Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Kamikaze


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 behindthelines

behindthelines

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 61 posts

Posted 25 March 2010 - 08:53 AM

Hi all I am sure you all know about Kamikazes.
But there is somethings i have always wondered about.


  • Did the planes they flew have any modifications on it to make sure that if the pilot had a change of heart he would still die.I have heard that the canopy of the plane was bolted and also there was limited fuel.Can some one clarify this? If it where we i would make the lading gear fall off after take off to make sure there was no turning back.
  • have any of you ever heard of any such cases of the pilot changing his mind and getting out alive? if so how?
I take it that the pilot had no parachute.

#2 Tomcat

Tomcat

    The One From Down Under

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,047 posts

User's Awards

3   

Posted 25 March 2010 - 11:23 AM

Thread moved to information Request Forum.
For want of a nail the shoe was lost, for the want of a shoe the horse was lost, for the want of a horse the rider was lost, for the want of a rider the battle was lost, For want of a battle the kingdom was lost, and all for the want of a horseshoe nail.

Robert,


#3 theblackalchemist

theblackalchemist

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 294 posts

Posted 25 March 2010 - 01:08 PM

Hi all I am sure you all know about Kamikazes.
But there is somethings i have always wondered about.


  • Did the planes they flew have any modifications on it to make sure that if the pilot had a change of heart he would still die.I have heard that the canopy of the plane was bolted and also there was limited fuel.Can some one clarify this? If it where we i would make the lading gear fall off after take off to make sure there was no turning back.
  • have any of you ever heard of any such cases of the pilot changing his mind and getting out alive? if so how?
I take it that the pilot had no parachute.


Greetings,

I know that all the planes carried only enough fuel for a brief one way flight.

I do not know about the bolting the canopy down bit, though i do not think so as the pilots were brainwashed systematically, and hence that reduces the chances of them escaping the dive.

Although it is noted that pilots come back if they do not find a suitable target, not out of cowardice though.
They might have wanted bigger targets if they came back, but many pilots accepted the oppurtunity when it came.

I suggest you read this thread, as it explains the ideology behind the warriors of the divine wind, as an answer to your "did they return" question.

Hope this helps a bit,

Regards,
TBA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This day, remember those who gave all, so that we may lack none.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


#4 lwd

lwd

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,563 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 25 March 2010 - 01:10 PM

There were special built planes as well as regular ones used. In some cases they apparently didn't have enough fuel to make it home. On the otherhand Sakai (one of Japans leading aces) was sent on a Kamikaze mission but returned along with most or all of his flight when they couldn't find any US ships.

In summary the answer is it varried over time and place.

#5 Gromit801

Gromit801

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,134 posts

Posted 01 April 2010 - 08:19 PM

There were special built planes as well as regular ones used. In some cases they apparently didn't have enough fuel to make it home. On the otherhand Sakai (one of Japans leading aces) was sent on a Kamikaze mission but returned along with most or all of his flight when they couldn't find any US ships.

In summary the answer is it varried over time and place.


Sakai wasn't sent AS a kamikaze. He was leading the fighter escort so the kamikaze's could get through the CAP.
"I love deadlines. I love the 'Whooshing' noise they make when they go by." - Doug Adams

#6 Biak

Biak

    Adjutant

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 5,627 posts

Posted 02 April 2010 - 03:19 AM

This might be of interest:

Captain INOGUCHI discusses the origin, philosophy, and history of the Kamikaze Corps, with particular reference to the PHILIPPINE Campaign. The interrogation contains some specific facts on Japanese air strength in the PHILIPPINE and OKINAWA operations, and on Japanese air order of battle, but in general is of most interest as a picture of the state of mind that gave rise to Kamikaze. ::::::::::

Go to the link for the full interrogation Captain INOGUCHI
USSBS: Interrogations of Japanese Officials -- [Nav. No. 12 ; USSBS No. 62]

Happiness is nice but it can't buy money.

