had already shipped overseas, 140 Station, 27 General, 14 Field, 2 Convalescent, 3 Surgical, and 23 EvacuationHospitals.
The Surgeon General furnished adequately trained and equipped Army Service Forces Hospital units for the Theaters of Operations, where numbered Station, Field, and General Hospitals became the most important medical installations. In the years from June 30, 1943 to June 30, 1945 the Medical Department trained 189 GeneralHospitals, 74 Field Hospitals and 61 StationHospitalsfor overseas service. In fiscal 1945, when the peak of overseas shipments occurred, the WD sent 81 General, 35 Field, and 8 StationHospitalsto the various Theaters of Operations. By May 1945, when the peak in Hospital beds overseas was reached, there were 335,000 fixed beds and about 87,000 mobile beds in all Theaters. The E.T.O. alone had approximately 700 Hospital units of all kinds in operation overseas at this time …
During the period June 30, 1943toJune 30, 1945, the MD’s task of hospitalizing sick and wounded personnel exceeded that of any previous period in the history of the U.S. Army. In that same period 5,050,718 Army patients were admitted to overseas Hospitals, and 6,002,013 to ZI Hospitals! The number of patients in Hospitals overseas increased from 47,446 on June 30, 1943 to 266,466 at the end of January 1945. Effective evacuation to the Zone of Interior reduced this number to 138,486 by June 30, 1945. Meanwhile, the number of Hospital patients in the United States increased from 167,713 on June 30, 1943 to a peak of 303,102 by June 30, 1945 (at this time, the number of authorized beds for all Hospitals in the ZI was only 314,588). To cope with this situation, The Surgeon General’s Hospital program revised the ZI Hospital system, developed and perfected a system of specialized General Hospitals, provided additional General and Convalescent Hospital beds, improved the overall administration of Hospitals, and inaugurated a program of increased standards of maintenance and improvement of Hospital facilities.

Here follows a tentative list of Military Hospitals active in the European Theater of Operations:
Convalescent Hospitals:

The Medical Department was impressed by the effectiveness of the British Convalescent & Rehabilitation system, and as a result of their survey, it ordered the building of special reconditioning camps. A first Rehabilitation Center opened on April 19, 1943 in Worcestershire, followed by a second on October 5, 1943 in Warwickshire. These centres were at first staffed by personnel from the 16th Station Hospital, reinforced by 5 Officers and 7 EM who had trained in British Convalescent camps. The 8th Convalescent Hospital took over temporarily, while the second Center started operations with 307th Station and 77th Station Hospital personnel. These projects effectively triggered activation of US Convalescent Hospitals in the ETO.
2d CONV HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France
4th CONV HOSP – ETO 24 Jun 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium – Germany
6th CONV HOSP – ETO – Belgium - Germany
7th CONV HOSP – ETO – England - France - Germany
8th CONV HOSP – ETO 28 Apr 44 England – France

Evacuation Hospitals:

2d EVAC HOSP – USANIF 27 Sep 42 – 10 Feb 44 England – Belgium (ex-4th EVAC HOSP, disbanded 24 Aug 42, split in 2 different units, the 2d EVAC HOSP sent to Northern Ireland, 4 Sep 42, and the 48th EVAC HOSP transferred to India 18 Jan 43)
4th EVAC HOSP – 10 Feb 40 (disbanded 24 Aug 42, redesignated 2d EVAC HOSP, embarked for Northern Ireland 4 Sep 42, redesignated 48th EVAC HOSP, embarked for India 18 Jan 43)
5th EVAC HOSP – ETO 13 Jun 44 France – Belgium - Germany
6th EVAC HOSP – 10 Feb 40 (disbanded 24 Aug 42, redesignated 9th EVAC HOSP, embarked for England26 Sep 42)
9th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 26 Sep 42 – 1 Nov 44 France (ex-6th EVAC HOSP, disbanded 24 Aug 42, supplied enlisted personnel to other units, including this Hospital)
11th EVAC HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France
12th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 6 Jan 43 - ETO – 7 Sep 44 France - Belgium (ex-19th EVAC HOSP, disbanded 25 Aug 42)
19th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 6 Jan 43 (disbanded 25 Aug 42, split in 2 newly designated units; 7th EVAC HOSP sent to Tongatabu 7 Apr 42, and the 12th EVAC HOSP transferred to England)
24th EVAC HOSP – ETO 12 Jun 44 France – 19 Sep 44 Belgium
27th EVAC HOSP – MTO 20 Apr 44 - ETO 1 Nov 44 France
32d EVAC HOSP – USANIF 24 Feb 44 – 12 Mar 44 England - 5 Feb 45 Germany
34th EVAC HOSP – ETO 27 Feb 44 – 23 Jun 44 France – 2 Feb 45 Luxembourg – Mar 45 Germany
35th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 18 Feb 44 – 23 Jun 44 France – 26 Dec 44 Luxembourg – 6 Mar 45 Germany
38th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 5 Aug 42 (inactivated 8 Sep 45)
39th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 18 Feb 43 – 20 Jul 44 France – 23 Dec 44 Belgium - Germany
41st EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 13 Nov 43 - ETO 13 Jun 44 France
42d EVAC HOSP – 1 Jun 41 (disbanded 15 Oct 42, partly split in 2 separate units; the newly designated 27th EVAC HOSP, embarked for North Africa 3 Apr 44, and the designated 77th EVAC HOSP, which embarked for England 5 Aug 42)
44th EVAC HOSP – USFBI 26 Nov 43 - ETO 19 Jun 44 France – 12 Sep 44 Belgium – 9 Feb 45 Germany – 23 Sep 45 France (medical support to former KZ-Nordhausen inmates from 16 Apr to 4 May 45, to ZI 10 Nov 45, and inactivated 21 Nov 45)
45th EVAC HOSP – ETO 13 Jun 44 France - Mar 45 Belgium – 30 Apr 45 Germany (operated as StationHospital at KZ-Buchenwald)
51st EVAC HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 – Dec 44 Belgium – Germany
59th EVAC HOSP – MTO 25 Aug 44 Southern France – 26 Mar 45 Germany (after serving in French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and Southern France, the unit was transferred from NATOUSA to ETOUSA, 1 Nov 44; on 10 May 45, part of the Hospital staff was detailed to the recently liberated KZ-Dachau, where the 59th EVAC HOSP C.O. was assigned as Camp Surgeon, assisted by personnel of the 116th EVAC and 127th EVAC HOSP)
65th EVAC HOSP – ETO 44 France – Belgium - Germany
67th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 29 Nov 43 - ETO 17 Jun 44 France – 25 Sep 44 Luxembourg - 31 Oct 44 Belgium – 14 Feb 45 Germany – 13 May 45 Czechoslovakia
77th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 5 Aug 42 – 21 Jul 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium (ex-42d EVAC HOSP, disbanded 15 Oct 42)
91st EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 8 Nov 43 – ETO 10 Jun 44 France – 7 Sep 44 Holland - 15 March 44 Germany (ex-6th SURG HOSP, to ZI 2 Sep 45)
93d EVAC HOSP – ETO Nov 44 – Jan 45 France – Germany (ex-61st SURG HOSP)
95th EVAC HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 – France (ex-74th SURG HOSP)
96th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 28 Feb 44 – ETO 16 Jun 44 France – 28 Sep 44 Belgium – 22 Nov 44 Germany – 27 Dec 44 Belgium – 25 Feb 45 Germany (ex-8th SURG HOSP, 96th EVAC HOSP inactivated 11 Mar 45)
97th EVAC HOSP – ETO 17 Jun 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium
100th EVAC HOSP – ETO 11 Feb 44 England – 18 Jul 44 France
102d EVAC HOSP – ETO Dec 44 Belgium – Dec 44 Luxembourg – 18 Dec 44 Belgium
103d EVAC HOSP – ETO Aug 44 France
104th EVAC HOSP – ETO Jul 45 France – Central Europe
105th EVAC HOSP – ETO 3 Sep 44 England – 5 Oct 44 France – 16 Oct 44 Holland – 16 Oct 44 Belgium – 28 Oct 44 Holland – 8 Mar 45 Germany (inactivated 2 Sep 45)
106th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France - Germany
107th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France – Dec 44 Belgium – 22 Dec 44 France – Dec 44 Luxembourg – 16 Mar 45 Germany
108th EVAC HOSP – ETO 18 Apr 45 Germany
109th EVAC HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – France
110th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France – Luxembourg – Belgium - Germany
111th EVAC HOSP – ETO Oct 44 Holland
116th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France – Jun 45 Germany (also provided medical assistance to former inmates of KZ-Dachau)
117th EVAC HOSP – ETO 44 France - Germany
118th EVAC HOSP – ETO Apr 45 Germany
120th EVAC HOSP – ETO 21 Dec 44 England – 6 Mar 45 France – 30 Mar 45 Germany (took over SS-barracks and arranged for medical treatment of former inmates, political prisoners, and slave-laborers at KZ-Buchenwald, as from 5 Apr 45 onwards, assigned to provide medical care of DPs in certain areas of Germany, as from 29 Apr 45, relieved by 7th FLD HOSP 2 Jun 45)
121st EVAC HOSP – ETO – Germany - Austria (responsible for medical treatment of former inmates at KZ-Flossenburg)
122d EVAC HOSP – ETO
123d EVAC HOSP – ETO Jan 45 France – Mar 45 Germany – Jul 45 France - Sep 45 Germany
124th EVAC HOSP - ETO
127th EVAC HOSP – ETO 30 Apr 45 Germany (responsible for treatment of former inmates, prisoners and slave-laborers at KZ-Dachau)
128th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 2 Aug 42 – ETO 7 Nov 43 England – 10 Jun 44 France – Belgium (ex-48th SURG HOSP, redesignated 128th STA HOSP 1 May 43)
132d EVAC HOSP – ETO – France
139th EVAC HOSP – ETO 44 Germany – 45 Austria
172d EVAC HOSP - ETO

