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LST Convoy to the Mediterranean


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#1 Buten42

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Posted 03 July 2009 - 05:16 AM

Need some help finding some index or list of what LSTs were involved in convoy UGS 6A that left New York for the Mediterranean on March 19, 1943. My brother was on LCT 221 during the invasions of Sicily, Salerano and Anzio--would love to find out what LST his boat was loaded on for the trip over.
What a great site, well done!

#2 formerjughead

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Posted 03 July 2009 - 05:36 AM

Welcome Aboard

Here is some info to get you started

UG convoys - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Landing Craft Tank Photo Index

THE SAILORS LOG

http://en.wikipedia....County_(LST-389)

Tank Landing Ship LST-383


Some pretty neat info......I hope it helps

#3 Buten42

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 11:38 PM

Thanks for the help, but I have checked these out. The Sailors Log is my brothers. I'm doing a short military history for him and seems he left out some details. He wrote the LCT number that took his boat from N.Africa to Europe for the Normandy invasion, but forgot which one took him to the Mediterranean from New York. He also forgot the name of the troop ship that brought him back from England to the states in Sept. 0f 45. Guess it's no great loss, but would make it more complete if I could find the information.
Thanks again and have a great 4th.

#4 T. A. Gardner

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Posted 06 July 2009 - 09:45 PM

While one cannot be absolutely sure here as small craft (LCT's qualify as small craft by Navy standards) are hard to trace much of the time, I would say once your brother arrived in the Med he was stationed initially at Bizerte harbor / Ferryville. The Ferryville harbor consisted of a large semi-artifical lake with a short canal connecting to the Med. It became the major US operating base for small landing craft in the Med during the war due to its large capacity, calm waters and, sheltered nature.

From there LCT's typically operated as part of one or another amphibious landing group and moved to where they were needed under their own power. It would have been extremely rare for one to be deck cargo while in the Med operationally.

LCT's most of the time did not carry tanks but rather were more commonly used in landings to bring ashore vehicles and artillery pieces in the early waves of the assault. After that they tended to be relegated to hauling supplies ashore from cargo vessels as they had quite a capacity to do so and could run up on the beach to unload. Occasionally, they were used to off load LSTs when the later could not properly beach or run out their pontoon causeways.

LSTs typically hauled LCT as deck cargo to Europe on on longer hauls beyond the range of an LCTs own fuel supply.

#5 Buten42

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 07:44 AM

Hey Formerjughead, I did a little better search on the first link you gave and located the name of a book that I think may have the info I'm looking for. Thanks--I may get going on this finally.
And T.A. Garner, always interested in where you WWII vets served, and always grateful. This is a great forum--really impressed.

#6 Buten42

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Posted 04 October 2009 - 11:56 PM

Thought I'd add this website for anyone who is looking for some information on WWII convoys. I wasn't able to locate the exact LST my brothers LCT was loaded on, but found out the convoy number, dates and number of vessels. Because of the ports that each LST arrived at, I was able to narrow it down to six. Thanks for the nudge in the right direction--hope this will help others.

Arnold Hague Convoy Database

#7 dajabro

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 08:57 PM

New member to forum. My dad's LST was in that convoy, the LCT they carried across was 202. Was just wondering if you were ever able to find out which LST carried your your brother's LCT?


Son of US Navy veteran, USS LST-325. Sicily, Salerno, Normandy.

Author of Mosier's Raiders: The History of USS LST-325 1942-1946

Mosier's Raiders Facebook Group


#8 TD-Tommy776

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 06:35 PM

I found an Action Report  by the commander of LCT #221 for the period 4 Sept - 21 Oct 1943  on the Fold3.com website. You may need to be a member to view/download the document.  It doesn't address Buten's original question, but it is an interesting read. Unfortunately, that was the only document I could find for LCT-221.


Freedom is precious and many gave their lives for it. It is the duty of the future generation
to remember that sacrifice, and offer some sacrifice for themselves if Freedom is threatened.

Cecil Earl Workman, WWII Veteran, "L" Co., 129th Inf. Regt., 37th Inf. Div.


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#9 Buten42

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 01:36 AM

New member to forum. My dad's LST was in that convoy, the LCT they carried across was 202. Was just wondering if you were ever able to find out which LST carried your your brother's LCT?

dajabro,  I did, but it was a lucky break.  My brother's journal gave the name of a fellow sailor that went across with him, and also served on LCT 221.  The guy passed away a year before I contacted the family but his daughter was gracious enough to send me his Bible that he kept a lot of notes in.  He jotted down that their LCT 221 was loaded on LST 389,  USS Boone County.

It's nice to have another Amphibious Navy guy on the forum.  I think this was my first inquiry--did a ton of research since then.  I didn't know about your book but will order a copy as soon as I send this.  My brother is still alive (93) and loves to read anything about the Navy--especially Amphibs.

 

If you haven't read "With Utmost Spirit".I suggest you do--very informative and well written.  The author helped me with some morning reports for #221 at Anzio- a wonderful person.

 

Thanks for the inquiry--Dave


War is sweet to those who have never experienced it.
Latin Proverb

#10 Buten42

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 04:04 AM

I found an Action Report  by the commander of LCT #221 for the period 4 Sept - 21 Oct 1943  on the Fold3.com website. You may need to be a member to view/download the document.  It doesn't address Buten's original question, but it is an interesting read. Unfortunately, that was the only document I could find for LCT-221.

Tommy,  Now, don't give me this crap about "even a blind squirrel--"  You're good.  I saw parts of this in the book "With Utmost Spirit" but never the original. Thank you very much,  I joined the free 7 day trial--might keep it if I can find more stuff.