 

Kilroy_Was_Here_by_catluvr2.gif


#7 mcoffee

mcoffee

    Son-of-a-Gun(ner)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 784 posts

Posted 02 April 2010 - 12:28 PM

Sakai wasn't sent AS a kamikaze. He was leading the fighter escort so the kamikaze's could get through the CAP.


If the book "Samurai!" is correct, Sakai was sent on a one-way mission while operating from Iwo Jima during the Summer of 1944 (Chapter 27 in my edition).

I'm always reluctant to rely too much on this book as Sakai had no direct involvement in it, and Martin Caidin was not known for his historical accuracy.
Illegitimis non carborundum

#8 Spaniard

Spaniard

    Dishonorably Discharged

  • Dishonorably Discharged
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,120 posts

Posted 02 April 2010 - 04:53 PM

What I've read concerning The Kamikaze like someone stated "mentally condition" AKA Brainwashed to carry out a suicide attack just like many are doing today. If there was US Ships and you made it back It would be dishonour, Only Death awaited you on your return.

This is correct many plains where ulterd and packed with extra fuel as explosives and could of easily made it back in other cases No just sent with enough fuel to carry out the mission. In other cases they never found any Targets and had to return to base some never made it back.

In summary the answer is it varied over time and place.


That sounds about right to me.

Heck you even had conditioned and trained Kamikaze Dogs blowing up tanks.
Those that have Evolved will sooner or later
run out of Ammo, and will be at the Merci
from the One who still carries as back up a
34" Warrior Wakizashi Knife!

#9 Skipper

Skipper

    Kommodore

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 22,405 posts

Posted 02 April 2010 - 05:24 PM

I remember reading about a Kamikaze who actually survived the crash of his plane that was downed in the sea before he had a chance to throw it on the deck of a ship. The man was picked up by Japanese and returned to his unit where he was treated as a traitor and despised by his comrades for not having a"chieved" his mission, even though he never tried to change his mind. After the war he kept silent for years but was one of the only surviving Kamikazes and eventually was convinced to tell his story some years ago. I forgot his name.

Vorsicht+Feind.JPG


#10 brndirt1

brndirt1

    Saddle Tramp

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,709 posts

Posted 02 April 2010 - 06:12 PM

You fellows might find this link of interest, it is concerning Kamikaze pilots who did survive the war.

Goto:

Wings of Defeat – Kamikaze Pilots Who Survived » HistoryNet
Happy Trails,
Clint.

#11 LRusso216

LRusso216

    Graybeard

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 10,356 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 02 April 2010 - 07:36 PM

I also came across this paragraph in Sea of Thunder by Evan Thomas 0n pg. 332:
Ugaki dutifully sent out his bombers (the kamikazes) once again the next day. Eleven of twenty-four planes reported engine problems (a reluctance to die was the more likely explanation) and only six reached Ulithi. They caused mild damage to one carrier.

Thomas makes similar comments elsewhere in the book, so I'm assuming that at least some kamikaze pilots did return.

image001.png

Lou


#12 Spaniard

Spaniard

    Dishonorably Discharged

  • Dishonorably Discharged
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,120 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 12:07 AM

You fellows might find this link of interest, it is concerning Kamikaze pilots who did survive the war.

Goto:

Wings of Defeat – Kamikaze Pilots Who Survived » HistoryNet


I read this twice just to make sure, in the Article it makes no mention why they survived nor under what circumstances? There's accounts
of plains being shot down before they reached the Battle ships and the pilot's surviving while being captured by US Naval Forces.

The bottom line Icci is if a Target presented itself or your mission was to attack US Navy ships in as Battle and you chickened out this could
have very serious implications on your return to base. :blasted:

I remember reading they would have a ceremony before they took off for their missions.

A Kamikaze suicide Pilot in WWII only had one purpose which issss, I'll give you three guesses the first two don't count. Making it back
alive after a Battle or a specific Mission was not part of the program. Especially when your main purpose is to Crash into a Battle Ship
and blow-up.

Edited by Spaniard, 03 April 2010 - 12:14 AM.

Those that have Evolved will sooner or later
run out of Ammo, and will be at the Merci
from the One who still carries as back up a
34" Warrior Wakizashi Knife!

