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demolition charges


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#1 paratrooper506

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 07:44 AM

what I want to talk about is stuff like composition b and tnt you know demolition charges used during ww2

#2 JCFalkenbergIII

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 07:50 AM

So start talking instead of just posting a statement :rolleyes:.
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For the first time I have seen "History" at close quarters,and I know that its actual process is very different from what is presented to Posterity. - WWI General Max Hoffman.

#3 paratrooper506

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 07:59 AM

well basically what I am trying to say here is that demolition charges are something that are still being used today in all kinds of forms such as c4 comp b tnt and also there effectivness on blowing up bridges tanks and everything else so what else do you want me to do about getting this kind of information I mean you don,t read about demolition in your local what do you think I,m trying to get across here

#4 JCFalkenbergIII

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 08:05 AM

Google is your friend.
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#5 paratrooper506

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 08:08 AM

so your trying to tell me to use a search engine

#6 JCFalkenbergIII

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 08:51 AM

:google: is your friend.

One of the simplest plastic explosives was Nobel’s Explosive No. 808, also known as Nobel 808 (often just called Explosive 808 in the British Armed Forces during the Second World War), developed by the British company Nobel Chemicals Ltd well before World War II. It had the appearance of green plasticine with a distinctive smell of almonds. During World War II it was extensively used by the British Special Operations Executive (SOE) for sabotage missions. It is also the explosive used in HESH anti-tank shells.
During and just after World War II a number of new RDX-based explosives were developed, including Compositions C, C2, and eventually C3. Together with RDX these incorporate various plasticisers to decrease sensitivity and make the composition plastic.
The origin of the obsolete term plastique dates back to the Nobel 808 explosive introduced to the US by the British in 1940. The samples of explosive brought to the USA by the Tizard Mission had already been packaged by the SOE ready for dropping to the French Resistance and were therefore labelled in French, as Explosif Plastique. It is still referred to by this name in France, and also by a few Americans. However, most English-speaking users refer to it either by the actual label printed on the packaging (e.g. C-4 or Semtex) or as plastic explosive.
C3 was effective but proved to be too brittle in cold weather.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_explosive
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#7 paratrooper506

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 12:23 PM

thats why they have something today called c4




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