 

A side issue,  When I was trying to locate the members and/or families of my brother's crew (there were twelve)  I could never find Captain Ziegler because I didn't have his whole name.  Still don't, but his initials are H.H.  that should give me a beginning.  The strangest thing,  During Anzio the Captain and the cew was watching a  dog fight between an American and German plane from the deck of 221.  A .50 cal. slug from one of the airplanes caught the Capttain in the right arm and shoulder putting him out of the war.

 

Ziegler gave Kaufman and Fitzgerald a Silver Star for helping the British off the LCT that morning.  My brother was also a Gunners Mate and was trying to knock out a German gun (he thinks 88) but didn't have any luck.  He said the time between the shell going off and the explosion was almost instantly.

Said you got pretty good at judgeing how far away the guns were by the time in between.

 

Thanks for the fold 3 site.  Dave


War is sweet to those who have never experienced it.
Latin Proverb

#11 TD-Tommy776

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 03:50 PM

Tommy,  Now, don't give me this crap about "even a blind squirrel--"  You're good.  I saw parts of this in the book "With Utmost Spirit" but never the original. Thank you very much,  I joined the free 7 day trial--might keep it if I can find more stuff.

 

A side issue,  When I was trying to locate the members and/or families of my brother's crew (there were twelve)  I could never find Captain Ziegler because I didn't have his whole name.  Still don't, but his initials are H.H.  that should give me a beginning.  The strangest thing,  During Anzio the Captain and the cew was watching a  dog fight between an American and German plane from the deck of 221.  A .50 cal. slug from one of the airplanes caught the Capttain in the right arm and shoulder putting him out of the war.

 

Ziegler gave Kaufman and Fitzgerald a Silver Star for helping the British off the LCT that morning.  My brother was also a Gunners Mate and was trying to knock out a German gun (he thinks 88) but didn't have any luck.  He said the time between the shell going off and the explosion was almost instantly.

Said you got pretty good at judgeing how far away the guns were by the time in between.

 

Thanks for the fold 3 site.  Dave

 

Thanks for the compliment, Dave.  Every since Biak convinced me to join fold3, I have never regretted it. If you go for the full membership, wait for one of their "sales" which they do periodically. No sense in paying more than needed.

 

As for Capt. H. H. Ziegler, I think I have a possible candidate:  Harold Herbert Ziegler, LCDR, US Navy, World War II

 

More research will be needed to make sure it's the same H. H. Ziegler, of course.  I've put in a request for a photo of the marker. Sometimes they have additional information.


Freedom is precious and many gave their lives for it. It is the duty of the future generation
to remember that sacrifice, and offer some sacrifice for themselves if Freedom is threatened.

Cecil Earl Workman, WWII Veteran, "L" Co., 129th Inf. Regt., 37th Inf. Div.


Halvorson_PTO129IR-37ID2.jpg

PFC Glenn W. Halvorson

BudETO776TD.png

PFC Norman L. Halvorson


#12 TD-Tommy776

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 04:20 PM

Oh, never mind.  It's him:  All Hands Navy Bulletin, pg. 66

 

Lieut. Harold H. Ziegler, USNR, Milwaukee, Wis.:  As officer in charge of the USS LCT 221 during the assault on the west coast of Italy he landed his ship on the heavily defended beach, discharged his cargo and withdrew despite gunfire and bombing attacks. During a subsequent mission he directed the discharge of cargo by his own crew under extremely hazardous conditions.

 


Freedom is precious and many gave their lives for it. It is the duty of the future generation
to remember that sacrifice, and offer some sacrifice for themselves if Freedom is threatened.

Cecil Earl Workman, WWII Veteran, "L" Co., 129th Inf. Regt., 37th Inf. Div.


Halvorson_PTO129IR-37ID2.jpg

PFC Glenn W. Halvorson

BudETO776TD.png

PFC Norman L. Halvorson


#13 Buten42

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 02:47 AM

Thanks again--That's him--been hiding in plain sight, just took someone who knew what he's doing to find him.

I'll bring this over to my brother tomorrow.

I'd say to go ahead and quit your day job but don't think I can talk Otto into giving you a decent salery :dance4:

Dave


War is sweet to those who have never experienced it.
Latin Proverb

#14 TD-Tommy776

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 04:50 PM

Thanks again--That's him--been hiding in plain sight, just took someone who knew what he's doing to find him.

I'll bring this over to my brother tomorrow.

I'd say to go ahead and quit your day job but don't think I can talk Otto into giving you a decent salery :dance4:

Dave

 

Yes, I believe the terms "snowball" and "hell" might come up. ;)   Besides, if I got paid for it, it might seem too much like work. Then I'd start hating it.


Freedom is precious and many gave their lives for it. It is the duty of the future generation
to remember that sacrifice, and offer some sacrifice for themselves if Freedom is threatened.

Cecil Earl Workman, WWII Veteran, "L" Co., 129th Inf. Regt., 37th Inf. Div.


Halvorson_PTO129IR-37ID2.jpg

PFC Glenn W. Halvorson

BudETO776TD.png

PFC Norman L. Halvorson


#15 Buten42

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 08:33 PM

New member to forum. My dad's LST was in that convoy, the LCT they carried across was 202. Was just wondering if you were ever able to find out which LST carried your your brother's LCT?

Finally finished reading  "Mosier's Raiders" --I really enjoyed it--You were lucky to have all the shipmates to relate their stories and experiences--it tied everything together with some human interest. You truly did a good job with the book and remembering your father's wartime service.  I gave it to my brother--He'll love it. 


War is sweet to those who have never experienced it.
Latin Proverb




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