#13 brndirt1

brndirt1

    Saddle Tramp

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,709 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 12:13 AM


I read this twice just to make sure, in the Article it makes no mention why they survived nor under what circumstances? There's accounts of plains being shot down before they reached the Battle ships and the pilot's surviving while being captured by US Naval Forces.


The program aired on PBS, and consisted of interviews with the men who survived the program. The article isn't a "definitive" account of the why's and wherefore of how they survived, it is a "lead-in" for the Independent Lense program on PBS of that name. Some of the planes crashed on take off, some failed enroute (the maintainence was sloppy), some ran out of gas.
Happy Trails,
Clint.

#14 Biak

Biak

    Adjutant

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 5,627 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 12:28 AM

From the interrogation of Captain INOGUCHI as to the 'mind set' of the Japanese airman.


""I would like to read you the history of Kamikaze which I have prepared and perhaps you will find the answer to your questions in it.


Admiral ONISHI ordered the organization of the Kamikaze on 19 October 1944. They were ready to go on 20 October, but no opportunity presented itself. On 25 October the first Kamikaze attack was made, having a great morale-raising effect. Although the attacks were ordered by the Commander in Chief (1st Air Fleet), in fact it was originated by the feeling of all combatants in the PHILIPPINE Area. All were beginning to think that there was no way but suicide to save the situation; there were many volunteers.
For example, on 15 October, Admiral ARIMA. Commander of the 26th Air Squadron, himself dove into an aircraft carrier. Admiral ARIMA lit the fuse of the ardent wishes of his men in order to bring their wishes into reality. At this time we in the PHILIPPINES thought about the approach of the crisis, owing to the odds. So we felt as follows: we must give our lives to the Emperor and Country, this is our inborn feeling. I am afraid you cannot understand it well, or you may call it desperate or foolish. We Japanese base our lives on obedience to Emperor and Country. On the other hand, we wish for the best place in death, according to Bushido. Kamikaze originates from these feelings"

Happiness is nice but it can't buy money.

 

Kilroy_Was_Here_by_catluvr2.gif


#15 Spaniard

Spaniard

    Dishonorably Discharged

  • Dishonorably Discharged
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,120 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 12:37 AM

The program aired on PBS, and consisted of interviews with the men who survived the program. The article isn't a "definitive" account of the why's and wherefore of how they survived, it is a "lead-in" for the Independent Lense program on PBS of that name. Some of the planes crashed on take off, some failed enroute (the maintainence was sloppy), some ran out of gas.



Yes I know in those cases the men would of survived they did have Parachutes but the Japs must of used the men again
given them new plains Unless badly injured. I remember reading many Jap pilots where rescued after their plans crashed at sea.

I know it's program and not definitie, just making the comment the article does not mention it.

Carrying out their mission properly, your chances of Survival Nil.


I found an article One of the few surviving Japanese pilots trained for kamikaze missions yesterday came face-to-face with his former
British Navy enemies more than 50 years after the end of the Second World War. Hichiro Naemura, now 82, was one of only a FEW
airmen to survive the conflict in the Pacific, which saw thousands of young Japanese men kill themselves in officially sanctioned
suicide attacks on allied warships. He was an experienced combat pilot in the Japanese Army Air Force before switching to become a
kamikaze instructor in "special attack" units, known as Tokko. He had mixed feelings about the tactic, which was seen as a desperate
measure by the Japanese High

http://www.japanvisi...ID=359&pID=1089


See these Link your going to see rear Footage.

Kamikaze Survivor refuses to be rescued , kills himself

http://www.liveleak....=abe_1236439343

WW II Kamikaze video

http://www.liveleak....ew?i=c4c6d17e49

http://www.liveleak....ew?i=c4c6d17e49

Edited by Spaniard, 03 April 2010 - 01:01 AM.

Those that have Evolved will sooner or later
run out of Ammo, and will be at the Merci
from the One who still carries as back up a
34" Warrior Wakizashi Knife!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users