Field Hospitals:

6th FLD HOSP – USFBI Jun-Jul 44 - ETO 24 Apr 45
7th FLD HOSP – USANIF 14 Sep 43 – USAFBI 26 Oct 43 - ETO 4 Jul 44 France
8th FLD HOSP – ETO 20 Jul 44 France
9th FLD HOSP – ETO 12 Jul 44 France – 9 Sep 44 Belgium – Germany
10th FLD HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France (inactivated 4 Nov 45)
11th FLD HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France
12th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – 26 Jun 44 France – Belgium (also responsible for medical treatment of German PWs)
13th FLD HOSP – ETO 7 Jun 44 France
14th FLD HOSP – ETO 44
16th FLD HOSP – ETO 17 Mar 44 England – 24 Jul 44 France - Germany
24th FLD HOSP – ETO Jun 44 France – Belgium
26th FLD HOSP – ETO 18 Feb 45 France
28th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – France
29th FLD HOSP – USAFBI 26 Sep 43 – 16 Jun 44 England – France
30th FLD HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
39th FLD HOSP – ETO 11 Mar 44 England – 22 Jun 44 France – 30 Sep 44 Belgium – 11 Mar 45 Holland – 30 Mar 45 Belgium - 24 Apr 45 Germany – 18 Jun 45 France (England, first assignment to Ninth US Air Force/AAF 519, primarily a USAAF Hospital, each of the 3 Platoons operated as ‘separate’ Air Force Clearing Stations)
42d FLD HOSP – ETO Mar 44 England – 8 Jun 44 France – 17 Sep 44 Holland - 16 Dec 44 Belgium – 24 Dec 44 France - 9 Jan 45 Belgium – 13 Apr 45 Germany
43d FLD HOSP – USAFBI Dec 43
45th FLD HOSP – ETO 8 Jun 44 France
46th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – France - Belgium
47th FLD HOSP – ETO Aug 44 France - Dec 44 Belgium
48th FLD HOSP – ETO Apr 44 England - France – Germany - Austria
50th FLD HOSP- USFBI 9 Mar 44 - ETO 12 Sep 44 France – 17 Sep 44 Holland – 27 Sep 44 Belgium – 14 Oct 44 Holland – 8 Apr 45 Germany – 14 Jul 45 France
51st FLD HOSP – ETO 8 Jun 44 France – 9 Sep 44 Belgium – 16 Sep 44 Germany – 29 Dec 44 Belgium – 10 Feb 45 Germany
53d FLD HOSP – ETO 27 Apr 44 England – 15 Jul 44 France – 2 Oct 44 Belgium – 14 Oct 44 Holland – 12 Dec 44 Germany (ex-229th STA HOSP, attached to 31st Med Gp in Germany, all 3 Hospital Units ceased operations between 13 and 15 Jul 45, to ZI 10 Nov 45 out of France)
54th FLD HOSP – ETO Oct 44 France
57th FLD HOSP – ETO 14 Mar 44 England
59th FLD HOSP – ETO – France
60th FLD HOSP – ETO - Belgium
61st FLD HOSP – ETO – England - Germany
62d FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – Germany
63d FLD HOSP – ETO 12 Nov 44 England
64th FLD HOSP – ETO 18 Nov 44 England – France – Germany (to SWPA 16 Aug 45, diverted at sea to ZI 25 Aug 45)
65th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 Belgium – Luxembourg – Germany - Austria
66th FLD HOSP – ETO – Belgium - Germany
67th FLD HOSP – ETO 44
77th FLD HOSP – ETO 8 Apr 45 France (in charge of RAMPS evacuation)
78th FLD HOSP- ETO – England – Italy – France - Germany
83d FLD HOSP – ETO – Germany
96th FLD HOSP – ETO - France

General Hospitals:

1st GEN HOSP – USAFBI 28 Dec 43 - ETO 44 England – France
2d GEN HOSP – USANIF 1 Jul 42 - USAFBI 17 Jul 42 - ETO Nov 44 France (ex-209th GEN HOSP, 2d GEN HOSP inactivated 10 Jun 43, supplied cadres for other units, but only disbanded 11 Nov 44)
3d GEN HOSP – ETO 29 Sep 44 France
5th GEN HOSP – USANIF 4 Mar 42 – USAFBI 12 May 42 - 6 Jul 44 France (returned from Nova Scotia to Boston P/E, embarked again for Northern Ireland 12 May 42, ex-66th GEN HOSP, 5th GEN HOSP planned for inactivation, later marked for transfer to SWPA, instead of inactivation 15 Apr 43, disbandment 11 Nov 44 – contradiction of sources)
7th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 5 Dec 43 England
15th GEN HOSP – ETO 21 Sep 44 Belgium
16th GEN HOSP – ETO 7 Jul 44 England
19th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 5 Sep 43 - ETO 20 Aug 44 France
21st GEN HOSP – USAFBI 20 Oct 42 - ETO Sep 44 France – 28 Oct 44 Belgium – 7 Jan 45 Germany (to ZI 28 Oct 45, inactivated 7 Nov 45)
22d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
23d GEN HOSP – ETO 18 Oct 44 France
25th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 23 Dec 43 - ETO Nov 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium
26th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 20 Oct 42 (inactivated 15 Sep 45)
28th GEN HOSP – USAFBI - Jun 44 England – France - 5 Oct 44 Belgium
30th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 4 Jun 42 - ETO Nov 44 France (ex-207th GEN HOSP, 30th GEN HOSP inactivated 15 Jan 43, supplied cadres for other units, but only disbanded 11 Nov 44)
32d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 5 Sep 43 - ETO 17 Aug 44 France – Nov 44 Belgium – Mar 45 Germany – 12 Aug 45 France (to ZI 3 Oct 45)
36th GEN HOSP – ETO 9 Sep 44
39th GEN HOSP – ETO - France
40th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
42d GEN HOSP – ETO – France
43d GEN HOSP – ETO 19 Sep 44
44th GEN HOSP – ETO - France
46th GEN HOSP – ETO 8 Sep 44
47th GEN HOSP – ETO Aug 44 France – Belgium
48th GEN HOSP – ETO Apr 44 England – 23 Sep 44 France – Germany – Austria
50th GEN HOSP - USAFBI 29 Dec 43 – 15 Jul 44 France
52d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 6 Jan 43 – 6 Jul 45 England
55th GEN HOSP – ETO 3 Jul 44 England
56th GEN HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 Belgium
58th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Oct 43 - ETO Nov 44 France
62d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Mar 44 – 3 Sep 44 France
65th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 13 Oct 43
67th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 24 Nov 42
68th GEN HOSP – ETO 10 May 44 England
74th GEN HOSP – ETO 7 Mar 44 England
76th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 Belgium
78th GEN HOSP – ETO - England
79th GEN HOSP – USANIF 17 Oct 43 – USAFBI
82d GEN HOSP – ETO 10 Mar 44 England
83d GEN HOSP – ETO England
90th GEN HOSP – ETO 18 Oct 44 France
91st GEN HOSP – ETO 43 England
95th GEN HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – 18 Oct 44 France
96th GEN HOSP – ETO England (possessed psychiatric facilities for prolonged treatment and rehabilitation of patients)
97th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
98th GEN HOSP – ETO – France - Germany
99th GEN HOSP – ETO 20 Apr 44 England – 29 Sep 44 France
100th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 14 Apr 43 – 16 May 44 England – 22 Aug 44 France (returned to ZI 20 Aug 45)
101st GEN HOSP – ETO England – 10 Jul 45 Germany
102d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
103d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
104th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
106th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
108th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 17 Oct 43 – 29 Jul 44 France (FIRST Hospital to enter Paris on 29 Aug 44, and to open in the French Capital on 2 Sep 44, designated to study the ‘Trenchfoot’ problem on behalf of US Army, treated a lot of German PW patients at the 'Beaujon Hospital')
110th GEN HOSP - ETO Nov 44 England
111th GEN HOSP – ETO England
112th GEN HOSP – ETO England
117th GEN HOSP – ETO 5 Aug 44 England
121st GEN HOSP – ETO Aug 44 England – Jun 45 Germany (to SWPA, diverted to ETO / Germany Jul 45)
122d GEN HOSP – ETO England
123d GEN HOSP – ETO England
124th GEN HOSP – ETO Jul 44 England – 10 Aug 45 Austria
125th GEN HOSP – ETO England
127th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Oct 43 - ETO 20 Aug 44 France (to CBI Theater)
130th GEN HOSP – ETO England – France – Dec 44 Belgium
135th GEN HOSP – ETO England
137th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 England
140th GEN HOSP – ETO England
152d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 43
156th GEN HOSP – ETO England – 19 Jun 44 France
157th GEN HOSP – ETO England
158th GEN HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
159th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
164th GEN HOSP – ETO 24 Sep 44 France (first Gen Hosp to arrive in France, together with the 165th Gen Hosp, expanded to 200-bed capacity 29 Nov 44, transferred to Marseilles Staging Area for possible assignment to Pacific Theater, after V-J Day shipped to ZI 23 Aug 45, arrived at Newport News 2 Sep 45, inactivated 9 Nov 45)
165th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
166th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France (converted to hospital care for German PWs)
167th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
168th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
170th GEN HOSP – ETO 30 Sep 44 England - 3 Oct 44 France (inactivated, 29 Jun 45)
179th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 France
182d GEN HOSP – ETO 5 Apr 44 England (assisted by the 682d General Hospital Complementary Unit, active from 16 May 44 to 31 Oct 45 in the UK, designated Prison Hospital for all US Army Prisoners in the Western Base from 7 Jun 44 onwards, closed down 11 Jun 45, but only effective 16 Jun 45, later successively assigned to 804th HOSP CEN, 12th HOSP CEN, 802d HOSP CEN, 905th HOSP CEN, and 805th HOSP CEN in the UK)
185th GEN HOSP – ETO England
187th GEN HOSP – ETO England – France – Belgium
188th GEN HOSP – ETO 8 Apr 44 England - France
191st GEN HOSP – ETO 44 France
192d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
195th GEN HOSP – ETO France
201st GEN HOSP – ETO 7 Nov 44 England – 26 Dec 44 France
203d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Jan 44 - ETO 22 Jul 44 France – 4 Aug 45 Belgium – 14 Sep 45 France (to ZI 18 Nov 45, arrived 29 Nov 45, and inactivated)
207th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 4 Jun 42
209th GEN HOSP – USAFBI Jul 42 England
216th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 25 Feb 44 – 16 Jun 45 France – 12 Sep 45 Germany (to ZI 31 Mar 46)
217th GEN HOSP – ETO 6 Sep 44 France
221st GEN HOSP – ETO France
235th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 France
241st GEN HOSP – ETO - England – France
242d GEN HOSP – ETO 16 Dec 44 England – Jan 45 France – Belgium (to SWPA, diverted at sea to ZI)
247th GEN HOSP – 15 Oct 44 (consolidated with 237th STA HOSP, to form the 71st GEN HOSP 7 Feb 47)
297th GEN HOSP – ETO 30 May 44 England
298th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 11 Nov 42 - ETO 16 Jul 44 France – 20 Nov 44 Belgium
306th GEN HOSP – ETO 8 Apr 45 France (in charge of RAMPS evacuation)
317th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 England

