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WWII Food Memories Best / Worst


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#1 whitakermk

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 01:41 PM

Hello, I am working on a piece about the best and worst food memories from WWII vets. All branches. From one sentence to a paragraph or two. WACS, SPARS ETC welcome, Canadian, Aussie, Mexican other allied veterans are welcome as well.

Stories can be first hand, or from a spouse, kids etc. Credit will be given in the form of a submission line.

Thanks to everyone of our service men and women.

Please email any questions. Thanks - Kent
thedeckchef@hotmail.com

#2 urqh

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 02:43 PM

im not a ww2 vet but ill wager both me and blacksnake still eat connie onnie butties...a la ww2

British Army 1939-1945 - World War II Tribute Video

 

 

[URL="http://youtu.be/Zbp_4XBmD4w"]

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 


#3 James Cox

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:00 PM

My dad kept his mess kit form WW2 and we often used it when camping. This would bring out the few stories he told us about the war. He gave it to me when I joined the Boy Scouts. I bought a new one and thew his away. I often regret that.

He told me that compared to the food he had eaten growing up, Army food was fantastic. He loved it.

Their rations came in wax coated card board boxes and he would save them, plus anyone else's that didn't want theirs, and use them to make small fires to brew tea.

He also used toilet paper soaked in alcohal on the front lines where you couldn't have smoke.

He wasn't fond of the rations and said some were very old. I think he said that some were labeled WW1, but I'm not positive.

His best meal of the war was on Thanksgiving on Bougainville. He said that the cooks made a full Thanks Giving meal and brought it up to the front lines. They ate out of their mess kits.
“The object of war is not to die for your country but to make the other bastard die for his.” Patton

#4 Erich

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:19 PM

my Father in-law served aboard a tin can in the pacific 43-45, the hellish-meal was the continual plop of mutton on metal, to this day you mention leg of lamb he starts to turn green
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#5 maxcat

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 09:10 PM

My father's worst had to be tuna fish that he became very ill from. He would never touch tuna as long as he lived and wouldn't even pet the cats if we had given them tuna oil (later water/broth) to drink.

He did keep his can opener- I still have it today!

#6 Slipdigit

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 11:45 PM

Whitaker,

I don't normally endorse the posting of the same question in multiple forums, but you might get better results if you pose your question in the threads in this part of the forum. Honor, Service and Valor - World War II Forums There are a good many veterans who visit the forum and they will be more likely to take notice of your question if you ask it in "their" thread.

But, before you do, plese go through the threads and see what comments on food you can glean from their posts.

Best Regards,  
JW :slipdigit:

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#7 hyde

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Posted 13 September 2009 - 05:39 PM

Hello, I am working on a piece about the best and worst food memories from WWII vets. All branches. From one sentence to a paragraph or two. WACS, SPARS ETC welcome, Canadian, Aussie, Mexican other allied veterans are welcome as well.

My grandfather fought in the Finnish army, so not an allied vet. But anyways, after the war he absolutely refused to eat peasoup, oatmeal or lingonberry porridge. He said that those three were basicly the only meals they had for 4 years in the front. And more often than not the food was cold when it reached them.

The one experience he did speak with great affection was Marshall Mannerheims 75th birthday in 1942 when all Finnish soldiers were given a large ration of Finnish vodka.
Dixi et animam levavi

#8 Buten42

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Posted 15 September 2009 - 01:16 AM

I have a picture of a 2nd Armored tanker sitting on a jerry can with what appears to be a leg bone of a cow with quite a bit of meat left hanging on. Seems whenever an animal was killed--sometimes intentional, it would get butchered to suppliment the C-ration diet while on the move.




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