Notes: ETO “Blood Banks” were set up at the 2d – 5th – 30th – 52d – 67th – 127th and 298th General Hospitals stationed in the United Kingdom The 40th – 48th – 62d – 108th – 203d – 217th General Hospitals, all located in and around Paris, France, from late Aug 44 to V-E Day, were grouped in 2 Hospital Centers, the 814th and 815th.
Between 1 May – 15 Jun 45, elements of the 9th – 50th – 61st – 62d- 78th – 83d Field Hospitals supported PW enclosures and established new PW Hospital Centers with German medics working under supervision of American Medical Battalions.
By 2 Jun 45, Third US Army operated a total of 237 Hospitals in Germany, 3 for RAMPS, 13 for DPs, and the remainder for German PWs (in that period over 3 million enemy PWs were in American hands).

Hospital Trains:

HOSP TRAIN No. 1 – 8 Feb 44 England – ETO Rhineland - Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 3 – 20 Apr 44 Wales – 19 May 44 England – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 4 – 2 Feb 44 England – 23 Apr 44 Scotland - ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 5 – 7 Mar 44 England – 23 Apr 44 Scotland
HOSP TRAIN No. 6 – 7 Mar 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 7 – 3 Jun 43 England – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 8 – 13 Mar 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 9 – ETO 31 Oct 45 Northern France - Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 10 – ETO Normandy – Northern France
HOSP TRAIN No. 11 – 31 May 44 England – ETO 4 Aug 44 Normandy – Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace (first improvised HOSP TRAIN, consisting of French freight cars fitted with litter brackets, ran between St. Lô and Cherbourg, 4 Aug 44)
HOSP TRAIN No. 12 – 21 May 44 England – ETO Normandy – Northern France - Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 13 – 21 May 44 England – 24 May 44 Wales - ETO Normandy – Northern France (later redesignated 7th Hospital Train)
HOSP TRAIN No. 14 – 21 May 44 England - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 15 – 30 May 44 Wales – ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 16 – 7 May 44 England – 30 May 44 Wales – ETO Northern France – Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 17 – ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 18 – 26 Mar 44 England – 10 Jun 44 Scotland – 8 Sep 44 Wales – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 20 – 30 May 44 Wales – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 21 – 24 Oct 44 England – Wales - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 22 – 30 May 44 Wales – 15 Jun 44 England – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 23 – 14 Sep 43 England – 24 Mar 44 Scotland – ETO Sep 44 France -Central Europe (partly destroyed by German bombing, at the Gare St. Lazare, Paris, 26 Dec 44)
HOSP TRAIN No. 24 – 14 Sep 43 England – ETO 29 Sep 44 Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 25 – 6 Jul 44 England – 25 Jul 44 Scotland – ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 26 – 6 Jul 44 England – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe (inactivated 10 Sep 45)
HOSP TRAIN No. 27 – ETO 14 Aug 44 France (FIRST Hospital Train to reach the continent, disembarked in France 14 Aug 44, carrying the 43d GEN HOSP on board, also the very FIRST one to reach Paris 2 Sep 44, with part of the 203d GEN HOSP)
HOSP TRAIN No. 31– ETO 5 Jul 45 Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 34 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 37 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 38 – ETO Oct 44 Belgium
HOSP TRAIN No. 41 – MTO Naples-Foggia – Rome-Arno – North Apennines - ETO Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 42 – MTO Rome-Arno – Southern France - ETO 10 Sep 44 Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 43 – 11 Mar 43 England - ETO 14 Aug 44 Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 44 – 13 Nov 43 Northern Ireland - 17 May 44 England - ETO Northern France - Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 45 – 26 Jun 43 England - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 47 – 6 Apr 44 Scotland – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 49 – 6 Apr 44 Scotland
HOSP TRAIN No. 55 – 27 Jul 44 England – 2 Aug 44 Wales - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 56 – ETO 20 May 45 Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 57 – 25 Feb 44 England (inactivated 12 Nov 45)
HOSP TRAIN No. 58 – 25 Nov 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 59 – 6 Sep 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 73 – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 74 – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 76 – ETO Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 77 – ETO Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 79 – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 80– ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 82 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 83 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace

Station Hospitals:

3d STA HOSP – USAFBI 30 Jun 42
7th STA HOSP – USANIF 26 Sep 42 (to MTO 22 Nov 42, inactivated 15 Sep 45)
10th STA HOSP – USANIF 26 Jan 42 - USAFBI
15th STA HOSP – ETO England
16th STA HOSP – USAFBI 3 Jun 42 – USAFBI 19 Apr 43 (opened Rehabilitation Center No. 1 for Officers, active 19 Apr 431 Sep 43)
23d STA HOSP – ETO 19 Sep 44 France
28th STA HOSP – USANIF 26 Oct 43
33d STA HOSP – USAFBI
35th STA HOSP – ETO 20 Sep 44 France
36th STA HOSP – USANIF 12 Sep 43 – England (opened a special center for psychotics and non-combat related mental disorder in 1943)
38th STA HOSP – USAFBI 5 May 42 - ETO Jun 44 England
45th STA HOSP – ETO – Germany ((ex-45th EVAC HOSP 1 May 45)
49th STA HOSP – IBC Sep 42 - ETO 9 Jul 43 England
51st STA HOSP – ETO 15 Nov 44 France
68th STA HOSP – USANIF 22 Dec 43
69th STA HOSP – ETO 18 Nov 44 France
70th STA HOSP – ETO 18 Oct 44 France
77th STA HOSP – ETO 44 England
78th STA HOSP – ETO 13 Sep 44 France
80th STA HOSP – ETO 14 Sep 44 France
110th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – 2 Aug 45 Austria
115th STA HOSP –USAFBI 43 - 17 May 44 England
120th STA HOSP – USAFBI Jun 43
121st STA HOSP – ETO – England
127th STA HOSP – ETO Apr 44 England – Germany (second Hospital in charge of blood collection at Salisbury Blood Collection & Processing Plant, 26 Aug 44)
130th STA HOSP – ETO – Germany (the unit where G. S. PATTON Jr died on 21 Dec 45 at 1755 hrs)
150th STA HOSP – ETO - England
151st STA HOSP – USAFBI 30 Jun 42 (inactivated 5 Jun 44, personnel & equipment absorbed by 12th GEN HOSP)
152d STA HOSP – USAFBI 5 May 42 - ETO 19 Sep 44 France (first Hospital in charge of blood collection at Salisbury Blood Collection & Processing Plant, 15 Apr 44 – sent first refrigeration trucks ashore after D-Day, to Omaha Beach 7 Jun 44, and to Utah Beach 9 Jun 44)
160th STA HOSP – USANIF 19 Sep 42
168th STA HOSP – USAFBI 3 Aug 43 – France (had a complement of 63 black nurses who provided medical care for German PWs, supervised and commanded by white American Officers – exceptional situation in view of segregated US Army)
180th STA HOSP – ETO 13 Sep 44 France
228th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England - France
232d STA HOSP – ETO England
279th STA HOSP – ETO Jan 44 England – May 45 Germany
280th STA HOSP – USA 23 Dec 43 - ETO 29 Dec 43 England - 9 Oct 44 France
303d STA HOSP – ETO 43 England
305th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
304th STA HOSP – USFBI 15 Sep 43 – 19 Oct 43 England – 3 Jun 45 France – 3 Aug 45 Germany
307th STA HOSP – ETO 44 England (opened RehabilitationCenter for EM on 5 Oct 44)
312th STA HOSP – USAFBI 6 Dec 43 England (specialized in psychiatric treatment involving prolonged intensive medical treatment and rehabilitation)
314th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
315th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
316th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – France
317th STA HOSP – USANIF 18 Jul 44 – England – Germany (redesignated 416th STA HOSP 1 Apr 45)
327th STA HOSP – USAFBI 30 Oct 43 England (opened first all-enemy PW Hospital facility in the UK Base, partly staffed by captured German medical staff, and supervised by Americans on 20 Dec 44)
350th STA HOSP – ETO France
365th STA HOSP – ETO 26 Jun 44 France
7607th STA HOSP (Italian) – ETO Oct 44 France

Hospital Bed Capacity and Personnel Resources:
CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL – 3000 beds > 223 Off & EM (other sources 217 Off & EM)
EVACUATION HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 296 Off & EM (other sources 375 Off & EM)
EVACUATION HOSPITAL – 750 beds > 409 Off & EM (other sources 417 Off & EM, 507 Off & EM)
FIELD HOSPITAL – 100 beds > 14 Off & 74 EM
FIELD HOSPITAL – 200 beds > 26 Off & 132 EM
FIELD HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 40 Off & 184 EM (other sources 35 Off & 211 EM)
GENERAL HOSPITAL – 1000 beds > 662 Off & EM (other sources 692 Off & EM, 734 Off & EM)
HOSPITAL SHIP – approx. 500 / 600 patients > 147 Off & EM
HOSPITAL TRAIN – 360 patients > 43 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 25 beds > 34 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 50 beds > 54 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 75 beds > 58 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 100 beds > 82 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 150 beds > 125 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 200 beds > 161 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 250 beds > 201 Off & EM (other sources 216 Off & EM)
STATION HOSPITAL – 300 beds > 233 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 350 beds > 266 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 296 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 450 beds > 331 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 500 beds > 364 Off & EM (other sources 370 Off & EM, 407 Off & EM)
STATION HOSPITAL – 600 beds > 426 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 700 beds > 480 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 750 beds > 508 Off & EM (other sources 529 Off & EM, 563 Off & EM)
STATION HOSPITAL – 800 beds > 539 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 900 beds > 596 Off & EM
SURGICAL HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 385 Off & EM
WW2 US Medical Research Centre :: WW2 MIilitary Hospitals :: European Theater of Operations
  • The_Historian and formerjughead like this
Please give the Combined Fleet the chance to bloom as flowers of death. This is the navy’s earnest request. RADM Tasuku Nakazawa prior to the Battle of Leyte Gulf
It is the function of the Navy to carry the war to the enemy so that it will not be fought on U.S. soil. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz

#2 soldiersdaughter

soldiersdaughter

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 23 August 2009 - 05:26 PM

My father was a medic at the Bulge, and I am trying to trace more specifically where he served. His last letter to his parents as he left the states on December 1, 1944, had a return address of 237th General Hospital, APO 667 %Postmaster, New York NY. I also know he was in the area of Metz, France, and helped liberate a death camp (do not know which one). Sometime after that, he was on board a troop carrier headed for the possible invasion of Japan which he had volunteered for. The 237th and its sister unit, the 233rd, were staffed with personnel from the Mayo Foundation. When Japan surrendered, his ship turned around and headed stateside. He continued to be attached to the 237th until his discharge in December 1945. I have just read the list above and cannot locate the 237th. Can anyone please give me advice on how to trace the movements of the 237th? I appreciate any research tips anyone can offer. thanks so much! :)

#3 mikebatzel

mikebatzel

    Dreadnaught

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,182 posts

Posted 24 August 2009 - 11:22 AM

Hello soldiersdaughter. Either I screwed something up when I posted this or the website has updated the information, but if you follow the link on the bottom there is an entry for the 237th General Hospital. For some reason I can not edit the origional entry.
It says simply

237th GEN HOSP - ETO Dec 44 France

As for furthering your research into the units movement and history try contacting the same website. They may well have more detailed information.
Please give the Combined Fleet the chance to bloom as flowers of death. This is the navy’s earnest request. RADM Tasuku Nakazawa prior to the Battle of Leyte Gulf
It is the function of the Navy to carry the war to the enemy so that it will not be fought on U.S. soil. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz

#4 soldiersdaughter

soldiersdaughter

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 05 September 2009 - 05:55 PM

Hi, MikeBatzel, I found it!! I think the mistake was mine, and I cannot tell you how grateful I am for your help and direction. I was thrilled to discover your work and the website that you directed me to. This is an amazing site even for an old history teacher like me. My son is an Iraqi war vet and I want to put the family military history together for him, and I started from scratch...:) I sincerely thank you for your kindness and for sharing your knowledge to help me and others...:)

#5 rrdailey

rrdailey

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 18 June 2010 - 11:35 AM

Can someone provide some information about the 7th Convalescent center in France? I believe my father may have been treated at that facility. Thank you for any help you can provide.

#6 Chappers1963

Chappers1963

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 01 October 2010 - 03:16 PM

Hi, I've got a .pdf file somewhere of the Seventh Convalescent hospitals from 43-45 If its of any use!!.

#7 WW 2 Connections

WW 2 Connections

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 60 posts

Posted 01 October 2010 - 08:31 PM

ABSOLUTELY!!!

#8 SirJahn

SirJahn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 04 October 2010 - 02:52 PM

I have a letter from my Father while he was recovering from wounds in England with an address of the 4132 U.S. Army Hospital or Hospital Plant.

How does that fit in to your hospital listing? Was there a higher grouping of the General Hospitals?
Dale
LTC USA (Retired)

#9 MinnFinn

MinnFinn

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 24 January 2011 - 06:44 PM

My mother, Anne Nelson Kunnari, who was a first lieutenant (registered nurse anesthetist) in the Army Nurse Corps during World War II, served with the 217th General Hospital in England, Scotland and France in 1944-45.
Her hospital unit moved into Paris to set up hospital 1 day after the allies liberated Paris, treating wounded German soldiers left behind and many many Allied troops through the end of the war there.
A link to an letter to the Duluth paper my sister wrote honoring her, dad and all those who've served our country in the armed forces through our country's history.
Anne Nelson Kunnari | Duluth News Tribune | Duluth, Minnesota
Mother was taken home to be with the Lord in the summer of 2010 after a full, blessed life.

#10 VET76

VET76

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 58 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 04:56 AM

Anybody have any good details on 62d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Mar 44 – 3 Sep 44 France ? My Grandfather received his purple heart at this hospital. It says on his discharge paperwork that he received it at this hospital. Just hoping someone has some info. Thank you so much

#11 mikebatzel

mikebatzel

    Dreadnaught

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,182 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 12:47 PM

I don't have much. Just little pieces gleaned from here and there. It seems the 62nd arrived in France through Utah Beach and spend some time attending wounded there. After that I'm not sure where they were located except that between November 44 and the end of the war, the six GH's in the Paris area were designated as the 814th and 815th Hospital Centers.
Please give the Combined Fleet the chance to bloom as flowers of death. This is the navy’s earnest request. RADM Tasuku Nakazawa prior to the Battle of Leyte Gulf
It is the function of the Navy to carry the war to the enemy so that it will not be fought on U.S. soil. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz

#12 VET76

VET76

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 58 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 03:40 PM

Mike,
Thanks for the info

#13 SirJahn

SirJahn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 03:45 PM

I am looking for the Admissions and Dispositions for the 35th Evac Hospital while at Rennes, France in August 1944. Anyone have a source for A&Ds?
Dale
LTC USA (Retired)

#14 mikebatzel

mikebatzel

    Dreadnaught

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,182 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 04:43 PM

I would think that would be included in a detailed unit history, but don't know where they are stored. You can try Office of Medical History

If they don't have it, I would think they would know where it can be found.
Please give the Combined Fleet the chance to bloom as flowers of death. This is the navy’s earnest request. RADM Tasuku Nakazawa prior to the Battle of Leyte Gulf
It is the function of the Navy to carry the war to the enemy so that it will not be fought on U.S. soil. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz

#15 kerrd5

kerrd5

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,258 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 10:03 PM

I would think that would be included in a detailed unit history, but don't know where they are stored. You can try Office of Medical History

If they don't have it, I would think they would know where it can be found.


Mike, these records are at the NARA II, College Park.


Dave
  • mikebatzel likes this

#16 kerrd5

kerrd5

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,258 posts

Posted 10 February 2011 - 10:08 PM

I am looking for the Admissions and Dispositions for the 35th Evac Hospital while at Rennes, France in August 1944. Anyone have a source for A&Ds?


Dale,

I would be very surprised if Admission and Disposition files were saved after the war.
I have examined Field and General Hospital records at the NARA and found no A&D files.

Nonetheless, send an email to the Archives and tell the staff what you want:

Archives2reference@nara.gov

The staff will pull the box, examine the files, and confirm what exists for August 1944.
If the records are there, they will send you a letter and tell you the cost, which is
$0.75 per page.


Dave

#17 SirJahn

SirJahn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 14 February 2011 - 07:01 PM

Thanks for the information. I will be shooting NARA an email. If they can find it I can drop over and copy them myself.
Dale
LTC USA (Retired)

#18 SirJahn

SirJahn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 01 April 2011 - 03:12 PM

Shot a mail to NARA and they said they don't deal in A&D but to get a hold of NPRA in St. Louis. They have A&Ds but not in an easily accessible form. Plus the entries are by Service Number not name and the treatment facility is not easily identified. I sent for my Father's medical records from there and will post if I can determine anything useful regarding medical units from them. They still haven't replied to my request for the specific 35th Evac A&D so I don't know if they can do that.
Dale
LTC USA (Retired)

#19 OpanaPointer

OpanaPointer

    I Point at Opana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,806 posts

Posted 01 April 2011 - 11:58 PM

The Green Books:


Set 5, Disk 2

The Medical Department: Hospitalization and Evacuation, Zone of Interior
The Medical Department: Medical Service in the Mediterranean and Minor Theaters
The Medical Department: Medical Service in the European Theater of Operations
The Medical Department: Medical Service in the War Against Japan



  • mikebatzel and rkline56 like this

"One of our King Tigers could take five of your Shermans, but you always had six of them."


WWII Resources. Primary sources.
The Myths of Pearl Harbor. Demythologizing the attack.
Hyperwar. Hypertext history of the Second World War.
Pearl Harbor Attack Message Board
Veteran: USN, 1969-1989

#20 SirJahn

SirJahn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 22 April 2011 - 07:43 PM

Got the NRPA response back all of two pages. The only thing useful was a classification of the injury and that the document was produced by the 307th Station Hospital and he spent 5 days in the evac hospital (not identified).

Anyone know anything of the 307th Station Hospital? I suspect that was the last hospital prior to discharge and was probably in the area of Nottingham, England. The medical history site implies that the 307th was dealing with convalenscing patients.
Dale
LTC USA (Retired)

#21 LRusso216

LRusso216

    Graybeard

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 10,207 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 22 April 2011 - 08:08 PM

Check this link. There is some info about the 307th that begins on p. 478. Office of Medical History

image001.png

Lou


#22 Daniel Ceccoli MD

Daniel Ceccoli MD

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 25 April 2011 - 06:59 PM

The European Theater of Operations which was to conduct the US Army’s largest and most complex land campaign of WW2 and complete the destruction of Nazi Germany, had rather modest beginnings! In agreement with its Allies, the United States Government decided to deal with ‘Germany first’ …
The initial objective was to establish Army Forces in the British Isles in order to protect them from a possible enemy invasion; another objective was to relieve a number of British troops for operations in the Mediterranean, and to reinforce the Royal Air Force with aircraft and personnel.
US Military Observers were sent to Great Britain to keep abreast of British wartime technical developments and to study the overall British war effort (the United States was not yet at war). Late 1940, the Medical Department dispatched an official Observer (Col. Raymond W. Bliss) to report on Hospitalization and Evacuation methods. American medical help had already been sent in the form of a “Contagious Disease Treatment and Control Unit”, officially designated the American Red Cross – Harvard Field Hospital Unit including a laboratory, a 125-bed Hospital, and a number of mobile investigating teams. Their task was to assist the British Ministry of Health in combating outbreaks of paratyphoid, scabies, and other diseases which were a constant threat in the crowded and bomb damaged cities.
The first US Army Military Mission to England set up its Headquarters in London, on May 19, 1941. In charge was Maj. Gen. James E. Chaney (US Air Corps) who headed the delegation formerly designated “Special Observers Group” (SPOBS). Anything that was deemed – nice to know, or necessary to know – was investigated, collected, and requested. Medical and sanitary conditions, hospital distribution, medical organization, evacuation of wounded, preventive medicine, number of beds, medical emergencies, all this information was of utmost importance to the USWD in preparation of medical planning. In mid-September 1941, Col. Paul R. Hawley (MC) was transferred to the United Kingdom to draft and prepare full plans for an American medical build-up and support in Northern Ireland and the British Isles. After the attack against Pearl Harbor, the War Department activated the Headquarters, United States Army Forces in the British Isles (USAFBI), the date was January 8, 1942, Chief Surgeon was Col. Paul R. Hawley. The same month, i.e. on January 24, 1942, another organization was created, the United States Army Northern Ireland Force (USANIF).
The first US Army medical contingents were now about to enter the “European Theater of Operations”

Background Information:

Early World War 2 Period:
Furnishing hospitalization facilities for overseas areas became another phase of the US War Department plans. Projects to garrison the Atlantic Bases got under way early in 1941; a first medical group was sent to St. John’s, Newfoundland in January, and other groups followed to Trinidad and Bermuda in April. In the fall of 1941, the very first medical units were sent to Iceland.
During the period January - July 1942, inclusive, a large number of Hospital Units moved overseas: 2 Evacuation , 2 Surgical, 4 General, 14 Station Hospitals went to Australia – 2 Evacuation , 2 General, and 2 Station Hospitals were shipped to the South Pacific – 2 Station Hospitals were transferred to the Central Pacific – 1 General and 1 Station Hospital went to Northern Ireland – 1 General Hospital to Iceland – 2 General and 3 Station Hospitals </STRONG>to England – and more later embarked for India and northwest Canada.
In March 1942 the reorganization of the War Department, and the creation of three main Commands – Army Air Forces, Army Ground Forces, and Services of Supply (called ASF after March 1943), were to cause several conflicts within the United States Armed Forces. Within the War Department, and among some elements of the SOS, such as the Quartermaster Corps and the Medical Department, functions, responsibilities, authority, control, and matters of activation, training, and supply became critical subjects for constant review among AGF and SOS staff, leading to disputes about general planning for Hospitalization and Evacuation! Directives were issued June 18, 1942 compiling policies and procedures governing H & E, but were only finalized in November of the same year.
Meanwhile new Hospital Units were earmarked for special task forces and deployment to North Africa (Operation “Gymnast”), Northern Ireland (Operation “Magnet”), and England (Operation “Bolero”).

World War 2:
By March 15, 1943, the War Department had already shipped overseas, 140 Station, 27 General, 14 Field, 2 Convalescent, 3 Surgical, and 23 EvacuationHospitals.
The Surgeon General furnished adequately trained and equipped Army Service Forces Hospital units for the Theaters of Operations, where numbered Station, Field, and General Hospitals became the most important medical installations. In the years from June 30, 1943 to June 30, 1945 the Medical Department trained 189 GeneralHospitals, 74 Field Hospitals and 61 StationHospitalsfor overseas service. In fiscal 1945, when the peak of overseas shipments occurred, the WD sent 81 General, 35 Field, and 8 StationHospitalsto the various Theaters of Operations. By May 1945, when the peak in Hospital beds overseas was reached, there were 335,000 fixed beds and about 87,000 mobile beds in all Theaters. The E.T.O. alone had approximately 700 Hospital units of all kinds in operation overseas at this time …
During the period June 30, 1943toJune 30, 1945, the MD’s task of hospitalizing sick and wounded personnel exceeded that of any previous period in the history of the U.S. Army. In that same period 5,050,718 Army patients were admitted to overseas Hospitals, and 6,002,013 to ZI Hospitals! The number of patients in Hospitals overseas increased from 47,446 on June 30, 1943 to 266,466 at the end of January 1945. Effective evacuation to the Zone of Interior reduced this number to 138,486 by June 30, 1945. Meanwhile, the number of Hospital patients in the United States increased from 167,713 on June 30, 1943 to a peak of 303,102 by June 30, 1945 (at this time, the number of authorized beds for all Hospitals in the ZI was only 314,588). To cope with this situation, The Surgeon General’s Hospital program revised the ZI Hospital system, developed and perfected a system of specialized General Hospitals, provided additional General and Convalescent Hospital beds, improved the overall administration of Hospitals, and inaugurated a program of increased standards of maintenance and improvement of Hospital facilities.

Here follows a tentative list of Military Hospitals active in the European Theater of Operations:
Convalescent Hospitals:

The Medical Department was impressed by the effectiveness of the British Convalescent & Rehabilitation system, and as a result of their survey, it ordered the building of special reconditioning camps. A first Rehabilitation Center opened on April 19, 1943 in Worcestershire, followed by a second on October 5, 1943 in Warwickshire. These centres were at first staffed by personnel from the 16th Station Hospital, reinforced by 5 Officers and 7 EM who had trained in British Convalescent camps. The 8th Convalescent Hospital took over temporarily, while the second Center started operations with 307th Station and 77th Station Hospital personnel. These projects effectively triggered activation of US Convalescent Hospitals in the ETO.
2d CONV HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France
4th CONV HOSP – ETO 24 Jun 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium – Germany
6th CONV HOSP – ETO – Belgium - Germany
7th CONV HOSP – ETO – England - France - Germany
8th CONV HOSP – ETO 28 Apr 44 England – France

Evacuation Hospitals:

2d EVAC HOSP – USANIF 27 Sep 42 – 10 Feb 44 England – Belgium (ex-4th EVAC HOSP, disbanded 24 Aug 42, split in 2 different units, the 2d EVAC HOSP sent to Northern Ireland, 4 Sep 42, and the 48th EVAC HOSP transferred to India 18 Jan 43)
4th EVAC HOSP – 10 Feb 40 (disbanded 24 Aug 42, redesignated 2d EVAC HOSP, embarked for Northern Ireland 4 Sep 42, redesignated 48th EVAC HOSP, embarked for India 18 Jan 43)
5th EVAC HOSP – ETO 13 Jun 44 France – Belgium - Germany
6th EVAC HOSP – 10 Feb 40 (disbanded 24 Aug 42, redesignated 9th EVAC HOSP, embarked for England26 Sep 42)
9th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 26 Sep 42 – 1 Nov 44 France (ex-6th EVAC HOSP, disbanded 24 Aug 42, supplied enlisted personnel to other units, including this Hospital)
11th EVAC HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France
12th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 6 Jan 43 - ETO – 7 Sep 44 France - Belgium (ex-19th EVAC HOSP, disbanded 25 Aug 42)
19th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 6 Jan 43 (disbanded 25 Aug 42, split in 2 newly designated units; 7th EVAC HOSP sent to Tongatabu 7 Apr 42, and the 12th EVAC HOSP transferred to England)
24th EVAC HOSP – ETO 12 Jun 44 France – 19 Sep 44 Belgium
27th EVAC HOSP – MTO 20 Apr 44 - ETO 1 Nov 44 France
32d EVAC HOSP – USANIF 24 Feb 44 – 12 Mar 44 England - 5 Feb 45 Germany
34th EVAC HOSP – ETO 27 Feb 44 – 23 Jun 44 France – 2 Feb 45 Luxembourg – Mar 45 Germany
35th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 18 Feb 44 – 23 Jun 44 France – 26 Dec 44 Luxembourg – 6 Mar 45 Germany
38th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 5 Aug 42 (inactivated 8 Sep 45)
39th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 18 Feb 43 – 20 Jul 44 France – 23 Dec 44 Belgium - Germany
41st EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 13 Nov 43 - ETO 13 Jun 44 France
42d EVAC HOSP – 1 Jun 41 (disbanded 15 Oct 42, partly split in 2 separate units; the newly designated 27th EVAC HOSP, embarked for North Africa 3 Apr 44, and the designated 77th EVAC HOSP, which embarked for England 5 Aug 42)
44th EVAC HOSP – USFBI 26 Nov 43 - ETO 19 Jun 44 France – 12 Sep 44 Belgium – 9 Feb 45 Germany – 23 Sep 45 France (medical support to former KZ-Nordhausen inmates from 16 Apr to 4 May 45, to ZI 10 Nov 45, and inactivated 21 Nov 45)
45th EVAC HOSP – ETO 13 Jun 44 France - Mar 45 Belgium – 30 Apr 45 Germany (operated as StationHospital at KZ-Buchenwald)
51st EVAC HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 – Dec 44 Belgium – Germany
59th EVAC HOSP – MTO 25 Aug 44 Southern France – 26 Mar 45 Germany (after serving in French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and Southern France, the unit was transferred from NATOUSA to ETOUSA, 1 Nov 44; on 10 May 45, part of the Hospital staff was detailed to the recently liberated KZ-Dachau, where the 59th EVAC HOSP C.O. was assigned as Camp Surgeon, assisted by personnel of the 116th EVAC and 127th EVAC HOSP)
65th EVAC HOSP – ETO 44 France – Belgium - Germany
67th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 29 Nov 43 - ETO 17 Jun 44 France – 25 Sep 44 Luxembourg - 31 Oct 44 Belgium – 14 Feb 45 Germany – 13 May 45 Czechoslovakia
77th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 5 Aug 42 – 21 Jul 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium (ex-42d EVAC HOSP, disbanded 15 Oct 42)
91st EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 8 Nov 43 – ETO 10 Jun 44 France – 7 Sep 44 Holland - 15 March 44 Germany (ex-6th SURG HOSP, to ZI 2 Sep 45)
93d EVAC HOSP – ETO Nov 44 – Jan 45 France – Germany (ex-61st SURG HOSP)
95th EVAC HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 – France (ex-74th SURG HOSP)
96th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 28 Feb 44 – ETO 16 Jun 44 France – 28 Sep 44 Belgium – 22 Nov 44 Germany – 27 Dec 44 Belgium – 25 Feb 45 Germany (ex-8th SURG HOSP, 96th EVAC HOSP inactivated 11 Mar 45)
97th EVAC HOSP – ETO 17 Jun 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium
100th EVAC HOSP – ETO 11 Feb 44 England – 18 Jul 44 France
102d EVAC HOSP – ETO Dec 44 Belgium – Dec 44 Luxembourg – 18 Dec 44 Belgium
103d EVAC HOSP – ETO Aug 44 France
104th EVAC HOSP – ETO Jul 45 France – Central Europe
105th EVAC HOSP – ETO 3 Sep 44 England – 5 Oct 44 France – 16 Oct 44 Holland – 16 Oct 44 Belgium – 28 Oct 44 Holland – 8 Mar 45 Germany (inactivated 2 Sep 45)
106th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France - Germany
107th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France – Dec 44 Belgium – 22 Dec 44 France – Dec 44 Luxembourg – 16 Mar 45 Germany
108th EVAC HOSP – ETO 18 Apr 45 Germany
109th EVAC HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – France
110th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France – Luxembourg – Belgium - Germany
111th EVAC HOSP – ETO Oct 44 Holland
116th EVAC HOSP – ETO – France – Jun 45 Germany (also provided medical assistance to former inmates of KZ-Dachau)
117th EVAC HOSP – ETO 44 France - Germany
118th EVAC HOSP – ETO Apr 45 Germany
120th EVAC HOSP – ETO 21 Dec 44 England – 6 Mar 45 France – 30 Mar 45 Germany (took over SS-barracks and arranged for medical treatment of former inmates, political prisoners, and slave-laborers at KZ-Buchenwald, as from 5 Apr 45 onwards, assigned to provide medical care of DPs in certain areas of Germany, as from 29 Apr 45, relieved by 7th FLD HOSP 2 Jun 45)
121st EVAC HOSP – ETO – Germany - Austria (responsible for medical treatment of former inmates at KZ-Flossenburg)
122d EVAC HOSP – ETO
123d EVAC HOSP – ETO Jan 45 France – Mar 45 Germany – Jul 45 France - Sep 45 Germany
124th EVAC HOSP - ETO
127th EVAC HOSP – ETO 30 Apr 45 Germany (responsible for treatment of former inmates, prisoners and slave-laborers at KZ-Dachau)
128th EVAC HOSP – USAFBI 2 Aug 42 – ETO 7 Nov 43 England – 10 Jun 44 France – Belgium (ex-48th SURG HOSP, redesignated 128th STA HOSP 1 May 43)
132d EVAC HOSP – ETO – France
139th EVAC HOSP – ETO 44 Germany – 45 Austria
172d EVAC HOSP - ETO

Field Hospitals:

6th FLD HOSP – USFBI Jun-Jul 44 - ETO 24 Apr 45
7th FLD HOSP – USANIF 14 Sep 43 – USAFBI 26 Oct 43 - ETO 4 Jul 44 France
8th FLD HOSP – ETO 20 Jul 44 France
9th FLD HOSP – ETO 12 Jul 44 France – 9 Sep 44 Belgium – Germany
10th FLD HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France (inactivated 4 Nov 45)
11th FLD HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 France
12th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – 26 Jun 44 France – Belgium (also responsible for medical treatment of German PWs)
13th FLD HOSP – ETO 7 Jun 44 France
14th FLD HOSP – ETO 44
16th FLD HOSP – ETO 17 Mar 44 England – 24 Jul 44 France - Germany
24th FLD HOSP – ETO Jun 44 France – Belgium
26th FLD HOSP – ETO 18 Feb 45 France
28th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – France
29th FLD HOSP – USAFBI 26 Sep 43 – 16 Jun 44 England – France
30th FLD HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
39th FLD HOSP – ETO 11 Mar 44 England – 22 Jun 44 France – 30 Sep 44 Belgium – 11 Mar 45 Holland – 30 Mar 45 Belgium - 24 Apr 45 Germany – 18 Jun 45 France (England, first assignment to Ninth US Air Force/AAF 519, primarily a USAAF Hospital, each of the 3 Platoons operated as ‘separate’ Air Force Clearing Stations)
42d FLD HOSP – ETO Mar 44 England – 8 Jun 44 France – 17 Sep 44 Holland - 16 Dec 44 Belgium – 24 Dec 44 France - 9 Jan 45 Belgium – 13 Apr 45 Germany
43d FLD HOSP – USAFBI Dec 43
45th FLD HOSP – ETO 8 Jun 44 France
46th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – France - Belgium
47th FLD HOSP – ETO Aug 44 France - Dec 44 Belgium
48th FLD HOSP – ETO Apr 44 England - France – Germany - Austria
50th FLD HOSP- USFBI 9 Mar 44 - ETO 12 Sep 44 France – 17 Sep 44 Holland – 27 Sep 44 Belgium – 14 Oct 44 Holland – 8 Apr 45 Germany – 14 Jul 45 France
51st FLD HOSP – ETO 8 Jun 44 France – 9 Sep 44 Belgium – 16 Sep 44 Germany – 29 Dec 44 Belgium – 10 Feb 45 Germany
53d FLD HOSP – ETO 27 Apr 44 England – 15 Jul 44 France – 2 Oct 44 Belgium – 14 Oct 44 Holland – 12 Dec 44 Germany (ex-229th STA HOSP, attached to 31st Med Gp in Germany, all 3 Hospital Units ceased operations between 13 and 15 Jul 45, to ZI 10 Nov 45 out of France)
54th FLD HOSP – ETO Oct 44 France
57th FLD HOSP – ETO 14 Mar 44 England
59th FLD HOSP – ETO – France
60th FLD HOSP – ETO - Belgium
61st FLD HOSP – ETO – England - Germany
62d FLD HOSP – ETO 44 England – Germany
63d FLD HOSP – ETO 12 Nov 44 England
64th FLD HOSP – ETO 18 Nov 44 England – France – Germany (to SWPA 16 Aug 45, diverted at sea to ZI 25 Aug 45)
65th FLD HOSP – ETO 44 Belgium – Luxembourg – Germany - Austria
66th FLD HOSP – ETO – Belgium - Germany
67th FLD HOSP – ETO 44
77th FLD HOSP – ETO 8 Apr 45 France (in charge of RAMPS evacuation)
78th FLD HOSP- ETO – England – Italy – France - Germany
83d FLD HOSP – ETO – Germany
96th FLD HOSP – ETO - France

General Hospitals:

1st GEN HOSP – USAFBI 28 Dec 43 - ETO 44 England – France
2d GEN HOSP – USANIF 1 Jul 42 - USAFBI 17 Jul 42 - ETO Nov 44 France (ex-209th GEN HOSP, 2d GEN HOSP inactivated 10 Jun 43, supplied cadres for other units, but only disbanded 11 Nov 44)
3d GEN HOSP – ETO 29 Sep 44 France
5th GEN HOSP – USANIF 4 Mar 42 – USAFBI 12 May 42 - 6 Jul 44 France (returned from Nova Scotia to Boston P/E, embarked again for Northern Ireland 12 May 42, ex-66th GEN HOSP, 5th GEN HOSP planned for inactivation, later marked for transfer to SWPA, instead of inactivation 15 Apr 43, disbandment 11 Nov 44 – contradiction of sources)
7th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 5 Dec 43 England
15th GEN HOSP – ETO 21 Sep 44 Belgium
16th GEN HOSP – ETO 7 Jul 44 England
19th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 5 Sep 43 - ETO 20 Aug 44 France
21st GEN HOSP – USAFBI 20 Oct 42 - ETO Sep 44 France – 28 Oct 44 Belgium – 7 Jan 45 Germany (to ZI 28 Oct 45, inactivated 7 Nov 45)
22d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
23d GEN HOSP – ETO 18 Oct 44 France
25th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 23 Dec 43 - ETO Nov 44 France – Dec 44 Belgium
26th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 20 Oct 42 (inactivated 15 Sep 45)
28th GEN HOSP – USAFBI - Jun 44 England – France - 5 Oct 44 Belgium
30th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 4 Jun 42 - ETO Nov 44 France (ex-207th GEN HOSP, 30th GEN HOSP inactivated 15 Jan 43, supplied cadres for other units, but only disbanded 11 Nov 44)
32d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 5 Sep 43 - ETO 17 Aug 44 France – Nov 44 Belgium – Mar 45 Germany – 12 Aug 45 France (to ZI 3 Oct 45)
36th GEN HOSP – ETO 9 Sep 44
39th GEN HOSP – ETO - France
40th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
42d GEN HOSP – ETO – France
43d GEN HOSP – ETO 19 Sep 44
44th GEN HOSP – ETO - France
46th GEN HOSP – ETO 8 Sep 44
47th GEN HOSP – ETO Aug 44 France – Belgium
48th GEN HOSP – ETO Apr 44 England – 23 Sep 44 France – Germany – Austria
50th GEN HOSP - USAFBI 29 Dec 43 – 15 Jul 44 France
52d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 6 Jan 43 – 6 Jul 45 England
55th GEN HOSP – ETO 3 Jul 44 England
56th GEN HOSP – ETO 1 Nov 44 Belgium
58th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Oct 43 - ETO Nov 44 France
62d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Mar 44 – 3 Sep 44 France
65th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 13 Oct 43
67th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 24 Nov 42
68th GEN HOSP – ETO 10 May 44 England
74th GEN HOSP – ETO 7 Mar 44 England
76th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 Belgium
78th GEN HOSP – ETO - England
79th GEN HOSP – USANIF 17 Oct 43 – USAFBI
82d GEN HOSP – ETO 10 Mar 44 England
83d GEN HOSP – ETO England
90th GEN HOSP – ETO 18 Oct 44 France
91st GEN HOSP – ETO 43 England
95th GEN HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – 18 Oct 44 France
96th GEN HOSP – ETO England (possessed psychiatric facilities for prolonged treatment and rehabilitation of patients)
97th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
98th GEN HOSP – ETO – France - Germany
99th GEN HOSP – ETO 20 Apr 44 England – 29 Sep 44 France
100th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 14 Apr 43 – 16 May 44 England – 22 Aug 44 France (returned to ZI 20 Aug 45)
101st GEN HOSP – ETO England – 10 Jul 45 Germany
102d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
103d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
104th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
106th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
108th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 17 Oct 43 – 29 Jul 44 France (FIRST Hospital to enter Paris on 29 Aug 44, and to open in the French Capital on 2 Sep 44, designated to study the ‘Trenchfoot’ problem on behalf of US Army, treated a lot of German PW patients at the 'Beaujon Hospital')
110th GEN HOSP - ETO Nov 44 England
111th GEN HOSP – ETO England
112th GEN HOSP – ETO England
117th GEN HOSP – ETO 5 Aug 44 England
121st GEN HOSP – ETO Aug 44 England – Jun 45 Germany (to SWPA, diverted to ETO / Germany Jul 45)
122d GEN HOSP – ETO England
123d GEN HOSP – ETO England
124th GEN HOSP – ETO Jul 44 England – 10 Aug 45 Austria
125th GEN HOSP – ETO England
127th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Oct 43 - ETO 20 Aug 44 France (to CBI Theater)
130th GEN HOSP – ETO England – France – Dec 44 Belgium
135th GEN HOSP – ETO England
137th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 England
140th GEN HOSP – ETO England
152d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 43
156th GEN HOSP – ETO England – 19 Jun 44 France
157th GEN HOSP – ETO England
158th GEN HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
159th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
164th GEN HOSP – ETO 24 Sep 44 France (first Gen Hosp to arrive in France, together with the 165th Gen Hosp, expanded to 200-bed capacity 29 Nov 44, transferred to Marseilles Staging Area for possible assignment to Pacific Theater, after V-J Day shipped to ZI 23 Aug 45, arrived at Newport News 2 Sep 45, inactivated 9 Nov 45)
165th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
166th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France (converted to hospital care for German PWs)
167th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
168th GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 France
170th GEN HOSP – ETO 30 Sep 44 England - 3 Oct 44 France (inactivated, 29 Jun 45)
179th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 France
182d GEN HOSP – ETO 5 Apr 44 England (assisted by the 682d General Hospital Complementary Unit, active from 16 May 44 to 31 Oct 45 in the UK, designated Prison Hospital for all US Army Prisoners in the Western Base from 7 Jun 44 onwards, closed down 11 Jun 45, but only effective 16 Jun 45, later successively assigned to 804th HOSP CEN, 12th HOSP CEN, 802d HOSP CEN, 905th HOSP CEN, and 805th HOSP CEN in the UK)
185th GEN HOSP – ETO England
187th GEN HOSP – ETO England – France – Belgium
188th GEN HOSP – ETO 8 Apr 44 England - France
191st GEN HOSP – ETO 44 France
192d GEN HOSP – ETO Nov 44 England
195th GEN HOSP – ETO France
201st GEN HOSP – ETO 7 Nov 44 England – 26 Dec 44 France
203d GEN HOSP – USAFBI 8 Jan 44 - ETO 22 Jul 44 France – 4 Aug 45 Belgium – 14 Sep 45 France (to ZI 18 Nov 45, arrived 29 Nov 45, and inactivated)
207th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 4 Jun 42
209th GEN HOSP – USAFBI Jul 42 England
216th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 25 Feb 44 – 16 Jun 45 France – 12 Sep 45 Germany (to ZI 31 Mar 46)
217th GEN HOSP – ETO 6 Sep 44 France
221st GEN HOSP – ETO France
235th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 France
241st GEN HOSP – ETO - England – France
242d GEN HOSP – ETO 16 Dec 44 England – Jan 45 France – Belgium (to SWPA, diverted at sea to ZI)
247th GEN HOSP – 15 Oct 44 (consolidated with 237th STA HOSP, to form the 71st GEN HOSP 7 Feb 47)
297th GEN HOSP – ETO 30 May 44 England
298th GEN HOSP – USAFBI 11 Nov 42 - ETO 16 Jul 44 France – 20 Nov 44 Belgium
306th GEN HOSP – ETO 8 Apr 45 France (in charge of RAMPS evacuation)
317th GEN HOSP – ETO 44 England

Notes: ETO “Blood Banks” were set up at the 2d – 5th – 30th – 52d – 67th – 127th and 298th General Hospitals stationed in the United Kingdom The 40th – 48th – 62d – 108th – 203d – 217th General Hospitals, all located in and around Paris, France, from late Aug 44 to V-E Day, were grouped in 2 Hospital Centers, the 814th and 815th.
Between 1 May – 15 Jun 45, elements of the 9th – 50th – 61st – 62d- 78th – 83d Field Hospitals supported PW enclosures and established new PW Hospital Centers with German medics working under supervision of American Medical Battalions.
By 2 Jun 45, Third US Army operated a total of 237 Hospitals in Germany, 3 for RAMPS, 13 for DPs, and the remainder for German PWs (in that period over 3 million enemy PWs were in American hands).

Hospital Trains:

HOSP TRAIN No. 1 – 8 Feb 44 England – ETO Rhineland - Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 3 – 20 Apr 44 Wales – 19 May 44 England – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 4 – 2 Feb 44 England – 23 Apr 44 Scotland - ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 5 – 7 Mar 44 England – 23 Apr 44 Scotland
HOSP TRAIN No. 6 – 7 Mar 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 7 – 3 Jun 43 England – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 8 – 13 Mar 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 9 – ETO 31 Oct 45 Northern France - Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 10 – ETO Normandy – Northern France
HOSP TRAIN No. 11 – 31 May 44 England – ETO 4 Aug 44 Normandy – Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace (first improvised HOSP TRAIN, consisting of French freight cars fitted with litter brackets, ran between St. Lô and Cherbourg, 4 Aug 44)
HOSP TRAIN No. 12 – 21 May 44 England – ETO Normandy – Northern France - Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 13 – 21 May 44 England – 24 May 44 Wales - ETO Normandy – Northern France (later redesignated 7th Hospital Train)
HOSP TRAIN No. 14 – 21 May 44 England - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 15 – 30 May 44 Wales – ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 16 – 7 May 44 England – 30 May 44 Wales – ETO Northern France – Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 17 – ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 18 – 26 Mar 44 England – 10 Jun 44 Scotland – 8 Sep 44 Wales – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 20 – 30 May 44 Wales – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 21 – 24 Oct 44 England – Wales - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 22 – 30 May 44 Wales – 15 Jun 44 England – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 23 – 14 Sep 43 England – 24 Mar 44 Scotland – ETO Sep 44 France -Central Europe (partly destroyed by German bombing, at the Gare St. Lazare, Paris, 26 Dec 44)
HOSP TRAIN No. 24 – 14 Sep 43 England – ETO 29 Sep 44 Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 25 – 6 Jul 44 England – 25 Jul 44 Scotland – ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 26 – 6 Jul 44 England – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe (inactivated 10 Sep 45)
HOSP TRAIN No. 27 – ETO 14 Aug 44 France (FIRST Hospital Train to reach the continent, disembarked in France 14 Aug 44, carrying the 43d GEN HOSP on board, also the very FIRST one to reach Paris 2 Sep 44, with part of the 203d GEN HOSP)
HOSP TRAIN No. 31– ETO 5 Jul 45 Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 34 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 37 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 38 – ETO Oct 44 Belgium
HOSP TRAIN No. 41 – MTO Naples-Foggia – Rome-Arno – North Apennines - ETO Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 42 – MTO Rome-Arno – Southern France - ETO 10 Sep 44 Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 43 – 11 Mar 43 England - ETO 14 Aug 44 Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 44 – 13 Nov 43 Northern Ireland - 17 May 44 England - ETO Northern France - Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 45 – 26 Jun 43 England - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 47 – 6 Apr 44 Scotland – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 49 – 6 Apr 44 Scotland
HOSP TRAIN No. 55 – 27 Jul 44 England – 2 Aug 44 Wales - ETO Northern France – Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 56 – ETO 20 May 45 Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 57 – 25 Feb 44 England (inactivated 12 Nov 45)
HOSP TRAIN No. 58 – 25 Nov 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 59 – 6 Sep 44 England
HOSP TRAIN No. 73 – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 74 – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 76 – ETO Rhineland – Central Europe
HOSP TRAIN No. 77 – ETO Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 79 – ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 80– ETO Rhineland
HOSP TRAIN No. 82 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace
HOSP TRAIN No. 83 – ETO Rhineland – Ardennes-Alsace

Station Hospitals:

3d STA HOSP – USAFBI 30 Jun 42
7th STA HOSP – USANIF 26 Sep 42 (to MTO 22 Nov 42, inactivated 15 Sep 45)
10th STA HOSP – USANIF 26 Jan 42 - USAFBI
15th STA HOSP – ETO England
16th STA HOSP – USAFBI 3 Jun 42 – USAFBI 19 Apr 43 (opened Rehabilitation Center No. 1 for Officers, active 19 Apr 431 Sep 43)
23d STA HOSP – ETO 19 Sep 44 France
28th STA HOSP – USANIF 26 Oct 43
33d STA HOSP – USAFBI
35th STA HOSP – ETO 20 Sep 44 France
36th STA HOSP – USANIF 12 Sep 43 – England (opened a special center for psychotics and non-combat related mental disorder in 1943)
38th STA HOSP – USAFBI 5 May 42 - ETO Jun 44 England
45th STA HOSP – ETO – Germany ((ex-45th EVAC HOSP 1 May 45)
49th STA HOSP – IBC Sep 42 - ETO 9 Jul 43 England
51st STA HOSP – ETO 15 Nov 44 France
68th STA HOSP – USANIF 22 Dec 43
69th STA HOSP – ETO 18 Nov 44 France
70th STA HOSP – ETO 18 Oct 44 France
77th STA HOSP – ETO 44 England
78th STA HOSP – ETO 13 Sep 44 France
80th STA HOSP – ETO 14 Sep 44 France
110th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – 2 Aug 45 Austria
115th STA HOSP –USAFBI 43 - 17 May 44 England
120th STA HOSP – USAFBI Jun 43
121st STA HOSP – ETO – England
127th STA HOSP – ETO Apr 44 England – Germany (second Hospital in charge of blood collection at Salisbury Blood Collection & Processing Plant, 26 Aug 44)
130th STA HOSP – ETO – Germany (the unit where G. S. PATTON Jr died on 21 Dec 45 at 1755 hrs)
150th STA HOSP – ETO - England
151st STA HOSP – USAFBI 30 Jun 42 (inactivated 5 Jun 44, personnel & equipment absorbed by 12th GEN HOSP)
152d STA HOSP – USAFBI 5 May 42 - ETO 19 Sep 44 France (first Hospital in charge of blood collection at Salisbury Blood Collection & Processing Plant, 15 Apr 44 – sent first refrigeration trucks ashore after D-Day, to Omaha Beach 7 Jun 44, and to Utah Beach 9 Jun 44)
160th STA HOSP – USANIF 19 Sep 42
168th STA HOSP – USAFBI 3 Aug 43 – France (had a complement of 63 black nurses who provided medical care for German PWs, supervised and commanded by white American Officers – exceptional situation in view of segregated US Army)
180th STA HOSP – ETO 13 Sep 44 France
228th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England - France
232d STA HOSP – ETO England
279th STA HOSP – ETO Jan 44 England – May 45 Germany
280th STA HOSP – USA 23 Dec 43 - ETO 29 Dec 43 England - 9 Oct 44 France
303d STA HOSP – ETO 43 England
305th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
304th STA HOSP – USFBI 15 Sep 43 – 19 Oct 43 England – 3 Jun 45 France – 3 Aug 45 Germany
307th STA HOSP – ETO 44 England (opened RehabilitationCenter for EM on 5 Oct 44)
312th STA HOSP – USAFBI 6 Dec 43 England (specialized in psychiatric treatment involving prolonged intensive medical treatment and rehabilitation)
314th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
315th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England
316th STA HOSP – ETO Jun 44 England – France
317th STA HOSP – USANIF 18 Jul 44 – England – Germany (redesignated 416th STA HOSP 1 Apr 45)
327th STA HOSP – USAFBI 30 Oct 43 England (opened first all-enemy PW Hospital facility in the UK Base, partly staffed by captured German medical staff, and supervised by Americans on 20 Dec 44)
350th STA HOSP – ETO France
365th STA HOSP – ETO 26 Jun 44 France
7607th STA HOSP (Italian) – ETO Oct 44 France

Hospital Bed Capacity and Personnel Resources:
CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL – 3000 beds > 223 Off & EM (other sources 217 Off & EM)
EVACUATION HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 296 Off & EM (other sources 375 Off & EM)
EVACUATION HOSPITAL – 750 beds > 409 Off & EM (other sources 417 Off & EM, 507 Off & EM)
FIELD HOSPITAL – 100 beds > 14 Off & 74 EM
FIELD HOSPITAL – 200 beds > 26 Off & 132 EM
FIELD HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 40 Off & 184 EM (other sources 35 Off & 211 EM)
GENERAL HOSPITAL – 1000 beds > 662 Off & EM (other sources 692 Off & EM, 734 Off & EM)
HOSPITAL SHIP – approx. 500 / 600 patients > 147 Off & EM
HOSPITAL TRAIN – 360 patients > 43 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 25 beds > 34 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 50 beds > 54 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 75 beds > 58 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 100 beds > 82 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 150 beds > 125 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 200 beds > 161 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 250 beds > 201 Off & EM (other sources 216 Off & EM)
STATION HOSPITAL – 300 beds > 233 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 350 beds > 266 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 296 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 450 beds > 331 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 500 beds > 364 Off & EM (other sources 370 Off & EM, 407 Off & EM)
STATION HOSPITAL – 600 beds > 426 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 700 beds > 480 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 750 beds > 508 Off & EM (other sources 529 Off & EM, 563 Off & EM)
STATION HOSPITAL – 800 beds > 539 Off & EM
STATION HOSPITAL – 900 beds > 596 Off & EM
SURGICAL HOSPITAL – 400 beds > 385 Off & EM
WW2 US Medical Research Centre :: WW2 MIilitary Hospitals :: European Theater of Operations

Mike,

Fellow Scrantonian, do you have any info on 127th Field Evacuation Hospital (ETO) or do you know how I can access info on this unit. My Father (Deceased) Daniel Ceccoli was an ambulance driver/mechanic with this unit 1943-45 and I am trying to gather info on his time in Europe.

Daniel Ceccoli, MD
Formerly of Scranton

#23 Spartanroller

Spartanroller

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,620 posts

Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:13 PM

These guys have a member Larry Warm who was with the 127th 1943-46;

127th Evacuation Hospital - Unit Pages

You have to register to contact him but maybe he could be of some help

this;

http://www.ibiblio.o...hures/nurse.pdf

has only a small reference on page 24, pertaining to the care of holocaust surviviors.

Hope it's some help :)
Cheers, Nigel :)

"Ubique" - For the Royal Engineer it means 'Everywhere', For the Royal Artillery 'All over the place'.;)

#24 mikebatzel

mikebatzel

    Dreadnaught

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,182 posts

Posted 27 April 2011 - 05:06 PM

Daniel, First let me apologize for not noticing this right away. Right off the bat, I did not find anything not provided by Nigel above. The 127th was sent to the Dachau area to aid in the treatment of victims there. As for where the Unit histories, in my experiance they could be anywhere (I once located the Detailed Unit Histories for a regiment I was looking into at the archives of the University of Nebraska), but I would begin with writing a request to the NARA.

If I dig up anything more I will post it here.
Please give the Combined Fleet the chance to bloom as flowers of death. This is the navy’s earnest request. RADM Tasuku Nakazawa prior to the Battle of Leyte Gulf
It is the function of the Navy to carry the war to the enemy so that it will not be fought on U.S. soil. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz

#25 jhaircutt

jhaircutt

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 10 December 2011 - 06:04 AM

I have the Book "Fifth Evac" by kaz printed in germany 1945 , only other copy I have found is in the New York City Libaray on film, any Idea what I can do with this pricless book>/? tells the story of the hospital from beganing to England landing 2 days after D Day and traveling thru france,belgem,all the way to Berlin.has pictures, daily surgerys , amount of wounded,cartoons of Hitler, pictures of everyone ,rank etc....pictures of daily goin on's I've had the book since 1955 , my step father was in the 5th , but sadly he was hit by a train and killed, 10 years after the end of the war




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users